Tag Archives: Antigua

A Caribbean Brunch Favorite: Ackee And Codfish – By Minna LaFortune

A Caribbean Brunch Favorite: Ackee And Codfish

Published on Mar 31 2016,  News Americas. NY
ackee-and-saltfish

A Caribbean Brunch Favorite: Ackee And Codfish

News Americas, NEW YORK, NY, Fri. April 1, 2016: Getting an invitation to attend a Caribbean breakfast or brunch is the invitation to a special experience!

Caribbean breakfast foods are very special because they are meals that are also served at lunch and dinner.

They are large meals that contain all the major food groups complimented with fresh herbs and spices and medley of several tropical fruits. To ask a Caribbean national in the region or in the Diaspora what is their favorite breakfast or brunch dish is to get a list of starches, fish, meats, vegetables, beverages and fruits.

The responses no doubt will vary from island to island.     Continue reading

Maduro or Guyana? Caricom’s choice – By Mark Wilson – commentary

Maduro or Guyana? Caricom’s choice

By Mark Wilson  – Trinidad Guardian – Published: – Sunday, October 25, 2015

“Could be a second Angola,” an ExxonMobil source last week told Upstream magazine. That’s Guyana’s offshore oil discovery. Angola produces close to two million barrels a day, around the same as Nigeria. 

In August, T&T was producing 75,000 barrels.

ExxonMobil announced its Liza-1 oil find in May. Then they moved fast.

They’re talking a 2018 start-up with 60,000 barrels, ramping up quickly to three times that amount. They will use a floating production storage and offloading vessel, with no time-consuming onshore infrastructure.

ExxonMobil plans four wells offshore Guyana next year. That will cost perhaps US$800 million.   Continue reading

The View from Europe: The future is services – By David Jessop – Commentary

Commentary: The View from Europe: The future is services
Published on April 25, 2015 – By David Jessop
When in the early 1990s it became apparent that Europe’s preferential regimes for Caribbean bananas and sugar were coming to an end, an impassioned debate began about a transition to other forms of economic activity. For the most part, the language then was about alternative crops, import substitution, manufacturing, exports and financial services, with little said about tourism, as its sustainability was widely regarded as uncertain.

david_jessop.jpg
  David Jessop

Since then the world has moved on. Tourism has come to dominate most Caribbean economies; offshore financial services, after being encouraged, have come under threat from the same developed countries that had originally recommended them; and agriculture has only begun to genuinely reorient itself where it is low cost, has clear niche opportunities, or there is a recognised need to ensure food security.

Although this diminished role for traditional agriculture is still hard for some in the region to accept, it is clear that the greater part of the economic future for smaller economies is now in services (alongside taking much greater advantage of the Caribbean’s economically strategic location to transship, assemble or manufacture). So much so that in the small island economies it is likely to be the services sector that becomes the significant economic driver in the future.
Continue reading

Madeiran Portuguese Migration to Guyana, St. Vincent, Antigua and Trinidad – By Jo-Anne S. Ferreira

Madeiran Portuguese Migration to Guyana, St. Vincent, Antigua and Trinidad:

A Comparative Overview

Madeira Island click for info

Madeira Island click for more info – Wikipedia also click map to enlarge

By Jo-Anne S. Ferreira – University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad.

THIS PAPER REPRESENTS a preliminary exploration of Madeiran migration to the Anglophone Caribbean.1 It seeks to consider the phenomenon of Madeiran migration in the context of the wider Anglophone Caribbean by comparing and contrasting the waves of Madeiran migration across the region, including the extent and rate of cultural assimilation in each new home of Madeiran migrants. Apart from the primary sources available for the Portuguese community of Trinidad, mainly secondary sources have been used and assessed for the other territories as an initial basis for comparison. This is done particularly where the experiences of migrants have been reportedly similar.2

During the 140 years of Madeiran Portuguese migration to the Anglophone Caribbean, a period lasting from 1835 to 1975, Portuguese and Luso-West Indians have remained a minority group within the wider host societies.   Continue reading

Selling Caribbean Citizenship – by David Jessop

Selling Caribbean Citizenship –  By David Jessop

News Americas, LONDON, England, Mon. Jan. 6, 2014: Governments in North America and Europe are beginning to look more closely at citizenship for investment schemes, after a small but growing number of incidents have raised concerns about who passports are being issued to. Although much of the media have confused the illegal issue of diplomatic or regular passports with those provided under legal citizenship by investment programs that many nations operate, it is clear that the whole question of being able, in one or another way, to offer citizenship without a residence requirement is coming under increasing international scrutiny; with the real danger being that ordinary citizens may come to face blanket requirements for visas where none previously existed.   Continue reading

UK picture archives on the Caribbean 1872-1960 – now available

UK colonial picture archives on the Caribbean  1872-1960 – now available

Slum house in the Caribbean

News Americas, NEW YORK, NY, Fri. April 5, 2013: Caribbean nationals can now get a glimpse into the past via “The Caribbean Through a Lens Project.”

The National Archives-UK has been working with community groups there to share and explore Caribbean images from 1872 to 1960s that are being culled from the Colonial Office library photographic collection and the Central Office of Information British Empire collection of photographs.   Continue reading

750 Guyanese deported in 2012

750 Guyanese deported in 2012

JANUARY 7, 2013 · BY  ·  COMMENTS

The Police today said that 750 Guyanese were deported from various countries last year.

Delivering statistics on a variety of areas, the police said that during 2012, a total of 750 Guyanese nationals were deported from the United States of America, Canada, the United Kingdom, Trinidad, Barbados, French Guiana, Suriname, St. Maarten, Curacao, France, Antigua, Jamaica, Holland, Costa Rica, and Spain.           Continue reading

Criminal deportees sent back to the Caribbean in 2012 – US report

Criminal deportees sent back to the Caribbean in 2012 – US report

News Americas, NEW YORK, NY, Thursday Jan.3, 2013: A total of 55,742 criminal immigrants were sent packing from the U.S. and back to their homelands in the Caribbean and Latin America in 2012, New Americas has found.

Data NAN obtained and analyzed from the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency on deportee rates to Latin America and the Caribbean, found that while some 4,898 of all criminal immigrants were sent back to the Caribbean last year, Latin America accounted for over 12 time that number with 50,844.
A “criminal alien” is defined under U.S. immigration laws as a migrant who is convicted of a crime. Most of those deported were sent back for murders and sex and drug crimes.      Continue reading

Allen Stanford found guilty of vast fraud

Allen Stanford found guilty of vast fraud

HOUSTON (Reuters) – Allen Stanford was convicted on Tuesday of running a $7 billion Ponzi scheme, a verdict that caps a riches-to-rags trajectory for the former Texas financier and Caribbean playboy.

Allen Stanford

It was a vindication for the U.S. government, which closed down Stanford’s financial empire in February 2009 but had failed for years to address signs that the business was built on air. The Stanford case was the biggest investment fraud since Bernard Madoff’s.

Stanford was found guilty on 13 counts of a 14-count criminal indictment, including fraud, conspiracy and obstructing an investigation by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. He was found not guilty on one count of wire fraud. The charges carry a possible prison sentence of nearly 20 years.  [more]

— Post #1171

The farce we call West Indies cricket – By Lester B. Bird

  Post #1163  –  From: caribbeannewsnow.com

The farce we call West Indies cricket

Published on March 3, 2012
By Lester B. Bird
Former prime minister of Antigua and Barbuda and former member of the West Indies Cricket BoardST JOHN’S, Antigua — If there was any doubt about the incompetence of the West Indies cricket administration or hope of a resurrected West Indies, the scheduling of the forthcoming Australian tour provides ample evidence of an organization that suffers from both incompetence and insensitivity.Three ODls are to be played in St Vincent; three ODls are to be played in St Lucia and a test match in Dominica. In other words over fifty percent of the matches would be played in a grouping whose population represents less than 8% of the cricket loving population of the English speaking Caribbean.If the argument is the cost, then it is improbable to think that a third one day in St Lucia, or a third one day in St Vincent would be more profitable than a single one day in a more populated country such as Jamaica or even Antigua. Given the fact that Jamaica is so far in the north and it is costly for Jamaicans to travel to the other parts of the Caribbean I think that Jamaica should always be included in a touring cricket itinerary.

It does appear that, true to the management style of the West Indies Cricket Board, it is a decision to punish Jamaica for its decision to pick Gayle for national duty. This schedule is blatantly insensitive and irrational. Continue reading

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