Author Archives: guyaneseonline

Guyana and International News and news from Guyanese Associations worldwide

INTERVIEW: CRICKET: Sonny Ramadhin: ‘In 1950 we had the three W’s – England had Len Hutton’

Last survivor of West Indies’ first Test win in England 70 years ago recalls a heady day at Lord’s, a tough childhood in Trinidad and his love of English pitches

Sonny Ramadhin’s spin accounted for 11 England wickets in West Indies’ historic Test victory at Lord’s in 1950.
 Sonny Ramadhin’s spin accounted for 11 England wickets in West Indies’ historic Test victory at Lord’s in 1950. The tourists won by 326 runs. Photograph: Chris Bethell/the Guardian

As England’s last wicket fell at Lord’s in June 1950, a handful of West Indies fans spilled over the boundary rope, keen to celebrate their first Test victory at the home of their cricket-inventing colonisers.

At his home in Delph on the edge of Saddleworth Moor, Sonny Ramadhin, the last living player from that history-making West Indies side, remembers the scenes. “Quite a few of the West Indians came on to the ground and we had to run to the dressing room,” the 91-year-old says.      Continue reading

TRAVEL: St Vincent-based airline One Caribbean could start regional flights soon

One Caribbean Airline Saab 30 seater

July 7, 2020 (CMC) Prime Minister Dr Ralph Gonsalves of St. Vincent says the Kingstown-based One Caribbean airline could begin regional flights as soon as next Sunday as part of its efforts to fill the void left by cash-trapped regional carrier LIAT.

The major shareholder governments of LIAT have, with the exception of Antigua and Barbuda, agreed to place the airline into liquidation. St John’s has criticised the move and instead is urging support for the idea of a new company, LIAT 2020, to take over the operations of LIAT (1974) Limited, whose other major shareholder governments are Barbados, St Vincent and the Grenadines, and Dominica.        Continue reading

US Politics: Pulling Down Statues? It Dates Back to U.S. Independence – By ANDREW LAWLER

Enthusiasm for the American Revolution led colonists to burn, disfigure, and deface any symbol of Britain and its hated king.

ANDREW LAWLER | National Geographic

Fireworks, Bands, and Cookouts are essential ingredients of any Fourth of July celebration.

What is usually NOT on the menu is toppling statues, ripping down signs, or burning portraits.

But in the days following the new nation’s declaration of independence, Americans went on a frenzy of destruction that makes today’s attacks on Confederate and other symbols of white supremacy pale by comparison.        Continue reading

EDUCATION: COVID-19: Colleges and Universities are facing possible financial disaster

COVID-19 upends the college experience in the USA – Video

ABC News’ Terry Moran reports on college students pushing for tuition refunds during the pandemic, while some universities face financial pain.

EDUCATION: UK universities facing possible financial disaster, research says

After-effects of coronavirus outbreak could affect one in 20 students and cause steep job cuts

New graduates at a UK university.
 Estimates found that the UK higher education sector will endure losses of between £3bn and £19bn in 2020-21. Photograph: Bailey-Cooper Photography/Alamy Stock Photo 

As many as 13 British universities could face financial disaster from the after-effects of the coronavirus outbreak, affecting one in 20 students in the UK and causing steep job cuts, according to research.    Continue reading

Guyana Politics: APNU+AFC countrywide protests point fingers at Caribbean Court ahead of key ruling

APNU+AFC supporters protesting on Mandela Avenue, Georgetown.

There are countrywide protests organised by A Partnership for National Unity+Alliance For Change (APNU+AFC) to press home its position that the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) does not have jurisdiction to hear an appeal in the “valid votes” case by the People’s Progressive Party (PPP).

Ahead of Wednesday’s decision by the  Trinidad-headquartered regional court, APNU+AFC supporters on Monday staged several peaceful protests on the Buxton-Friendship-Vigilance public road, East Coast Demerara; Plaisance, East Coast Demerara ; Mandela Avenue, Georgetown; Agricola, Greater Georgetown and Linden in Region 10.

Buxton and Agricola are known to be coalition pressure points.          Continue reading

Medical School Education Wrongly Favours Academic Achievement – Jessica Hamzelou | New Scientist

Medics Who Changed History Would NOT Get Into Modern Medical Schools

Jessica Hamzelou | New Scientist

Many of the people behind the most significant medical discoveries of the past 300 years wouldn’t have got into medical school by today’s standards, BECAUSE THEY EITHER STUDIED THE “WRONG” SUBJECTS, GOT LOW GRADES OR DIDN’T FOLLOW THE RULES.

The finding highlights how the education system wrongly favours academic achievement over other important traits, like persistence and creativity, says David Jenkins at the University of Toronto, Canada. “We have to be much more flexible in how we accept young people into medical school or any other profession or activity that is their goal,” says Jenkins.          Continue reading

Guyanese Cuisine: Chefs Adams, Ramsay cook up a ‘storm’ in Guyana – National Geographic

Photo: Chef Delven Adams and Britisn-born chef Gordon Ramsay cooking traditional Guyanese food in Rewa, a small Amerindian village in Guyana, for the second season of Uncharted on National Geographic.  NatGo / Justin Mandel
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Guyana’s popular chef, Delven Adams, proprietor of Georgetown’s Backyard Cafe, will debuted his unique traditional cuisine on Sunday, July 5, on the second season of the National Geographic TV series Gordon Ramsay: Uncharted. The episode was aired on NatGo on Sunday, July 5 at 10 pm, 9 Central.
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The charismatic Adams, a remigrant, whose culinary tours have mesmerized foodies, and attracted tourists from around the world, told Caribbean Life in an exclusive interview via Facebook, that the National Geographic episode is more about showcasing Guyana.

Guyana Tourism: A trip to Moraikobai, Guyana – Webinar – July 9, 2020 @ 2.00 pm EDT

Join us for our webinar

A trip to Moraikobai, Guyana

Thursday, July 9th 2020 @ 2 pm EDT

As a destinationGuyana prides itself in its Community-Led and Owned Tourism (CLOT). In this webinar, we are going to focus on some of the newer, more rustic, experiences that are currently being developed in Guyana. We will start with the Indigenous Community run village of Moraikobai. The quiet location provides guests with encounters of some of Guyana’s most renowned wildlife. The best part? A visit to the village can be done on a day trip from the capital city of Georgetown.

Join us to find out more about why you should take a trip to Moraikobai on your next visit to Guyana!  

We look forward to having you!

Register Here

Guyana: Tourism recovery after COVID-19 – By Annette Arjoon-Martins

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On certain occasions, I use the space in this column to deal with a pressing subject using the expertise of someone proficient in that field.  Today, as we contemplate what Guyana will be like after COVID-19, the column presents the viewpoint of my wife, Annette Arjoon-Martins, knowledgeable in matters of travel and the environment in Guyana.

By Annette Arjoon-Martins

Guyana’s tourism product is largely dependent on international visitations so the international travel ban for COVID-19 has hit the industry really hard, virtually bringing that sector to a halt.

There are realities here facing us.  Our major tourism attractions are mostly located in the deep hinterland, where road connectivity is not in place, and even in the limited locations where they exist they are always at the mercy of inclement weather.          Continue reading

South Africa and the COVID-19 – by Francis Quamina Farrier

Click to enlarge

– by Francis Quamina Farrier

Since the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, and its spread all around the world, I have written articles which have focused on the way some countries have been dealing with the challenges brought on by the pandemic.
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Many African countries with populations in the millions, have less than 100 deaths. The reason being, that those countries took immediate action and put things in place to stop the spread of the disease at an early stage; they closed their borders and international airports and went into national lockdown very early. Testing was also immediate and quarantine put in place wherever and whenever it was necessary.              Continue reading
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