Tag Archives: Barbados

GUYANA Politics: That “Bloated” Electoral List – by Ralph Ramkarran 

  – Conversation Tree Blog 

In 2010 I wrote an article on the overseas vote in which I argued that the Constitution of Guyana permitted all Guyanese citizens over the age of 18 to vote. Since there was no residence stipulation, Guyanese residing overseas have a right to vote. As readers would imagine, it elicited some controversy. I was a member of the leadership of the PPP at that time.

Mr. Robert Corbin, then leader of the PNCR, in a masterful display of irony, accused the PPP of seeking to re-introduce the overseas vote which, incidentally, the PNC had facilitated and grossly manipulated in the 1968 elections so much so that voters were registered as residing at the address of a horse pasture in the UK.        Continue reading

Airports closed; houses collapse under the weight of La Soufriere ash – St. Lucia and Barbados affected

DIONNE BAPTISTE CREATED : 10 APRIL 2021 – Loop News

The effects of the La Soufriere volcano eruption is being felt way beyond the shores of St Vincent.

Regional airlines LIAT and Caribbean Airlines were forced to cancel flights and a thick plume of ash has blanketed St Vincent, parts of Saint Lucia and Barbados.

READ MORE: 

TRAVEL: New Airline- interCaribbean Airways – to serve Barbados

—  New airline to take off August 4

Published 02 August 2020 – Barbados Nation News

mia-mottley

Barbados PM Mia Amor Mottley

Prime Minister Mia Mottley yesterday announced the arrival of interCaribbean Airways to Barbados, with flights expected to start from August 4.

She revealed that the airline, which is based in Turks & Caicos, had already started interviews for local staff.      Continue reading

History: West Indian and African Migration to British Guiana (Guyana) from 1834 – By Odeen Ishmael

Map of the Caribbean

West Indian and African Migration to British Guiana from 1834

With the passing of the Emancipation Act in 1833, the sugar planters in British Guiana (Guyana) anticipated a labour shortage even though the apprenticeship system would force the ex-slaves to continue to provide free labour. As a result they made plans to recruit labourers from the West Indies and elsewhere. (recruitment of Portuguese indentured labour was featured earlier in Guyanese Online HERE).

Because of the close proximity of the West Indian colonies, the planters felt it would be more economical to bring a paid labour force from those islands. Between 1835 and 1838, about 5,000 labourers were recruited from Barbados, St. Kitts, Antigua, Montserrat and Nevis. These islands either had no apprenticeship system or they had a fairly large free African population by 1834. The employment of West Indian full-time wage labour was carried out by the private sugar planters who competed sharply among themselves for the available migrants.     Continue reading

EGovernment, A Step Towards A More Citizen-Centred Caribbean | By David Jessop

By David Jessop :Sunday | January 19, 2020 | Jamaica Gleaner

SLOW, BUREAUCRATIC AND UNPREDICTABLE SERVICE

Politicians love to promise a better and brighter future. They tend to say little about the day to day experience their citizens have of the services they provide.

In the Caribbean as in other parts of the world what most individuals want from government is the rapid and efficient delivery of everyday resources, if policies and regulations are to mean anything at all.

This applies equally to social services, whether in relation to schools, hospitals or pensions, the supply of utilities, or to matters as normal as renewing a driver’s licence or registering a birth or death. Citizens everywhere want such basic transactions to be straightforward, quick and predictable. They hope their fellow citizens who work for them in the public sector have the ability and tools to deliver what has been promised in modern and efficient way.            Continue reading

Ghana’s president promotes “Year of Return” to five Caribbean nations

Photo: President of Ghana, Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo

By Ray Chickrie – Caribbean News Now contributor – June 12, 2019

GEORGETOWN, Guyana —  President Akufo-Addo has embarked on a working visit to five Caribbean nations as part of efforts promoting the “Year of Return.” 

Having proclaimed 2019, as the “Year of Return” to Ghana, the 400th anniversary of the commencement of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade, when the first 20 West African slaves landed in Jamestown, in the Commonwealth of Virginia, the commemoration, according to President Akufo-Addo, “is a statement of our determination that never again should the African peoples permit themselves to be subjected to such dehumanizing conditions, sold into slavery and have their freedoms curtailed in order to build up forcibly countries other than their own and create wealth for the peoples of unknown lands to which they were sent, wealth from whose enjoyment they were largely excluded.”        Continue reading

Guyana’s Economy: We must demand what’s justly ours – By Lincoln Lewis

We must stand our ground and demand what’s justly ours

CARICOM: CSME Member States Sign on to Contingent Rights Protocol

Caricom Headquarters
Georgetown. Guyana.

BASSETERRE, St Kitts, Monday March 4, 2019 – Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Member States that are participating in the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME) have all signed on to the Protocol on Contingent Rights and most of them are prepared to immediately begin provisional application of the Protocol.

The Protocol covers the rights of persons moving to another country under the free movement of skills regime, as well as the spouses and dependents of those who move to another country.    Continue reading

Strengthening Justice Delivery In The Caribbean

Strengthening justice delivery in the Caribbean

January 23, 2018 – : Caribbean News Now

PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad — Antiquated systems have long been the bane of legal practitioners in the Caribbean, contributing to severe case backlogs, expensive legal services and debilitating delays.

In 2016, the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) established APEX as a not-for-profit agency to deliver capacity building and technology-based solutions to improve justice delivery for Caribbean courts, law offices and related agencies.   Continue reading

The View from Europe: Oil, the environment and the Caribbean – By David Jessop

Earlier this month Exxon announced that that it had made a major new oil find off Guyana. It was, it said, the largest since it began exploration there in 2015. The company’s statement followed one last June advising of a ‘world-class discovery’ on another well, and before that, announcements about four other commercially exploitable finds.

What this and Exxon’s recent request to the Guyanese government for permission to drill up to 40 new wells after 2022 suggests, is that the country is about to become a major oil producer in the Western Hemisphere.      Continue reading