Tag Archives: Barbados

Ghana’s president promotes “Year of Return” to five Caribbean nations

Photo: President of Ghana, Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo

By Ray Chickrie – Caribbean News Now contributor – June 12, 2019

GEORGETOWN, Guyana —  President Akufo-Addo has embarked on a working visit to five Caribbean nations as part of efforts promoting the “Year of Return.” 

Having proclaimed 2019, as the “Year of Return” to Ghana, the 400th anniversary of the commencement of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade, when the first 20 West African slaves landed in Jamestown, in the Commonwealth of Virginia, the commemoration, according to President Akufo-Addo, “is a statement of our determination that never again should the African peoples permit themselves to be subjected to such dehumanizing conditions, sold into slavery and have their freedoms curtailed in order to build up forcibly countries other than their own and create wealth for the peoples of unknown lands to which they were sent, wealth from whose enjoyment they were largely excluded.”        Continue reading

Guyana’s Economy: We must demand what’s justly ours – By Lincoln Lewis

We must stand our ground and demand what’s justly ours

CARICOM: CSME Member States Sign on to Contingent Rights Protocol

Caricom Headquarters
Georgetown. Guyana.

BASSETERRE, St Kitts, Monday March 4, 2019 – Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Member States that are participating in the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME) have all signed on to the Protocol on Contingent Rights and most of them are prepared to immediately begin provisional application of the Protocol.

The Protocol covers the rights of persons moving to another country under the free movement of skills regime, as well as the spouses and dependents of those who move to another country.    Continue reading

Strengthening Justice Delivery In The Caribbean

Strengthening justice delivery in the Caribbean

January 23, 2018 – : Caribbean News Now

PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad — Antiquated systems have long been the bane of legal practitioners in the Caribbean, contributing to severe case backlogs, expensive legal services and debilitating delays.

In 2016, the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) established APEX as a not-for-profit agency to deliver capacity building and technology-based solutions to improve justice delivery for Caribbean courts, law offices and related agencies.   Continue reading

The View from Europe: Oil, the environment and the Caribbean – By David Jessop

Earlier this month Exxon announced that that it had made a major new oil find off Guyana. It was, it said, the largest since it began exploration there in 2015. The company’s statement followed one last June advising of a ‘world-class discovery’ on another well, and before that, announcements about four other commercially exploitable finds.

What this and Exxon’s recent request to the Guyanese government for permission to drill up to 40 new wells after 2022 suggests, is that the country is about to become a major oil producer in the Western Hemisphere.      Continue reading

BARBADOS 1966-2016 – Celebrating Fifty Years of Independence – By Dr. Keith A. P. Sandiford

CELEBRATING FIFTY YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE – BARBADOS 1966-2016
By Dr. Keith A. P. Sandiford

barbadosFormer Caribbean colonies are more fortunate than African and Asian ones in that they have completed their first 50 years of political freedom without political and military coups and without the copious shedding of human blood. On November 30, 2016, Barbados will join Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago as fifty-year old sovereign states which have thus far avoided the turmoil of revolutions. It is an achievement worthy of joyous celebration. There is a sense that the island has shown perceptible signs of regression, following the worldwide recession of 2008, but the overall all progress since 1966 has been eminently satisfactory.

The emergence of modern Barbados can be said to have begun in the 1950s with the rise of the Barbados Labour Party (BLP) and the Barbados Workers’ Union (BWU). These were the institutions that destroyed the political hegemony of the old plantocracy. They focussed most sharply on the plight of the non-white majority and led the movement which forced the Colonial Government to overhaul its administrative structures and reshape the electoral laws as well as its fiscal practices.   Continue reading

UN: Caribbean leaders warn of region’s economic collapse

Caribbean leaders warn of region’s economic collapse

Caribbean News Now!- caribbeannewsnow.com – September 26, 2016

browne_un.jpg

Photo: Prime Minister Gaston Browne of Antigua and Barbuda addresses the general debate of the General Assembly’s 71st session. UN Photo/Cia Pak

NEW YORK, USA — Gaston Browne, prime minister of Antigua and Barbuda, told the United Nations General Assembly on Saturday September 24, 2016 that, along with climate change and lingering indebtedness, Caribbean islands face another existential threat from the withdrawal by global banks of correspondent banking relations to their financial institutions.

In the global campaign against money-laundering and terrorist financing, very strict penalties have been imposed on banks by regulatory bodies in North America and Europe for any infringement of the stringent regulations.
Continue reading

Profile: Avinash Persaud: Currency Economist, Scholar, Financial Wizard! – By Dr Dhanpaul Narine

Profile: Avinash Persaud: Currency Economist, Scholar, Financial Wizard!

– By Dr Dhanpaul Narine

Avinash Persaud

Avinash Persaud

Avinash Persaud’s biography reads like that of a Nobel Prize winner. He was voted by the prestigious ‘Prospect Magazine’ as one of the top three intellectuals in the world to give advice on the financial crisis.

Avinash has had a distinguished career in the world of economics and finance and it spreads across finance, academia and public policy. He is currently a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington and an Emeritus Professor of Gresham College and a non-executive chairman of Elara Capital PLC. Avinash is also a former Governor of the London School of Economics and the 2010 President of the British Association for the Advancement of Science 9 (Section F).    Continue reading

Sugar in the Blood: A Family’s Story of Slavery and Empire by Andrea Stuart – reviews

Sugar in the Blood: A Family’s Story of Slavery and Empire by Andrea Stuart – review

Sugar in the BloodAn absorbing but uneven family memoir taking in both sides of the Barbadian slave trade and its legacy — (www.theguardian.com review)

Modern Britain was built on sugar; there is hardly a manufacturing town on these shores that was not in some way connected with the “Africa trade”. The glittering prosperity of slave ports such as Bristol and Liverpool was derived in large part from commerce with Africa.

In the heyday of the British slave trade, from 1700 to 1808, West Indians (as white sugar barons were then known) became conspicuous by their new wealth. Often they cast Barbados or Jamaica aside like a sucked orange in order to fritter their profits in England. A popular melodrama of 1771, Richard Cumberland’s The West Indian, satirised planters as drunken layabouts in ostentatiously buckled shoes and hats.   Continue reading

NO MUSICAL ENGINE HERE – by Dave Martins.

Dave Martins

Dave Martins

NO MUSICAL ENGINE HERE – by Dave Martins.

Following recent musical explorations in the country, including Dr. Vibert Cambridge’s excellent book, “Musical Life in Guyana”, the current depressed state of our music industry is once again a topic of discussion. We are hearing renewed calls for more music education in the schools, and for ways to make instruments more affordable.

A well-known music teacher stressed the need to identify and foster singular musical talent. Some have called for the creation of a Guyanese “national sound”, and there has been the inevitable shout for government funding for music studios and facilities. It is fair to say that, particularly following Dr. Cambridge’s book, serious concerns have been raised about the state of our music industry today.  Continue reading

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