Category Archives: Arts / Culture

OPINION: Reimagining the Caribbean Diaspora: diversity, equity and inclusion – by Lear Matthews

 by Lear Matthews

 This article focusses on the English speaking Caribbean Diaspora’s experience within the context of diversity, equity and inclusion in the aftermath of recent societal unrest and institutional realignment in the United States. Informed by a concern for social justice and cross-cultural dynamics, this writer unpacks how this population has been affected by the burden of racism and xenophobia. It highlights a continuation of courageous conversations on the topic (See Guyanese Online: February 20-21, 2021).             Continue reading

GUYANA: Popular storyteller and singer ‘Auntie Comesee’ turns 100

“Auntie Comesee”, with family friend Melanie Seaton, daughter of Retired GDF Colonel Pluto Martindale (deceased).

By Frederick Halley

LAMENTING that she hasn’t been able to attend church, concerts and the gym over the last year or so because of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, celebrated a significant milestone on February 8, 2021. The famous storyteller and singer who over the years thrilled audiences in Guyana and Toronto, Canada with her unique style, turned 100.      Continue reading

BOOK: Charles Blow’s ‘The Devil You Know: A Black Power Manifesto’ — By HOPE WABUKE

January 26, 2021 – By HOPE WABUKE

In his new book ‘The Devil You Know: A Black Power Manifesto’, Charles Blow recalls hearing Harry Belafonte give a speech.

The subject was Belafonte’s bailout of some student members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC.) Belafonte had raised $70,000 in bail money and called up his best friend Sidney Poitier  to help him deliver the money. But it was not easy. Belafonte recalled how he and Poitier were chased by the Ku Klux Klan, whose members accosted them at the airport; Belafonte and Poitier had to take off speeding in a race for their lives.        Continue reading

GUYANA-born, RUDOLPH DUNBAR (1907-1988) was a musical genius and a brilliant journalist

RUDOLPH DUNBAR – The Pioneering Musician, Campaigning Black Journalist and World War II Correspondent Who Covered The Liberation Of Europe With A Conductor’s Baton In His Knapsack

Rudolph Dunbar

Tim Crook | The Journal

GUYANA-born, RUDOLPH DUNBAR (1907-1988) was a musical genius, a brilliant journalist and indefatigable campaigner for racial justice – but post Second World War, he was discriminated against and excluded from the riches of success he so greatly deserved.

Dunbar was featured and celebrated for his appearances as a conductor and musician on BBC Radio during the 1930s.            Continue reading

Why has England and the UK succeed so much in its history? – Opinion

Honorary President and founder at Comité Bastille, a Think Tank on Tax Reform. (2006–present)

There are many reasons, but all of them were the consequence of three basic reasons without which England could have become a bigger Denmark, a respectable European nation but nothing else:

  1. England is on an island of the right size, right climate and fertile soil to become home of a significant population. Japan is in a similar situation, but with the handicap of earthquakes. Both went through many wars and problems before they got united but they did it.       Continue reading

Guyana SPEAKS event– Sunday 28th February 2021 – Focus on TOURISM

Our next Guyana SPEAKS event is being held on Sunday, 28th February 2021.
We are delighted to announce that our distinguished speakers are: Stacey Dos Santos-Rahaman, of the award-winning Visit Guyana travel & tourism brand; Egbert Carter, known for his unrivalled knowledge of the colonial architecture in Guyana, and Khadijatou Doyneh, an international performing artist and spoken word poet.  For speakers’ bios, please see this attached Pdf. >>>  GS Flyer – 28 Feb 2021
 
Please book your free tickets via the following eventbrite link.   

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Opinion: Fetishizing of the Black mixed child – By Akola Thompson

Mulatto, dougla, buffiana, blasian – there are many words that are used to describe the Black mixed child. It was not so long ago when social orders stood firmly against miscegenation that these children would be considered persona non grata. Today, the mixed Black child is portrayed as a mythical creature with powers to cure racial disharmony.

We all know the popular calls to douglarize the nation or make mixed babies to end racism today. Chances are that you’ve been one of those sounding the trumpet for mixed relationships as you see them as being revolutionarily necessary in times of such unease. Coming out of a history of illegality and rejection, the push for the Black mixed child is steadily increasing.          Continue reading

New York: “The City on Life Support”; Bad news for Guyanese hopefuls – Opinion

GUYANA: This mixed up place – By Dave Martins – Commentary

By

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You’re in Guyana for a week, or for a longer spell

Let me give you some background, it will serve you well.

I summarise by saying that we have a mixed up place.

Your first time come to Guyana? I’ll give you the straight case.

Most of what you hear ‘bout it, you better realize

The water this side really rough, so everything capsize.

Guyana not like Barbados, Antigua or St. Kitts,

Continue reading

Valentine’s Day: Love bloomed out of a Garbage Clean-Up Campaign – by Francis Quamina Farrier

– by Francis Quamina Farrier

February 14 is Valentine’s Day, and in keeping with the spirit of LOVE, let me relate the story of a Love that blossomed right out of a garbage Clean-Up exercise in Georgetown! That may not sound as the most romantic start of an article for Valentine’s Day.

Nonetheless, it is a True Story of Young Love which came to be, because of a garbage clean-up exercise by a group of public spirited Young People in Georgetown. The group, Guyana Shines/Youths for Guyana, is very active in helping to Keep the City Clean.      Continue reading