Category Archives: finance and trade

EDUCATION: COVID-19: Colleges and Universities are facing possible financial disaster

COVID-19 upends the college experience in the USA – Video

ABC News’ Terry Moran reports on college students pushing for tuition refunds during the pandemic, while some universities face financial pain.

EDUCATION: UK universities facing possible financial disaster, research says

After-effects of coronavirus outbreak could affect one in 20 students and cause steep job cuts

New graduates at a UK university.
 Estimates found that the UK higher education sector will endure losses of between £3bn and £19bn in 2020-21. Photograph: Bailey-Cooper Photography/Alamy Stock Photo 

As many as 13 British universities could face financial disaster from the after-effects of the coronavirus outbreak, affecting one in 20 students in the UK and causing steep job cuts, according to research.    Continue reading

Covid-19: why the economy could fare worse than you think | The Economist – Video

Three months after lockdown was relaxed in China, its economy is now running at around 90% of normal levels. Although 90% may sound fine, for many it could be catastrophic…. especially if the level of economic recovery is even lower.

Read more here: https://econ.st/2AeZ86k

Sir James Douglas – born 15 August 1803 in Demerara [Guyana] – Governor of BC

Sir James Douglas – Governor of British Columbia (1858-64)

Sir James Douglas, governor of Vancouver Island (1851–64) and British Columbia (1858–64), fur trader (born 15 August 1803 in Demerara [Guyana]; died 2 August 1877 in Victoria, BC). Remembered as “the Father of British Columbia,” Sir James Douglas helped establish colonial settlement, trade and industry on the West Coast. As Chief Factor of the Hudson’s Bay Company (1839–58), he helped the HBC become a trading monopoly in the Pacific Northwest.
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As governor of the Crown colonies of Vancouver Island and British Columbia, he initiated British rule west of the Rocky Mountains and negotiated land purchases with First Nations, which some argue were conducted in bad faith (see Treaties with Indigenous Peoples in Canada).

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REVEALED: Mary Trump – The Family Member Who Turned on Donald Trump

BAD BLOOD

The president’s niece Mary Trump is set to publish a tell-all this summer — and to reveal that she was a primary source for The New York Times’ investigation into Trump’s taxes. 

Lachlan Cartwright | The Daily Beast

Donald Trump’s niece, his deceased brother’s daughter, is set to publish a tell-all book this summer that will detail “harrowing and salacious” stories about the president, according to people with knowledge of the project.

Mary Trump, 55, the daughter of Fred Trump Jr. and eldest grandchild of Fred Trump Sr., is scheduled to release TOO MUCH AND NEVER ENOUGH on July 28, Simon & Schuster confirmed Monday, just weeks before the Republican National Convention.      Continue reading

Urban living: Great cities after the COVID-19 pandemic – The Economist

How much harm has Covid-19 done to large Western cities?

Jun 13th 2020 edition – The Economist

Until recently big cities were unstoppable. Year after year places like New York, London and Paris grew richer and busier. Since the turn of the century they have shrugged off a dotcom crash, a financial crisis, terrorist attacks and political populism caused partly by resentment at their prosperity and arrogance. Could their magical run possibly be coming to an end?      Continue reading

Remote working: How cities might change if we worked from home more – BBC News

Times Square – Empty

For many of us, our homes have become our workplaces over the past few months, and a full return to the office still appears a remote prospect.

Major tech companies say they are open to their staff working from home permanently. Employees are coming to realise remote working is not only possible but, in some cases, preferable. A shift to a new way of working might already be under way.

Such a shift could have profound implications on our home life, and by extension on the life of our towns and cities: almost a quarter of all office space in England and Wales is in central London alone.

To understand those implications, we brought together four experts on city life, all of whom were working from home.    Continue reading

BUSINESS: The Hardest Hit Companies of the COVID-19 Downturn are ‘BEACH’ Stocks

The ‘BEACH’ Stocks —booking, entertainment, airlines, cruises, and hotels 

The market’s latest storm has plunged the global travel industry into uncharted territory.

Since the S&P 500 market high on February 19, 2020, market capitalizations across BEACH industries—booking, entertainment, airlines, cruises, and hotels—have tumbled. The global airline industry alone has seen $157B wiped off valuations across 116 publicly traded airlines.

BEACH Stocks: $332B in Value Washed Away by March 24, 2020

Investor confidence in cruise lines has also dropped. Between Carnival, Royal Caribbean, and Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings, over half of their market value has evaporated—equal to at least $42B in combined market capitalization.          *All numbers as of market close on March 24, 2020

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VIDEO: 1929 Stock Market Crash and the Great Depression – BBC Documentary

1929 Stock Market Crash and the Great Depression – Documentary

Brief History of that other economic designed crash of 1929 BBC documentary

On October 29, 1929, Black Tuesday hit Wall Street as investors traded some 16 million shares on the New York Stock Exchange in a single day. Billions of dollars were lost, wiping out thousands of investors. In the aftermath of Black Tuesday, America and the rest of the industrialized world spiraled downward into the Great Depression (1929-39), the deepest and longest-lasting economic downturn in the history of the Western industrialized world up to that time.   Continue reading

VIDEO: The Truth Behind The Coronovirus Pandemic; Lockdown and Economic Crash – David Icke

DAVID ICKE – THE TRUTH BEHIND THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC: COVID-19 LOCKDOWN & THE ECONOMIC CRASH

ECONOMICS: Will there be another Great Depression? – The Guardian UK

Government indecision amid the coronavirus crisis has fuelled fears of a long recession – unless there is a huge fiscal response
Unemployed men eat soup in Washington, circa 1935.
 Unemployed men eat soup in Washington, circa 1935. Photograph: Archive Photos/Getty Images

Such was the scale of the global market crash last week in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak, the spectre of the 1929 Wall Street rout and the ensuing Great Depression of the 1930s has been raised. Comparisons no longer seem fanciful.

The failure of the US and the UK to swing into action with a wide range of mitigation measures – despite the lessons of Italy’s slow response to the spread of Covid-19 – has heightened concerns that a sustained, epochal downturn lies in wait.          Continue reading

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