Category Archives: Commentary

JAMES WITTROY Mc RAE – A  Short  Story by  Royden  V  Chan – 2005

JAMES WITTROY Mc RAE

A  Short  Story by  Royden  V  Chan – 2005

Allan Agard was diagnosed with a terminal illness almost two years ago and had now passed away. The viewing was being held today at Osgood Funeral Home on Sheppard. Allan and his wife Gladys both came from a family background of teachers and professional civil servants, which traditionally influenced their preference for academic vocations.

They both graduated from the University of the West Indies and worked in the Caribbean for several years until 1970 when they responded to the “back to home” call from Guyana’s Prime Minister, Forbes Burnham.  Allan was appointed as a Senior Lecturer at the University of Guyana and Gladys was attached to the Ministry of Education.            Continue reading

Guyana History: Johnny Carpenter and the Mekdeci family – By Freddie Kissoon

Johnny Carpenter and the Mekdeci family – By Freddie Kissoon

In my column of Sunday, May 20, 2018, captioned, “White fans didn’t know he was an East Indian boy” I wrote the following; “I remember when I was small there was a shoe store at Camp and Regent Streets named Shu-All. The owners passed as Portuguese but they were Syrians.”

Yesterday, the prominent, Portuguese-Guyanese businessman, Johnny Carpenter, came up to me in the National Park. I pass Mr. Carpenter daily in the park and the customary hello follows. But yesterday, while walking my dog, Mr. Carpenter asked for two minutes of my time. I told him he can get more than two minutes.
What Johnny Carpenter had to say to me was amusing. But there also wasn’t a funny side to it considering what I did to Carpenter.      Continue reading

Strongmen Have the Edge with Trump. Why Not Maduro? – Commentary

Strongmen Have the Edge with Trump. Why Not Maduro?

Michael Shifter and David Toppelberg | The New York Times

Nicolás Maduro

WASHINGTON — Since President Trump took office almost 18 months ago, commentators have remarked on his apparent affinity for strongmen. As The Times columnist Thomas L. Friedman commented, “Trump […] seems to prefer dictators to our democratic allies everywhere.”

To be sure, this doesn’t mean that Mr. Trump can’t have acceptable working relations with democratic leaders, such as President Emmanuel Macron of France. But, in general terms, he seems more at ease with — and respectful of — authoritarian leaders such as the presidents Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines, Abdel Fattah el-Sisi of Egypt and, of course, Vladimir Putin of Russia. In short, strongmen have the edge.                          Continue reading

The negatives of ICT are now affecting all of us – By Adam Harris

The negatives of ICT are now affecting all of us

Jul 15, 2018  Features / Columnists,- By Adam Harris

When I was a boy growing up I heard talk about robots taking over jobs that people were doing. It sounded like science fiction, but it was not long before it became reality. People were afraid of the technology because they saw themselves being put on the sidelines.

It turned out that as technology developed new jobs appeared. The centres that produced cars introduced robots. Soon robots controlled the assembly line and of course, cars were produced faster and with near impeccable finishes.          Continue reading

Renewable Energy Soundscapes – By the Rosaliene Bacchus Blog

Three Worlds One Vision

Primal Sonic Visions by Bill Fontana

Primal Sonic Visions by Bill Fontana
Photo Credit: Venice Science Gallery, Italy

Joan Sullivan – a Canadian-based renewable energy photographer, blogging at Artists and Climate Change – has opened my senses to diverse artists working to help us embrace our transition to a 100 percent renewable energy economy. In her post, “Renewable Energy Soundscapes,” published on July 12, 2018, Sullivan introduces us to Bill Fontana’s Primal Sonic Visions, now on exhibition at the Venice Architecture Biennale 2018.

Seventy-one-year-old Bill Fontana, an American composer and sound art pioneer, told Sullivan that the project, commissioned by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), transformed him as an artist through his experimentation with moving images and invention of a new visual language.

Primal Sonic Visions prompts deep reflection on the power and effectiveness of energy capable of ensuring the future of our planet and triggers an emotional response to…

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The issue of rape – For Guyana’s children is there an escape? – By Yvonne Sam

The issue of rape – For Guyana’s children is there an escape?

By Yvonne Sam

Children are a country’s valuable resource. When will Guyana tackle the scourge– Rape?

The issue of rape has reared its ugly head again ( Kaieteur News, July 13, 2018),  especially as it pertains to females who have not even attained tweenhood. It is blatantly apparent Even to the severely myopic that sexual perversion, enmeshed with unchecked lunacy is running rampant in Guyana.

There are some issues that just cannot be swept under the rug, and others once swept under is soon rejected.Sexual Assault Awareness Month was celebrated in April, and Guyana joined with several other countries to celebrate SAAM under the theme “Embrace your Voice.” The teal ribbon was adopted as a symbol of sexual assault awareness and prevention. What is being done about the children? What plans are being put in place to further strengthen existing ones to stem this scourge?        Continue reading

There is no longer the Medvedev syndrome in Guyana – By Freddie Kissoon 

There is no longer the Medvedev syndrome in Guyana

Jul 11, 2018  Features / ColumnistsFreddie Kissoon 

After serving two terms, Vladimir Putin could not run for the presidency in 2008. Though the Russian constitution does not impose term limits, a president can only serve two consecutive terms. He can later down the years be elected again. What happened then is that Putin manoeuvred his ally, Dmitry Medvedev, into the presidency in 2008 waiting to return in 2012.

Thus was born the Medvedev syndrome, meaning Medvedev was simply a surrogate of Putin. Real power was not with Medvedev, the president, but the powerfully placed Putin. Why it is referred to as the Medvedev syndrome is because Medvedev was simply holding on for Putin to come back. Medvedev could not have become his own man between 2008 and 2012, because after 2012 he would have felt the wrath of Putin.              Continue reading

After 25 Years of Being Homeless, – By Gregory P Smith | The Guardian UK

After 25 Years of Being Homeless, I Learned There’s One Simple Thing You Can Do to Help

Gregory P Smith | The Guardian UK

There are as many pathways to homelessness as there are homeless people in the world. For some, it’s a sudden freefall triggered by a lost job, a broken home life or some other seismic personal upheaval.

For others the road to sleeping rough winds down a slow, steady and depressing gradient until it arrives – quite literally – at rock bottom. Tragically, some are even born into it. Many have mental illness to contend with.

No matter how they got there, however, every homeless person has one thing in common:

They know how it feels to be an outcast.               Continue reading

WATER: Waste not, Want not! – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

WATER: Waste not, Want not!  – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Water, and not oil, will be the source of future world conflicts.  It will be the biggest threat to world peace.

It is New Year’s Eve. Thousands are in Manhattan to watch the ball drop. By the time the clock strikes midnight, until lunch the following day, New York would have consumed enough energy to supply the Caribbean for a year and millions of liters of water would be wasted.

It is lunchtime in a New York City Public School. By the time the session is over gallons of milk and sandwiches and fruit will go to waste. They will be dumped without being touched. When we waste food we waste energy. We waste water. Food on the table involves a complex chain, from land preparation to production, transportation, storage, marketing and packaging and finally consumption.

Read More:  Waste Not.Want Not – Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

WORLD CUP: Croatia motivated by English pundits’ lack of respect – says Luka Modric

Croatia motivated by English pundits’ lack of respect, says Luka Modric

 Real Madrid midfielder says media underestimated his side
 ‘They should be more humble and respect their opponents’

Luka Modric has accused English journalists and pundits of showing a lack of respect to Croatia’s players and admitted his teammates had used criticism to motivate them to victory against England in their World Cup semi-final.

Modric impressed as Croatia came from behind to win after extra time in Moscow but the Real Madrid midfielder was scathing in his reaction towards sections of the English media, some of whom had predicted an easy win for Gareth Southgate’s side.

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Also Read:

Croatia have crushed England’s World Cup dream with a 2-1 extra-time victory in their semi-final at the Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow 

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