Category Archives: Commentary

Guyana Memories: “I’ll always Remember” and “I’ll never Forget” – by Francis Quamina Farrier

Dave Martins with Farrier

Like so many Guyanese and many other nationals around the world, I am a Dave Martins fan. I love his music with that rich bouncy Caribbean beat. I love his lyrics, always with something to learn and think about. And during the past decade or so, I have come to enjoy reading his weekly column in the Sunday Stabroek News.

In a more recent article entitled “Lessons I never forgot”, in which he was reflecting on his learning experiences while an up-and-coming musical entertainer, I couldn’t help observing his use of the term, “I never forgot”,  which was in the Headline.  It got me to thinking of something I was doing unwittingly for many decades, with the use of that term,  “I’ll never forget”, and it’s twin, “I’ll always remember”, and realised that somehow I was using both terms, which I suppose means the same thing, very selectively.    Continue reading

Business: Sears – The Store That Changed America – Declares Bankruptcy

Countz Lifestyle

Sears, the once-dominant retail chain that changed how Americans shopped and lived, has filed for bankruptcy, CNN reports.

The 132-year-old company has been struggling for several years and is drowning in debt. The final straw was a $134 million debt payment due Monday that it could not afford.

Sears Holdings (SHLD), the parent company of Sears and Kmart, is among dozens of prominent retailers to declare bankruptcy in the era of Amazon (AMZN).

The filing in federal bankruptcy court in New York came in the early hours of Monday morning. The company issued a statement saying it intends to stay in business, keeping open stores that are profitable, along with the Sears and Kmart websites.

As of the filing, about 700 stores remained open and the company employed 68,000 workers. That’s down from 1,000 stores with 89,000 employees that it had as recently as February.

But Sears said that it’s…

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Profile: The late Romesh Singh – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Profile: Romesh Singh -Engineer, Activist and Teacher

Romesh Singh, also known as Romesh Chandra Dutt was a person of many interests. He built radios and radars, set up communication links that brought the world closer and never lost sight of the fact that ordinary people matter. Romesh was one of the foremost telecommunications engineers of his generation that designed complex systems.

He was unassuming but firm in his convictions, and above all, he had an abiding love for his homeland, Guyana.

When you were with Romesh you knew that he stood for what was right. He did not play around with words, or said one thing and meant something else. Romesh was the genuine article, a scholar with varied interests, outspoken in his views, and always giving of his best to the community.

Read more: Profile – Romesh Singh = By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Guyana: Questionable medical schools; too many C-Sections for mothers

Leonard Gildarie

Oct 14, 2018 – Kaieteur News – By Leonard Gildarie

What I am about to write will raise the hackles in especially hospitals, but then again that is the idea.

I am hoping that we can spark some debate and a look at the operations of especially our local, privately-owned hospitals. Many of them are getting away with murder.

I was browsing the online news of CNN on Friday and stumbled on a piece headlined “C-section deliveries nearly doubled worldwide since 2000, study finds”.

I was intrigued and then angered. And I will explain why.      Continue reading

Sexual violence is the savage manifestation of female domination – By Mohamed Hamaludin

Sexual violence is the savage manifestation of female domination

By MOHAMED HAMALUDIN

A healer to the sexually brutalized and a survivor of such brutality — the Norwegian Nobel Committee selects them for the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize.

The year is 1999 and Denis Mukwege, a French-trained gynecologist, opens the Panzi Hospital to treat women brutalized by war in his native Congo, dubbed the rape capital of the world.

Performing around 10 surgical operations in 18-hour days, Mukwege treats more than 85,000 women, 50,000 of them survivors of wartime rape. In a United Nations speech in September 2012, he denounces  “violence against women and rape as a strategy of war.” A month later, he escapes an assassination attempt because he is not at home at the time and goes into exile in Europe for three months. He returns after women in the area served by his hospital sell their crops to pay for his plane ticket.    Continue reading

Why Are Most Caribbean Governments Ignoring A $500 Billion Marijuana Industry?

Potentially A $500 Billion Industry … recreational cannabis in Canada from Oct. 17th. 2018

legal-marijuana-and-the-caribbean

Legal Marijuana in Canada

News Americas, NEW YORK, NY, Fri. Oct. 12, 2018: As per usual, most Caribbean governments are lagging behind the 8th ball when it comes to the multi-billion-dollar industry of marijuana – a herb that easily grown in the region and has for many decades now.

The snail like movement in some nations and the non-movement in most others, come as Vivien Azer, the only pot analyst from a major Wall Street research house, claimed this week that that the market could be one day worth $500 billion.     Continue reading

Who will be the world’s largest oil producing country – per person – in the 2020s? – commentary

Exxon-Mobil- Exploration Rig

………..  that honour will belong to the South American nation of Guyana

Kuwait perhaps, with three million barrels per day and a population just over four million? Saudi Arabia or, looking further afield, Brunei or Norway? No, that honour will belong to the South American nation of Guyana, which could well be sharing output of 700,000 barrels per day among just 770,000 people.

Although adjacent to Venezuela, Guyana has been better known for sugarcane, and cricketers such as Clive Lloyd, Lance Gibbs and Shivnarine Chanderpaul, than oil. But after first striking oil at Liza in 2015, ExxonMobil and partners Hess and China National Offshore Oil Corporation have made nine major discoveries in deep offshore waters, with production due to start in 2020.      Continue reading

Issues confronting the Caribbean’s Ageing Diaspora and Regional Governments? – By Shamette Hepburn

By Shamette Hepburn – Stabroek News

Over several decades members of the Caribbean diaspora have observed the day to day happenings in their territories of origin. Spiraling crime rates, increased economic hardship and insecurity generally punctuate the news from back home. Yet they know that crime and violence are only a small part of Caribbean life. The rest is positive and fulfilling and Caribbean migrants remain tethered to their homelands.

Members of the Caribbean diaspora have consistently travelled between North America, the United Kingdom and the Caribbean region in order to maintain their social ties. While the vast majority of Caribbean nationals are keen to travel back and forth, some are committed to returning permanently to the Caribbean. It is this group that Caribbean governments are intent on re-incorporating into their respective national fabrics.     Continue reading

Caribbean: Jamaica and St. Vincent Join Marijuana Export Sector

St. Vincent to join marijuana export sector

BY BERT WILKINSON

Just about two weeks ago, authorities in Jamaica approved of the island’s first shipment of oil extracted from the increasingly trendy marijuana plant to be exported to markets in Canada paving the way for the island to earn valuable foreign exchange from its latest export product but not all of Jamaica’s neighbors are sitting back and are continuing to treat any engagement with cannabis sativa as criminal activity.

Governments and the medical sectors in Antigua, St. Vincent and others are also moving to develop medical marijuana industries both for local and international consumption.              Continue reading

Clarkson’s Car Years – Who Killed The British Motor Industry? – BBC 2000 – Video

Clarkson’s Car Years – Who Killed The British Motor Industry? – Video  (BBC 2000)

Comment: Back in the days when the elite were trying to break union power, the workers got blamed for constantly going out on deliberately provoked strikes. Many still blame the workers for the demise of the car industry, but if you look at it logically, it was the abysmally poor management. This is easily demonstrated by the fact that the Japanese, Toyota and Honda, came here, employed the same workers, and have enjoyed a long history unfettered by industrial action.    Continue reading

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