Category Archives: Racial Conflict

Historical diagnoses of Guyana’s predicament – By: Dr. Bertrand Ramcharan

 By – May 12, 2021

Dr. Bernard Ramcharan

Dr. Ramcharan was the Seventh Chancellor of the University of Guyana. He was born on April 27, 1943 in Diamond, Guyana. (more info at end)

Peoples’ perceptions count in politics. The news columns and letters in the Guyanese media bring out varying perceptions. Might one turn some of these perceptions to positive use for the future of the country? Yes we can: by assembling a volume of historical diagnoses of Guyana and drawing recommendations from them.

Some years ago, civil society in Guyana brought in this author as part of an international team to discuss with the various political, cultural, and other formations their perceptions of the way forward for the future of a multi-ethnic country.          Continue reading

U.S.A: The truly aggrieved are the descendants of slaves not of slave owners– By Mohamed Hamaludin

In this time of coronavirus/COVID-19, “herd immunity” has become a familiar phase but there are two versions. One says that nobody should be vaccinated, allowing everybody to be infected and the virus simply disappears. The scientific version is that everybody – or at least a sufficient number of people –should be vaccinated, making the population immune.

It is an absorbing intellectual exercise trying to determine which version applies to European Americans – the so-called white people – that has caused them to become immune to the reality of their original sin and the continuing agony of the descendants of the four million enslaved African Americans – the so-called black people.      Continue reading

PROFILE: AA Thorne: Guyanese politician, trade unionist, journalist and educator – By Nigel Westmaas 

AA Thorne
AA Thorne

Described as the “lean man with the jerky gait”, Alfred Athiel Thorne straddled the political and social life of Guyana for more than 60 years, in a career spanning from the late 19th to mid-20th century. Yet little is known in modern times about this titanic figure in the political and social life in colonial Guyana and his significant roles in supporting and struggling on behalf of the working class and other causes.

Contrast this with the reception accorded his contemporary, Hubert Critchlow, whose career and contributions are fairly well documented and recognized. This is surprising as Thorne arguably had an equally impactful career as his sometime rival Critchlow.        Continue reading

ENVIRONMENT: They are killing our forest- Brazilian tribe warns : BBC News

Two Awa children smile for the camera in 2014

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro has asked for $1bn (£720m) a year in foreign aid to reduce illegal deforestation in the Amazon rainforest.

But under Mr Bolsonaro deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon has soared, jeopardising the livelihoods of some of the world’s most vulnerable indigenous communities.

Our chief environment correspondent, Justin Rowlatt, has been trying to find out what this has meant for an Amazon tribe he first met back in 2010.          Continue reading

OPINION: A kind look at the complex issue of race in Guyana – By Geoff Burrowes

– By Geoff Burrowes

I was born into and grew up in a multi-racial society. There were black people who were the descendants of slaves who had been sold to slave owners and treated as chattels or the owner’s property, to be used as the owner pleased. Most had worked on cotton or sugar plantations in dreadful conditions and after generations of freedom, still bore the scars of that experience.    Continue reading

USA POLICING: There Will Be More Derek Chauvins – Adam Serwer | The Atlantic

Powerful political actors are committed to ensuring that the system of American policing remains unchanged.

Adam Serwer | The Atlantic

During his closing argument, Steve Schleicher, one of the prosecutors trying the former police officer Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd, insisted that jurors could convict Chauvin without convicting policing.

“This is not an anti-police prosecution,” Schleicher told the jury. “It’s a pro-police prosecution.”

For his part, Chauvin’s defense attorney, Eric Nelson, told the jury that “all of the evidence shows that Mr. Chauvin thought he was following his training. He was, in fact, following his training.”                Continue reading

U.S.A. — Migrant crackdown by Western nations is rooted in centuries of racist science – By Mohamed Hamaludin

  Immigration policy is usually regarded as a political matter but a much more sinister motive has existed for centuries due to studies by scientists and others who, starting in the 1700s, have strived mightily to prove that foreigners are less than human and, if allowed to immigrate, would pollute the nation.

Journalist and author Sonia Shah,in her book “The Next Great Migration,” traced the work of scientists who pursued such research, including French naturalist George Luis Leclerc Comte de Buffon: “As people and species migrated from the Garden of Eden, Buffon theorized, new diets and climates ‘degenerated’ them.      Continue reading

GUYANA Politics: That “Bloated” Electoral List – by Ralph Ramkarran 

  – Conversation Tree Blog 

In 2010 I wrote an article on the overseas vote in which I argued that the Constitution of Guyana permitted all Guyanese citizens over the age of 18 to vote. Since there was no residence stipulation, Guyanese residing overseas have a right to vote. As readers would imagine, it elicited some controversy. I was a member of the leadership of the PPP at that time.

Mr. Robert Corbin, then leader of the PNCR, in a masterful display of irony, accused the PPP of seeking to re-introduce the overseas vote which, incidentally, the PNC had facilitated and grossly manipulated in the 1968 elections so much so that voters were registered as residing at the address of a horse pasture in the UK.        Continue reading

U.S.A: Georgia mocks democracy by criminalizing giving food and water to voters in line – By Mohamed Hamaludin

It would take a special breed of human beings to pass a law making it a crime to offer water and food to another human in need, such as while waiting in line to vote. that is what Georgia’s Republicans in control of the state have done as part of a new law intended to stave off non-existent electoral fraud.

For good measure, Gov. Brian Kemp, flanked by six European American men, signed the bill, in private, on March 25, within hours of its passage, a painting of a slave plantation in the background. And when Democratic State Rep. Park Cannon, an African American, knocked on his door to be let in to witness the signing, state troopers arrested, charged and literally hauled her off to jail.    Continue reading

BOOK REVIEW: Kimani Nehusi’s A People’s Political History of Guyana, 1838-1964 – By: Eusi Kwayana

Kimani Nehusi’s A People’s Political History of Guyana, 1838-1964 – (Hansib, 2018)
Book Review by Eusi Kwayana

This is a rather late review of a significant work of Guyanese history by Dr. Kimani Nehusi which he titled A People’s Political History of Guyana, 1838-1964 and published in 2018. This delay is regreted. It is regreted especially because the reviewer has had a long acquaintance with the scholar’s efforts to identify moments of consciousness as they emerged and became perceptible among various classes of the colonized peoples of Guyana. This concern had engaged the scholar’s pursuits even while he was in undergraduate study at the University of Guyana and had begun to interview elders available to him across the society and make careful notes.        Continue reading