Category Archives: Racial Conflict

Black History Month: The enduring grace of Dr. Phil Edwards of British Guiana (Guyana)

SPORTSNET.CA – By Stephen Loung   

Dr. Phil Edwards was a Guyanese immigrant who represented Canada in three Olympic Games between 1928 and ’36.

A middle-distance runner, Edwards earned the nickname “Man of Bronze” by winning five bronze medals across those three Games. He was Canada’s most decorated Olympian until short-track speed-skater Marc Gagnon tied his mark in 2002. Cindy Klassen later surpassed it with her sixth medal during the 2006 Winter Games.             Continue reading

Black History Month: Olaudah Equiano (1745-1797): Africa’s Superstar! – By: Dhanpaul Narine

Slave, author and fighter for abolition, Olaudah Equiano is Africa’s superstar. His memoir is a compelling account of a brutal chapter in our history.

He said that his memory furnished him with an imperfect sketch of his circumstance. But what he gave us from the narrative of his life is a classic description of the haunting separation of families, slavery, and the hand of Providence that led to his freedom, and influence in Europe, and beyond.

   Olaudah Equiano, also known as Gustavus Vassa, is Africa’s enduring superstar. He became a slave at a very young age, traveled the world, and eventually bought his freedom.        Continue reading

OPINION: Reimagining the Caribbean Diaspora: diversity, equity and inclusion – by Lear Matthews

 by Lear Matthews

 This article focusses on the English speaking Caribbean Diaspora’s experience within the context of diversity, equity and inclusion in the aftermath of recent societal unrest and institutional realignment in the United States. Informed by a concern for social justice and cross-cultural dynamics, this writer unpacks how this population has been affected by the burden of racism and xenophobia. It highlights a continuation of courageous conversations on the topic (See Guyanese Online: February 20-21, 2021).             Continue reading

OPINION: Who Am I Culturally? – by: Jean Janki Samaroo

Written by: Jean Janki Samaroo

Am I Guyanese, British-Guyanese, Indo-Guyanese, South American, Canadian, Guyanese-Canadian, or some blend of these different cultures? Is my background East-Indian, West-Indian or Indo-Caribbean? What about the fact that my geographical place of birth was South America? Am I just an eclectic person— one of mixed cultural heritages?

The simple answer is that I have been influenced by a diversity of cultures from the day I was born. Whether I’m definitely one thing or the other is worth questioning but the answer that I have will be different to that of another person from the same background. Guyanese are not all the same just as Canadians are not all the same. There are variables.

READ MORE: https://www.browngirldiary.com/post/who-am-i-culturally

RACISM: Ethnic minorities and colorism impacts – By Akola Thompson

 By

From the beginning of racism, colorism has existed; that is not an opinion, it is a fact. While many of us are aware of racism and its harmful impacts, a blank is usually drawn when it comes to the treatment that is meted out against persons of a dark skin tone. Colorism affects all non-white ethnicities but Black persons face the brunt of its impacts.       

When the topic of colorism is brought up, particularly in the Black community, there is a pushback against it. Persons seem to be of the belief that to speak about the realities of colorism is somehow divisive. As an already marginalized group of people, it is said that colorism dialogues seeks to push a wedge between communities. This reluctance to speak about it does not negate its everyday impacts on dark skinned people.    Continue reading

BOOK: Charles Blow’s ‘The Devil You Know: A Black Power Manifesto’ — By HOPE WABUKE

January 26, 2021 – By HOPE WABUKE

In his new book ‘The Devil You Know: A Black Power Manifesto’, Charles Blow recalls hearing Harry Belafonte give a speech.

The subject was Belafonte’s bailout of some student members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC.) Belafonte had raised $70,000 in bail money and called up his best friend Sidney Poitier  to help him deliver the money. But it was not easy. Belafonte recalled how he and Poitier were chased by the Ku Klux Klan, whose members accosted them at the airport; Belafonte and Poitier had to take off speeding in a race for their lives.        Continue reading

GUYANA-born, RUDOLPH DUNBAR (1907-1988) was a musical genius and a brilliant journalist

RUDOLPH DUNBAR – The Pioneering Musician, Campaigning Black Journalist and World War II Correspondent Who Covered The Liberation Of Europe With A Conductor’s Baton In His Knapsack

Rudolph Dunbar

Tim Crook | The Journal

GUYANA-born, RUDOLPH DUNBAR (1907-1988) was a musical genius, a brilliant journalist and indefatigable campaigner for racial justice – but post Second World War, he was discriminated against and excluded from the riches of success he so greatly deserved.

Dunbar was featured and celebrated for his appearances as a conductor and musician on BBC Radio during the 1930s.            Continue reading

Opinion: Fetishizing of the Black mixed child – By Akola Thompson

Mulatto, dougla, buffiana, blasian – there are many words that are used to describe the Black mixed child. It was not so long ago when social orders stood firmly against miscegenation that these children would be considered persona non grata. Today, the mixed Black child is portrayed as a mythical creature with powers to cure racial disharmony.

We all know the popular calls to douglarize the nation or make mixed babies to end racism today. Chances are that you’ve been one of those sounding the trumpet for mixed relationships as you see them as being revolutionarily necessary in times of such unease. Coming out of a history of illegality and rejection, the push for the Black mixed child is steadily increasing.          Continue reading

BOOK: My Lockdown Life Story Poems: Tales out of school from a Windrush generation teacher -by Barbara Roymacauley

Kindle and Paperback Editions -by Barbara Roymacauley (Author)

This poetry collection is a quick sprint through my key childhood and adolescent memories including my arrival in London from Jamaica with my mother . Reflecting also experiences of living going to school in East London, there are some portraits of schooling and parenting back in theday-50s -60s.I left school and went to a Leicester University college in the 1970s after which I have mostly been a London Teacher.  Continue reading

Commentary Is National Unity In The US An Unattainable Fantasy – By Yvonne Sam

By Yvonne Sam – Contributing Columnist

In America, as the call for national “unity” from people in the media and political classes gets louder, a stronger sense of displacement appears. Taking into consideration events, such as protests, an impeached ex-president, business closures, government-ordered quarantine, lock-downs and riots, national unity is an inexecutable illusion.

Americans were told by the so-called “unifiers” that all Trump had to do to unify the country was to go quietly into that good night, and that all Joe R. Biden has to do to help unify the country, is to make nice with Trump voters, and, above all, be the liberal/moderate that he has displayed in public, during his four decades of government service. What an oxymoron.      Continue reading