British Guiana Colonists – Historical database of residents

British Guiana Colonists

Introduction

This site contains an index to an on-going database of 18th and 19th century residents of the colonies of Berbice, Demerara, and Essequebo (with some connected relatives).

Others who have an interest in their ancestry, may claim earlier European roots in these colonies. In some cases these claims could date back to around 1580 with the earliest Portugese and Dutch settlers at Fort Kyk-over-al.

There are also those with ancestors associated with the Dutch West India Company or connected to the 1739 invitation to all nations that led many settlers, from Barbados, Antigua and other West Indian islands, to establish themselves in these colonies, then under Dutch control.  

This wave of colonisation led to improved communication and therefore more data became available following the capture of the three colonies, Berbice Essequibo, and Demerara by the British in 1781.

Taken by the French in 1782 the colonies were restored to Holland the following year. In 1796, the British again claimed the three colonies, only to cede them to Holland in the Peace of Amiens in 1802. The following year, Britain captured the colonies again and gained formal control over them in 1815. In 1831, the three colonies were consolidated as British Guiana, now Guyana. [Read more]

—  Guyanese Online Post #2190

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Comments

  • Dr. Walter Hewick  On December 11, 2012 at 9:28 pm

    An excellent piece of historical data. A great source for those interested in their English Ancestry. I noticed that the compiler mentioned my granddad’s name John Edwin Hewick, Chief Justice of Guyana and my uncle’ name. Kudos to the compiler.

  • Carl veecock  On December 13, 2012 at 7:00 am

    So odd that there are no names under V. The Veecock name was well known in British Guyana. I wonder how that name was completely omitted!

  • Larkhi  On December 13, 2012 at 8:56 pm

    So this is a list of slave owners and those who were prominently involved in enslaving and indenturing human beings?

    • Thinker  On December 17, 2012 at 6:02 am

      In all fairness, it is just a list of colonists. Nothing more, nothing less. Those who are related to them, however tenuously, can find it interesting. Apart from the Indigenous Peoples, all came to serve the interests of Capital.

  • Cyril Balkaran  On December 14, 2012 at 9:18 am

    Those who were responsible for securing Demerara, Berbice and Essequibo as one Country through Warfare with the French, Dutch, British and others were also responsible for its development and so they enslaved and indentured the human race to do so. Today we are supposedly Free at Last and what are we doing about developing the 83,000 square miles of terrority that our Masters fought for and entrusted it to us. We do not have a blueprint for development of Land either for Agriculture or for Industry. WE are impoverished for ideas and action plans and all our present day MP’s do in the Nation’s Parliament is to wrangle over power and its personal benefits! Who will demand Land Distribution among the current population and then Land Development for Agriculture. Fresh Black water of the Amazon is the fresh water that is needed to cultivate the said land mass and to transform the country into the Food basin of the Region! The Food Scarcity that is being talked about has the very potential to destroy the world through Food Riots everywhere! This land mass must not be allowed to sit idle for too long!

  • caramry  On December 31, 2014 at 8:18 am

    Since the colonists we are researching are four or five generations removed, it serves no purpose to judge them for being part of a worldwide society that still embraced slavery, wrong as we might find that. Keeping records away from descendents of colonists also keeps ancestral records away from those who may have also been descendents of the enslaved. I cannot trace my great grandmother because she was of mixed race and no records are available of her birth and no records of her birth mother are available.

  • Clif Knight  On February 20, 2017 at 12:06 pm

    If you wish to know the making of a Slave read what Joseph did for Pharaoh in Egypt, and understand, now ‘ mostly in the developed world we are all slaves. And ask where are the descendants of the 143 million that were taken into Slavery in the Arab World.

  • José Miguel  On July 14, 2018 at 10:06 am

    Did portuguese really settle in Fort-Kyk-Over-Al?

    • walter  On July 15, 2018 at 4:39 pm

      Many many years ago I was on THD ship that stopped at Kyk Over Al, met a young lady (beautiful) during our conversation, she mentioned her name was …
      Mittelholzer remember asking if she as named after EDGAR MITTE….., she mentioned were related and her family “always” lived at Kyk Over Al, maybe they did settle there???

  • Juan Cox  On July 8, 2019 at 8:41 pm

    Very interesting. I would like to find some information on my great grandfather, Charles Brandt. However, he died in the 1960’s in Georgetown Guyana. His children were Walter and Lucille Brandt.

    • Trevor  On July 8, 2019 at 10:19 pm

      Brandt sounds like a name from London or Holland.

      Where ever he may be, he is in a grave which has more gold and marble than the shacks of us, the colonized, living in shacks of Sophia, Ruimveldt and Lodge.

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