Category Archives: Politics

Black History Month: The enduring grace of Dr. Phil Edwards of British Guiana (Guyana)

SPORTSNET.CA – By Stephen Loung   

Dr. Phil Edwards was a Guyanese immigrant who represented Canada in three Olympic Games between 1928 and ’36.

A middle-distance runner, Edwards earned the nickname “Man of Bronze” by winning five bronze medals across those three Games. He was Canada’s most decorated Olympian until short-track speed-skater Marc Gagnon tied his mark in 2002. Cindy Klassen later surpassed it with her sixth medal during the 2006 Winter Games.             Continue reading

Black History Month: Olaudah Equiano (1745-1797): Africa’s Superstar! – By: Dhanpaul Narine

Slave, author and fighter for abolition, Olaudah Equiano is Africa’s superstar. His memoir is a compelling account of a brutal chapter in our history.

He said that his memory furnished him with an imperfect sketch of his circumstance. But what he gave us from the narrative of his life is a classic description of the haunting separation of families, slavery, and the hand of Providence that led to his freedom, and influence in Europe, and beyond.

   Olaudah Equiano, also known as Gustavus Vassa, is Africa’s enduring superstar. He became a slave at a very young age, traveled the world, and eventually bought his freedom.        Continue reading

OPINION: Losing way; Monday’s parliament and intensifying depravities – The GHK Lall Column

   Feb 28, 2021- Kaieteur News –  The GHK Lall Column

It was a dark and dirty week.
A fifth member of the AFC resigned from party membership, because the thinking was the group has “lost its way.” No member has said the same thing publicly, as yet, about the PNC, but I have heard the same thing also uttered quietly that the PNC has lost its way, too.

From my perspective, the new PPP government, given its leadership deceptions and membership corruptions, is yet another example of a major group that has also lost its way.        Continue reading

Trinidad: US Dollar shortage has forced businesses to seek US$ on black market

Gregory Aboud

Gregory Aoud

(Trinidad Guardian) The limited availability of foreign exchange has meant that individuals and business have had to turn to the black market for US dollars.

Several business owners told the Business Guardian that if US was required it could be purchased off market at between TT$7.50 to $8.50 for US$1.  This off market (black market) availability has led to questions about the distribution of US into the local market.

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GUYANA: Georgetown: City vending – One of the most pressing issues – Commentary

City Hall – Georgetown

By

The announcement last Thursday (February 18, 2021), that the Mayor and City Council (M&CC) was moving to implement a policy to regularise vending in Georgetown should have come as no surprise to anyone.

In fact, if anything, some might have questioned what took Mayor Ubraj Narine so long. One of the just four mayors Georgetown has had over the past three-plus decades, it was almost a given. He had to step up to address what is one of the city’s most pressing issues: vending.

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U.S.A — While ordinary Americans fight for political crumbs, the rich get richer – opinion

 By MOHAMED HAMALUDIN

The federally mandated minimum wage is $7.25 an hour but the average actual wage is $19.33; for Florida, $16.

The average hourly wage of a CEO is $369 but can be as high as $9,000. The average hourly wage of a billionaire is $1 million but can be as high as $4 million.

Billionaires numbered 565 in 2017and their combined wealth was $2.7 trillion. By 2020, in four years of the Donald Trump presidency and a year of the coronavirus epidemic, their number rose to 614 and their wealth to $2.9 trillion. By April 10, the number increased by15 to 629 and their wealth to $3.2 trillion. Meanwhile, more than 20 million Americans have had to survive on about $333 per week in jobless benefits.          Continue reading

GUYANA: MPs open Budget 2021 debates with insults and vulgarity

Speaker of the House Manzoor Nadir.

Senior Minister in the  Office of the President with responsibility for Finance, Dr. Ashni Singh, recently presented to the National Assembly and by extension the country, the largest budget it has ever seen.

During that presentation, the Senior Minister had disclosed the whopping $38.1B budget would catapult the country’s economic recovery, and improve the performance of critical sectors that were severely affected by COVID-19 shockwaves.      Continue reading

BARBADOS: COVID Paralysis Versus VS COVID Management Compared – Opinion

Submitted by Richard Petko to the Barbados Underground Blog

The past two weeks has seen a national pause and a furtherance of the pause. What are the actual goals of the pause? What are the goalposts for re-opening? What are the goals for tourism? These are all valid questions and I think they should be asked and answered. Before answering it is pertinent to see what other Caribbean jurisdictions which are considered as world class as Barbados are doing.        Continue reading

OPINION: Reimagining the Caribbean Diaspora: diversity, equity and inclusion – by Lear Matthews

 by Lear Matthews

 This article focusses on the English speaking Caribbean Diaspora’s experience within the context of diversity, equity and inclusion in the aftermath of recent societal unrest and institutional realignment in the United States. Informed by a concern for social justice and cross-cultural dynamics, this writer unpacks how this population has been affected by the burden of racism and xenophobia. It highlights a continuation of courageous conversations on the topic (See Guyanese Online: February 20-21, 2021).             Continue reading

RACISM: Ethnic minorities and colorism impacts – By Akola Thompson

 By

From the beginning of racism, colorism has existed; that is not an opinion, it is a fact. While many of us are aware of racism and its harmful impacts, a blank is usually drawn when it comes to the treatment that is meted out against persons of a dark skin tone. Colorism affects all non-white ethnicities but Black persons face the brunt of its impacts.       

When the topic of colorism is brought up, particularly in the Black community, there is a pushback against it. Persons seem to be of the belief that to speak about the realities of colorism is somehow divisive. As an already marginalized group of people, it is said that colorism dialogues seeks to push a wedge between communities. This reluctance to speak about it does not negate its everyday impacts on dark skinned people.    Continue reading