Category Archives: poverty

Venezuela: Illicit Trade Represents 21% of Venezuela’s GDP: Is This Our Post-Oil Future?

Venezuela – Click to enlarge

Tony Frangie Mawad | Caracas Chronicles

 After calculating the current annual worth of drug, gold and gasoline trafficking and port smuggling in Venezuela, a study by the local chapter of the anti-corruption nonprofit Transparency International — with estimates from Ecoanalítica, a Venezuelan economic consulting firm — concluded that these illegal economies made up 21.74% of Venezuela’s GDP last year.

“This means they are more powerful than any other economic sector right now, including oil,” says Mercedes De Freitas, Transparencia Venezuela’s executive director. “And we are talking only about the size of four of these economies, the most important ones. THERE ARE OTHER ILLICIT TRADES: Certain types of food smuggling, diesel smuggling, cooking gas trafficking, human trafficking or timber trafficking, which could be important in some regions.”       Continue reading

GUYANA pushes for architectural transformation with upcoming International Building Expo — July 22-24, 2022

GUYANA INTERNATIONAL BUILDING EXPO — July 22-24, 2022

Website: https://buildingexpo.gy/

Guyana is expecting more than 150 international and local companies to participate in the International Building Expo, set to take place July 22-24 at the National Stadium, Providence, East Bank Demerara.

The expo will create an opportunity for local, regional, and international investors to showcase innovative building and construction techniques, government said.

The country is experiencing a construction boom fueled by the offshore oil and gas operations which is creating higher demand for accommodation for tourists, investors, and industry expatriates. The government said it expects the construction sector to be propelled into a more innovative direction with this Expo.        Continue reading

GUYANA: Cabinet approves G$60,000 minimum wage for private sector employees – Pres. Ali

June 16, 2022 – https://newsroom.gy/

After two years of discussing an increase in the minimum wage of private sector employees from G$44,200 to G$60,000, President Dr Irfaan Ali on Thursday evening announced that it has been approved by the cabinet. This increase to G$60,00 is approximately US$300 per month at the exchange rate of 200-1.

“Cabinet has agreed with the recommendation of the tripartite committee and that is, we are in support of the minimum wage, that is, the $60,000…” President Ali said while addressing the 74th commemoration of the Enmore Martyrs.

The minimum wage was increased to G$44,200 in 2017 from G$35,000.              Continue reading

REFUGEES: No room for today’s ‘tired, poor, huddled masses yearning to breathe free’ — By Mohamed Hamaludin

By MOHAMED HAMALUDIN

The number of free African Americans increased from around 60,000 in 1790 following the Revolutionary War to about 300,000 in 1830 and European Americans feared they would help the still enslaved to escape or revolt and believed anyhow that they were an inferior race who would be better off elsewhere. The American Colonization Society and others came up with this solution: send them to Africa.

African Americans, in general, objected strongly, with some pointing out that they had lived in the United States for generations and were “no more African than white Americans were European,” as Wikipedia puts it. Shame upon the guilty wretches that dare propose and all that countenance such a proposition,” abolitionist and scholar Frederick Douglass declared. “We live here—have lived here—have a right to live here and mean to live here,”

Still, 4,571 African Americans were relocated between 1820 and 1843 to West Africa, in a collection of settlements with names such as Mississippi in Africa, Kentucky in Africa and Republic of Maryland that formed the nation of Liberia by 1857. Because of diseases, only 1,819 survived. Continue reading

CANADA: Toronto Police Chief apologizes for years of systemic racism on the force

BlogTO – 15 June. 2022

Chief of Police James Ramer addressed the media on Wednesday morning, delivering a brutally honest apology in response to the Toronto Police Service’s (TPS) 2020 Race-Based Data Collection Strategy findings, admitting the frankly obvious fact that profiling and discrimination against members of racialized communities are a systemic issue on the force.

The Toronto Police and all law enforcement services in Ontario were directed to begin collecting race-based data in instances of reportable use of force back in 2019, leading the TPS Board to approve a “Race-Based Data Collection, Analysis and Public Reporting” policy with an aim to identify a problem that was already plainly obvious to even the most casual observer.

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HAITI — Many culprits are to blame for Haiti’s long history of suffering – by Mohamed Hamaludin

By MOHAMED HAMALUDIN

Heartbreaking news coming out of Haiti paints a picture of a nation engulfed by gang violence “which has placed the capital in a state of siege,” the United Nations said in early May, Agence France-Presse (AFP) reported. The horror includes “beheadings, chopping and burning of bodies and the killing of minors accused of being informants for a rival gang.” Children as young as 10 are subjected to sexual violence, including gang rape. Doctors Without Borders closed its 15-year-old hospital.

The gangs “operate like de facto governments, with their own courts, ‘police stations and residential fees for everything from electricity to school permits,” The New York Times reported. The 11,000-member National Police is much too small for a country of 11 million; experts say at least 30,000 officers are needed.

The seeds of this tragedy were, however, planted long ago and there are much more significant culprits to blame than just thugs with guns and no regard for life. France and the United States top the list, along with at least two rapacious foreign banks, sundry despots, corrupt officials and catastrophic natural disasters.              Continue reading

GUYANA: Baramita: Region 1: Golf For Guyana – Port Perry. ON. Canada – September 10th 2022

Click to enlarge

GOLF TOURNAMENT FOR BARAMITA. GUYANA

Saturday, September 10, 2022
Sunnybrae Golf Club: 1430 King Street, Port Perry, ON

Join us for a round of golf to raise funds for Baramita, an indigenous community in northern Guyana.

This community is living in extreme poverty with 95% of the population living in makeshift tents with little access to a reliable food source or safe drinking water. In 2021, together we completed a Community Library. The new library is bright and cheerful and is stocked with books and supplies that the children in the community now have access to.

Our golfers and sponsors also purchased backpacks and shoes for 400 children and helped fund school garden that will be breaking ground in May 2022.

This year, we will focus our attention on agriculture and education in the community and finding opportunities for families to earn sustainable incomes.

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Guyana Golf Sept 10 2022 – Details on the golf Tournament

Guyana 2022 Community Needs –  Baramita Community Information and needs

GUYANA: Cash Grants to Guyanese: “Give a man a fish” – Guest Editorial

Stabroek News

Stabroek News – Guest Editorial – June 9, 2022

Starting last year, the government has made various announcements of one-time cash grants to diverse groups for a variety of reasons; these were in addition to the contentious and inadequate one-off $25,000 distributed to each household that was meant to supplement lost earnings as a response to the economic deprivation wrought by the COVID-19 restrictions. They are also apart from the now on-again educational grant given to households with school-aged children.

The largest, to date, was that made in October last year by Vice President Bharrat Jagdeo of $250,000 to workers who had been severed when the sugar estates where they were employed were closed under the previous administration; he had estimated their number to be around 7,000.  Continue reading

MUSIC: Guyana-born Eddy Grant – Gimme Hope Jo’Anna (Live at Nelson Mandela Concert)

Eddy Grant (and Kurt Darren) – Gimme Hope Jo’Anna (Live at Nelson Mandela Concert)

This ain’t just a song it is a great anti apartheid song, highly political with deep rooted meaning. Legendary performance from the legendary Eddie Grant.

“She got a system they call apartheid it keeps a brotha inna subjection… I hear she make all the golden money to buy new weapons, any shape of guns While every mother in black Soweto fears the killing of another son” Another Great Song. Rest In Peace Nelson “Madiba” Mandela.

GUYANA: Poetry Recital: Martin Carter’s Poems – “Jail Me Quickly” – June 7. 2022 @11.00 AM Guyana

Jail me flyer.png
You are warmly invited to our annual commemoration of the birth of
Martin Carter. This year we will feature a short sequence of poems
published in New World Magazine in 1964, entitled Jail Me Quickly.

The sequence is as follows:
Black Friday1962 (‘were some who ran one way…’)
After One Year (‘So jail me quickly, clang the illiterate door…’)
What Can a Man Do More (‘How utter truth when falsehood is the truth?’)
Where are Free Men? (‘O we have endured such absurd times’)
Childhood of a Voice (‘Imagine it, the childhood of a voice…’)

The recital has been pre-recorded and lasts half an hour. It will air on YouTube at the time stated and be available to view at any point after that.
Dr Gemma Robinson provides an introduction to the collection and insights into each individual poem.
Readers are Konyo Addo, Jasper Adams, Stephanie Bowry, Stanley Greaves and Lloyd Marshall.

Moray House Trust has spent a decade working to promote Guyanese culture and public discourse. We believe that a culture thrives and
develops where ideas circulate and are robustly debated and interrogated.

Event:         Poetry Recital
Title:            Jail Me Quickly
Date:           Tuesday 7th June 2022
Time:          11.00 AM Guyana
YouTube:    https://youtu.be/T7GjxmpWaDk

Regards,
Moray House Trust

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