Category Archives: Personalities

GUYANA: Illusions of Freedom — By Mosa Telford

There is controversy surrounding COVID-19 vaccinations in Guyana. While many people are getting vaccinated, others who are vaccine hesitant are being told by their employers that they must be vaccinated or submit to weekly testing. Minister of Health Frank Anthony during a press conference on Wednesday said that the free PCR tests should be utilized by those who have been exposed to the virus.
The reality is that most Guyanese cannot afford to pay for weekly COVID-19 tests. Most people will probably comply, and some may quit their jobs.  Of course, people are split on this issue. Some are saying that employers can do what they believe will protect their employees, while others are saying that it is the violation of people’s rights to force them to become vaccinated.

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GUYANA HISTORY: FUH ALL AHWEE! – By Ted Eric Matthews 

(Was Before Emancipation, Was Before Haiti)

FUH ALL AHWEE! – By Ted Eric Matthews 

Remember 1762? Remember Plantations Goedland and Goed Fortuin up dee Berbice River. What a brave and heroic thirty -six they were! They struck a blow for Liberty, for us—–the audacity!—–Then pursued, hunted, killed, severely punished! Remember 1763? (was before Haiti).

Remember Magdalenburg, Providence, Hollandia, Lillianburg up dee Canjie River. Break the chains! Break out! Burn! Chop! Free ourselves! Free yourselves! Run Massa run! Run missy run! Massa day done!      Continue reading

Covid-19 – the political virus – EDITORIAL By Stabroek News

Stabroek News

EDITORIAL By

Covid-19, the little virus from Wuhan, China has arguably had more of an impact on the modern world than World Wars I and II, the Great Depression and 9/11. It has resulted in the deaths of at a very minimum 4 million people and has brought political and economic systems to breaking point.

Diseases tend to do that: The Black Death, a bubonic plague, which swept through Eurasia between 1346 and 1353 killed an estimated 45% to 50% of the population. It scythed down so many rural labourers in England it caused severe labour and crop shortages. Tensions between landowners and the newly powerful workers (due to their scarcity) would eventually result in the Peasants Revolt of 1381 and the decline of the feudal system.          Continue reading

Guyana’s 60-year struggle for cheap, adequate and reliable – By Ralph Ramkarran

  By

The economy Guyana inherited at Independence in 1966 has remained largely unchanged. Throughout the period Guyana was a primary producer of bauxite, sugar, rice, timber and gold. The fortunes of some industries have improved while those of others have declined, and a few added, like fisheries.

The absence of cheap, adequate and reliable electricity was recognized as one important reason for the failure to industrialize.   In this new era, as in the past, Guyana can never attain its full economic potential unless the production and delivery of electricity is vastly improved.          Continue reading

Emancipation Day 2021 -President Ali hails contribution of Afro-Guyanese

President Infaan Ali

— recommits to establishment of ‘One Guyana Commission’

ALMOST two centuries after the abolition of the most heinous crime against humanity, slavery, Afro-Guyanese continue to catalyse growth and development, making strides in every sphere of life.

“While we take the time to pay homage to our African-Guyanese brothers and sisters on the occasion of Emancipation, we must seize this opportunity to acknowledge, to value, and to celebrate their tremendous achievements and contributions to national development,” President, Dr. Irfaan Ali, said in his message to commemorate Emancipation Day, 2021.      Continue reading

CANADA: CBC offers special programming in honour of Emancipation Day- August 1. 2021

In recognition of Emancipation Day, CBC has special programming to celebrate, educate and reflect on what freedom means.

Emancipation Day commemorates the abolition of slavery across the British Empire on Aug. 1. On that historic day in 1834, the Slavery Abolition Act came into effect, freeing more than 800,000 people of African descent in Canada and throughout the British Empire.

This year, the House of Commons voted unanimously to designate Aug. 1 as Emancipation Day across Canada.

To mark the day, Being Black in Canada, CBC Gem and CBC Arts will provide the following programming:

READ MORE: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/cbc-programming-emancipation-day-aug-1-1.6120915

GUYANA: EMANCIPATION DAY REFLECTIONS – 2021 — By Pat Dial

Today, August 1, Emancipation Day, is celebrated throughout the Caribbean including Guyana.

In 1833, the Emancipation Act was passed by the British Parliament freeing all slaves in the British Empire. But real freedom did not come until August 1, 1838, since the Emancipation Act specified a number of hours per day over several years which each slave had to serve before full freedom were finally accorded.

This period between 1833 and 1838 is known as the Apprenticeship (System) and accordingly, full freedom came only on August 1, 1838, at the end of Apprenticeship.        Continue reading

GUYANA: Embracing Blackness — By Akola Thompson

Stabroek News — By  

When I was a young child, I did not necessarily consider myself Black. Looking back, I recognize how odd of a thing it was because my immediate family members were all clearly African descendants. In my young mind though, I could not make sense of my differences when compared to the majority of the family I grew up with. I was lighter and had different features; so clearly, I had to be “different” from them, right?

With race not being something that was really discussed, I relied on knowledge I gained from studying history and popular culture to get an idea of who I was. I tried to find my face in books and screens but could not find myself represented in the images that stared back at me. I then began to take cues about my identity from the way people responded to me.          Continue reading

OPINION: Life … And Then It Is Winter  By Ed Meadows | The Reporter  + 2 Videos

By Ed Meadows | The Reporter 

Time has a way of moving quickly and catching you unaware of the passing years. It seems just yesterday when I was young, just married and embarking on a new life with my mate. Yet, in a way, it seems like eons ago, and I wonder where all the years went.

I know I lived them all. I have photos and glimpses of how it was back then and of all my hopes and dreams.      Continue reading

GUYANA: NOSTALGIA: Brown Betty Restaurant – Georgetown – By Geoff Burrowes

  – By Geoff Burrowes

Georgetown was British in its lack of pretension, its laid back style and the laid back lifestyle.

So the Brown Betty was different and exotic with its long silver bar, running down the whole length of its North side and the red leather seats, perched on shiny poles, in front of the bar and red leather booths running down the South side and with a stair case running up to  a landing against the back (West) wall with a shiny silver and red Wurlitzer Juke box dominating the landing and stairs from the lan.ding to the next floor. I never mounted those stairs and imagined  unseen delights up there!        Continue reading