Category Archives: Personalities

Guyana SPEAKS Event – Chinese in Guyana – ZOOM Meeting – September 26. 2021

Our Chinese Heritage: From Indenture to Present-Day Guyana

EVENT TIME: Sunday, 26th September at 3pm BST / 10am GYT & EDT / 11am ADT.

Please join us for a Guyana SPEAKS event reflecting on the Chinese in Guyana.  It takes place on Sunday, 26th September at 3pm BST / 10am GYT & EDT / 11am ADT.  Our distinguished speakers are: Trev Sue-A-Quan, Dr Laura Hall and Stanley Ming.  They will be covering the period of Chinese indentureship, the fascinating story of Jacob Fung-A-Pan and Abigail Yung She, and talking about the last 30 years of in-migration from China. 

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CRICKET: Serious concerns over West Indies’ 2021 T20 World Cup squad selections – Commentary

By Joseph `Reds’ Perreira & Tony McWatt – 

Joseph `Reds’ Perreira

The West Indies squad for the October 17-November 13, 2021 ICC T20 World Cup has finally been announced. The squad is as follows:

Kieron Pollard (Captain), Nicholas Pooran (Vice-Captain), Fabian Allen, Dwayne Bravo, Roston Chase, Andre Fletcher, Chris Gayle, Shimron Hetmyer, Evin Lewis, Obed McCoy, Lendl Simmons, Ravi Rampaul, Andre Russell, Oshane Thomas, Hayden Walsh.    RESERVES – Darren Bravo, Sheldon Cottrell, Jason Holder, Akeal Hosein.

Our reaction to the announced squad has been to add our voices to the prevailing clamour of consternation that has been ringing throughout the entire Caribbean Region and the Diaspora since the aforementioned names were revealed by Cricket West Indies Selection Chairman Roger Harper.      Continue reading

WORLD– Former slaving-owning nations getting reparations bills for trillions – By Mohamed Hamaludin

By MOHAMED HAMALUDIN – Final installment in a series

The African continent has sent Europe a $777 trillion reparations bill for enslaving 32 million of its people between 1450 and 1850 and theft of its minerals. The demand came during the first conference of the African World Reparations and Repatriation Truth Commission, held in Accra, Ghana. The Accra Declaration called for the debt to be paid within five years and also that African nations’ international debt be “unconditionally cancelled.”

The demand, made 21 years ago, has not been met. However, additional claims for reparations have also been made, including, in some cases, for the atrocities committed under colonialism. The Mau Mau in Kenya won a lawsuit in 2013 against the British government in a case filed by five elderly persons for torture and forced labor, Quartz Africa’s Lynsey Chutel reported. The court ordered the British government to pay $24.8 million to 5,000 Kenyans; another 40,000 filed a similar lawsuit.          Continue reading

GUYANA: The Sweet Drink Wars: Advertising: Newspapers, Posters, Cinemas, and Radio – By Vibert Cambridge


Stabroek News – By August 29, 2021

The war for the Guyanese palate was dominated by three urban companies. D’Aguiar Brothers Ltd., Wieting and Richter’s (W&R’s) Cold Storage and Ice Depot, and the Rahaman Soda Factory deployed a wide range of traditional and innovative tactics. This installment introduces some of the advertising from the mid-1940s to the late-1970s when a severe foreign exchange crisis crippled the Guyanese economy.

Most of the advertising used by Pepsi-Cola and Coca-Cola in British Guiana between the end of World War II and the 1960s was initially developed for the U.S. market. As the examples from the British Guianese newspapers of that era show, Pepsi-Cola and Coca-Cola’s newspaper advertisements were dominated by images of Caucasian women and men in comfortable post-World War II U.S. middle-class contexts. This represented the privileging of Caucasian norms of attractiveness, modernity, progress, leisure, and sophistication. When African American faces started to represent the Pepsi-Cola and Coca-Cola brands in the United States because of the civil rights struggle and efforts to increase market share, those changes were also evident in the advertising and marketing materials sent to the colony.

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Guyana Ministry of Foreign Affairs : Diaspora Conference Webinar – September 8, 2021 – Presentation

Diaspora Conference Webinar – September 8, 2021

On behalf of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, we want to thank you for attending the webinar on September 8, 2021. Even if you did not attend you could have an idea of the event by downloading the PowerPoint presentation below.

We look forward to your participation in future events.

Please find Ms. Rosalinda Rasul’s PowerPoint presentation on the link below:

PowerPoint Presentation – Diaspora Update Webinar 8 September 2021

Kind regards,

Diaspora Unit

Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation

  • “Takuba Lodge”
  • 254 South Road & Shiv Chanderpaul Dr.,
  • Georgetown, Guyana
  • +592 226-1606-8 ext. 249, 310, 342, 262

USA: The Future Of American Power – By: Arundhati Roy | The Economist  

Arundhati Roy | The Economist  

This By-invitation commentary is part of a series by a range of global thinkers on the future of American power, examining the forces shaping the country’s standing.

IN FEBRUARY 1989 the last Soviet tank rolled out of Afghanistan, its army having been decisively defeated in a punishing, nearly decade-long war by a loose coalition of mujahideen, who were trained, armed, funded and indoctrinated by the American and Pakistani Intelligence services.

By November that year the Berlin wall had fallen and the Soviet Union began to collapse. When the cold war ended, the United States took its place at the head of a unipolar world order. In a heartbeat, radical Islam replaced communism as the most imminent threat to world peace. After the attacks of September 11th, 2001: The political world as we knew it spun on its axis. And the pivot of that axis appeared to be located somewhere in the rough mountains of Afghanistan.         Continue reading

TRAVEL: Caribbean tourism recovery punctured by new coronavirus spike

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Just as tourism was beginning to show signs of recovery, the Caribbean has been hit by a new wave of coronavirus infections that is causing lockdowns and flight cancellations and overwhelming hospitals.

Countries including Jamaica, Martinique, The Bahamas, Barbados, St. Lucia, and Dominica have seen a rise in cases fueled by the highly contagious Delta variant and a relaxation of earlier restrictions. Misinformation spread on social media has also contributed to a low vaccine uptake.        Continue reading

WAR and CONFLICT: Another One Bites the Dust in Afghanistan – Opinion

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Another One Bites the Dust

For the better part of three thousand years, the bleak yet beautiful land we now call Afghanistan has enticed, entrapped, and ultimately humiliated one ambitious conquering power after another.  The United States of America is merely the latest in a long list of hubristic nations to see its vainglorious pretensions laid low by Afghanistan’s daunting terrain and deadly history. 

 As the last Americans on the ground scurry to escape before the curtain finally drops on a twenty-year, two trillion-dollar war, we leave behind nothing but blood and ignominy.  Thousands of Afghans who believed our promises have been betrayed.  Thousands of American families, whose daughters and sons were told they were fighting for a noble purpose, will be left with nothing but flag-draped coffins.  Friends and foes around the world  will see in this debacle dispositive proof — as if any more were needed — that the United States is neither the great power it pretends to be nor the trustworthy ally it claims to be.      Continue reading

Commentary: The Caribbean’s ‘big fish small fish’ problem – By: David Jessop

Some years ago, the then Prime Minister of Barbados, the late Owen Arthur, told me that unless regional leaders could agree on how to achieve economic parity between CARICOM’s member states, a viable Caribbean Single Market and Economy (CSME) might not be attainable.

During a lengthy exchange he suggested that to overcome the differences in the weight, size and performance of Anglophone Caribbean nations, CARICOM’s members needed to have greater political will. That meant, he said, adopting, implementing, and sustaining measures that would rebalance relationships, enable intra-regional capital flows, and stimulate economic complementarities. Without this, he said, it would be hard to make competitive and economically secure a geographically-fragmented region.          Continue reading

Guyana Medical Relief (GMR) – Twilight Dinner Fundraiser- October 2, 2021 – Pasadena CA