Category Archives: Environment

Environment: Stop Polluting our Rivers! – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

 – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

The rivers of the world are dying. Each day tons of waste is dumped in rivers. As the waterways groan and belch under the weight of garbage and chemicals official action takes the form of lip service. Communities suffer and the planet gets closer to the day when the wheels will grind to a halt.

In June 2015, the waters of La Pasion River in Guatemala were covered with dead and poisoned fi sh. It was found that the river was contaminated by malathion, an agricultural insecticide that is said to be 100 times more poisonous than sewage. The community that is affected is Sayaxche where oil plantations occupy large tracts of land.

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Guyana Tourism: British national finds his oasis in Guyana’s Rupununi Savannah – By Tangerine Clarke

Founder, Managing Director, Englishman, Colin Edwards welcomes First Lady of Guyana, H.E. Sandra Granger to Rock View Lodge, Annai, Rupununi Savannahs.
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Fifty years ago when Colin Edwards left his homeland of England and arrived in Guyana to work as a Voluntary Service Overseas (VSO), at the Ministry of Agriculture, he never imagined in his wildest dreams that he would become the founder and managing director of Rock View Lodge, one of the country’s most beautiful eco-tourism destinations, in Annai, Rupununi Savannahs, Region 9.

Rock View Lodge celebrates 27 years of pristine beauty, a hidden gem between the Amerindian villages of Annai and Rupertee where the Pakaraima foothills meet the tropical rainforest.          Continue reading

Brazil’s indigenous tribes protest Bolsonaro assimilation plan

President Jair Bolsonaro plans threaten their reservation lands.

Brazil’s indigenous tribes protest Bolsonaro assimilation plan (Reuters photo)

BRASILIA, (Reuters) – Thousands of people representing the more than 300 tribes native to Brazil marched to government offices in Brasilia this past week to protest the policies of right-wing President Jair Bolsonaro that threaten their reservation lands.

Wearing body paint and headdresses made with the colorful feathers of Amazon birds, they brandished bows and arrows and beat drums while chanting resistance songs. The march comes at the end of a three-day rally in the Brazilian capital called the Free Land Encampment.            Continue reading

Launch of the Guyana Solar Challenge – By SHOS and CYEN – July 1, 2019

By Solar Head of State (SHOS) and the Caribbean Youth Environment Network (CYEN)

Solar Head of State (SHOS) and the Caribbean Youth Environment Network (CYEN) are pleased to announce the launch of the Guyana Solar Challenge – a national competition to engage and educate youth nationwide about the benefits of renewable energy.

Following the success of last year’s Jamaica Solar Challenge, SHOS is again partnering with a local chapter of CYEN to manage publicity and engagement related to the Solar Challenge.    Continue reading

Water is Everywhere in Georgetown, Guyana – By Melinda Janki

Water is Everywhere in Georgetown, Guyana — Our Disrespect for it will Kill Us — By Melinda Janki

Melinda Janki

Water is ubiquitous in Georgetown. There is a drain outside every house, flowing towards a canal. Old photos show the beauty of the waterways that comprised the original drainage system for the city.

Guyana sits on what was once known as the “wild coast” of South America. The area was a dangerous swamp that struck terror in the hearts of European adventurers seeking the fabled city of El Dorado. Even Sir Walter Raleigh is rumoured to have come here in search of gold. The name “Guiana” is said to come from an Amerindian word meaning “land of many waters”. Like many myths, it is charming but unsupported by evidence. Water is, however, a dominant motif of Guyana and certainly of Georgetown, the capital city. Water is also likely to end Georgetown’s existence before the 21st century comes to a close.

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Guyana’s Waterways – By Dave Martins

Guyana’s Waterways – By Dave Martins

Dave Martins

Stabroek News – Sunday 27 Jan 2019

Growing up in Guyana, or coming here to live, our waterways are part of your life. For me, growing up in West Demerara at Hague, in a house by the seaside, it was the rowdy Atlantic, a hundred yards away, and the long straight canal running from the village road, straight as an arrow, about a mile, past the train line, all the way to Hague Backdam where farmers planted rice and kept cattle.

Later, as we moved to live at Vreed-en-Hoop, travelling daily to school in town, it was the Demerara River, with the government ferry boats – Querriman; Lady Northcote; and the small, appropriately named, Hassar – where we would watch the few small cars on deck, with wooden chocks holding them in place. Surely they would be pitched into the sea when the Hassar rolled – and roll it did, but the chocks held.      Continue reading

The basic science for how climate change triggers severe cold weather in wintertime — The Secular Jurist

Three Worlds One Vision

By Robert A. Vella. It may seem paradoxical to laypeople that we would have severe cold weather spells in wintertime given that the world is rapidly warming up due to manmade climate change; and, climate change deniers are quick to exploit this paradox for political reasons.  But, it is true.  Global warming is increasing the incidence of extreme weather events of every kind from prolonged droughts and powerful storms to deadly heat waves and brutal cold snaps.  The following details the basic science behind the phenomenon popularly, though inaccurately, known as the “polar vortex.” The real polar vortex is something else altogether…

via The basic science for how climate change triggers severe cold weather in wintertime — The Secular Jurist

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Caribbean Has Become Much Drier, Says The Caribbean Climate Outlook Forum

BRIDGETOWN, Barbados, February 5, 2019 (CMC) – The Barbados-based The Caribbean Climate Outlook Forum (CariCOF) says since December, last year, many parts of the Caribbean have become drier.

“Major concerns exist in the southern Caribbean, including from northern Guyana to Barbados and west to the ABC Islands (Aruba, Bonaire and Curacao) for short term drought that can impact small rivers, streams and ponds, by the end of April 2019,” announced CariCOF in its February issue of the Caribbean Drought Bulletin, released here, today.             Continue reading

What do the protesters in France want? Check out the ‘official’ Yellow Vest manifesto

What do the protesters in France want? 

Defining generations: Where Millennials end and post-Millennials begin

Defining generations:

For decades, Pew Research Center has been committed to measuring public attitudes on key issues and documenting differences in those attitudes across demographic groups. One lens often employed by researchers at the Center to understand these differences is that of generation.

Generations provide the opportunity to look at Americans both by their place in the life cycle – whether a young adult, a middle-aged parent or a retiree – and by their membership in a cohort of individuals who were born at a similar time.

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