Category Archives: War and conflict

OPINION: American Economist Jeffrey Sachs – How The West Is Keeping Africa Poor – Video

Eminent American Economist Jeffrey Sachs Exposes The Truth About How The West Is Keeping Africa Poor

Africa Web TV – August 3, 2021

American economist Professor, Jeffrey Sachs exposes how America, its Western allies, the CIA and the defence industry have rigged the system to keep Africa from being prosperous. It is a stunning expose and rebuke to the present world order. Jeffrey David Sachs is an American economist, academic, public policy analyst and former director of The Earth Institute at Columbia University, where he holds the title of University Professor. He is also a renowned leader in sustainable development, a senior UN advisor and a bestselling author.*

WORLD– Former slaving-owning nations getting reparations bills for trillions – By Mohamed Hamaludin

By MOHAMED HAMALUDIN – Final installment in a series

The African continent has sent Europe a $777 trillion reparations bill for enslaving 32 million of its people between 1450 and 1850 and theft of its minerals. The demand came during the first conference of the African World Reparations and Repatriation Truth Commission, held in Accra, Ghana. The Accra Declaration called for the debt to be paid within five years and also that African nations’ international debt be “unconditionally cancelled.”

The demand, made 21 years ago, has not been met. However, additional claims for reparations have also been made, including, in some cases, for the atrocities committed under colonialism. The Mau Mau in Kenya won a lawsuit in 2013 against the British government in a case filed by five elderly persons for torture and forced labor, Quartz Africa’s Lynsey Chutel reported. The court ordered the British government to pay $24.8 million to 5,000 Kenyans; another 40,000 filed a similar lawsuit.          Continue reading

USA: Afghanistan: In The End… Bin Laden Won – By Michael Moore – Opinion

 

He couldn’t have done it without us

BY: Michael Moore –

I decided to go and meet the Taliban in the spring of 1999, two years before the 9/11 attacks. Most of us, including me, didn’t know much about the Taliban back then, nor did we want to. A decade earlier, the CIA funded and trained Muslim rebels to kick the Soviets out of Afghanistan after ten years of occupation. That made America happy — the Soviet Union defeated! Humiliated!
Our pundits called it “their Vietnam!“ like we had actually learned a single damn lesson from Vietnam. As for what was left of Afghanistan, well, who friggin’ cared?

So in 1999, the Taliban landed on my radar. They had banned kite flying and made it illegal to watch TV, two of my favorite pastimes. What was wrong with these people? I decided to go and ask them.            Continue reading

USA: The Future Of American Power – By: Arundhati Roy | The Economist  

Arundhati Roy | The Economist  

This By-invitation commentary is part of a series by a range of global thinkers on the future of American power, examining the forces shaping the country’s standing.

IN FEBRUARY 1989 the last Soviet tank rolled out of Afghanistan, its army having been decisively defeated in a punishing, nearly decade-long war by a loose coalition of mujahideen, who were trained, armed, funded and indoctrinated by the American and Pakistani Intelligence services.

By November that year the Berlin wall had fallen and the Soviet Union began to collapse. When the cold war ended, the United States took its place at the head of a unipolar world order. In a heartbeat, radical Islam replaced communism as the most imminent threat to world peace. After the attacks of September 11th, 2001: The political world as we knew it spun on its axis. And the pivot of that axis appeared to be located somewhere in the rough mountains of Afghanistan.         Continue reading

WAR and CONFLICT: Another One Bites the Dust in Afghanistan – Opinion

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Another One Bites the Dust

For the better part of three thousand years, the bleak yet beautiful land we now call Afghanistan has enticed, entrapped, and ultimately humiliated one ambitious conquering power after another.  The United States of America is merely the latest in a long list of hubristic nations to see its vainglorious pretensions laid low by Afghanistan’s daunting terrain and deadly history. 

 As the last Americans on the ground scurry to escape before the curtain finally drops on a twenty-year, two trillion-dollar war, we leave behind nothing but blood and ignominy.  Thousands of Afghans who believed our promises have been betrayed.  Thousands of American families, whose daughters and sons were told they were fighting for a noble purpose, will be left with nothing but flag-draped coffins.  Friends and foes around the world  will see in this debacle dispositive proof — as if any more were needed — that the United States is neither the great power it pretends to be nor the trustworthy ally it claims to be.      Continue reading

GUYANA: History: Atkinson Field and World War II- A Memoir 1943 to 1946 – By Ivan O. Carew

By By Ivan O. Carew

Having been born and having grown up in the capital city, Georgetown, in the county of Demerara, British Guiana, now called Guyana, I did have some knowledge of the villages on the Eastern bank of the Demerara River.

Historically Guyana was once a Dutch possession, hence many of the villages were given Dutch names that still exist to this day. To the best of my recollection there was the village of Soesdyke (Dutch) then there was Madewini (Dutch) sparsely populated in those days with a few thatch-roof houses. Beyond that was Hyde Park with a hilly terrain and  rainforest. Residents along the river banks did farming on the slopes of the hills.    Continue reading

HAITI: How Toussaint Louverture Rose from Slavery to Lead the Haitian Revolution

How did Toussaint Louverture, born into bondage in the French colony of Saint-Domingue (present-day Haiti) and enslaved for more than half his life, come to lead the most successful slave revolt in history—and help precipitate the downfall of European colonialism in the western hemisphere?

Saint-Domingue in the late 18th century thrived as the wealthiest colony in the Americas. Its sugar, coffee, indigo and cotton plantations minted money, fueled by a vast enslaved labor force. A French colony since 1697, it occupied the western half of the Caribbean island of Hispaniola, while the Spanish had colonized the eastern side, called Santo Domingo (now the Dominican Republic).        Continue reading

USA: Afghanistan: How America’s $2 trillion, Two-Decade War Ended In Chaos – Video

The Fall Of Afghanistan: How America’s $2 trillion, Two-Decade War Ended In Chaos

CNBC Report –  August 28, 2921

Twenty years of war for the United States and coalition partners in Afghanistan ended with the collapse of the Afghan government after U.S. troops withdrew from most of the country. The rapid advance of the Taliban forced an evacuation of more than 100,000 people from Afghanistan over the course of the last few weeks, and led to the deaths of 13 U.S. service members. Here’s how the fall of Afghanistan happened so quickly, and what’s next for the war-torn country.

USA: Local initiatives help counter lack of national progress on reparations – By Mohamed Hamaludin

— Fourth in a series –By Mohamed Hamaludin

A 7,000-word history of the Catholic Church in America, written in 2000 by the late Robert J. Fox, which the Catholic Education Resource Center posted online, only very briefly mentions slaves: “The abuse of Indians by white men mars the pages of American history, as does the abuse of black people as slaves.”

The account notes that the first African American Catholic bishop was James A. Healy, who headed the Portland, Maine, diocese from 1875 to 1900 and that he was the son of an Irish immigrant father and a slave mother. It does not indicate that his father, Michael Morris Healy, owned between 49 and 60 slaves on his cotton plantation and that because his mother, Mary Eliza, was a slave – whom the elder Healy bought but did not marry because that was prohibited — their son was a slave also. Bishop Healey was light-skinned enough to identify as European.    Continue reading

OPINION: Michael Moore: Afghanistan: Peeling The American Onion

 It Ain’t Over ‘Til The Last Burger King Leaves Kandahar

Photo:
A Burger King trailer arrives at Bagram Airbase in 2004 (Photo: Vincent James via Getty Images)

By Michael Moore – August 20, 2021

Most won’t say it, so I will:

America has thankfully lost another war. Let’s make this the last. 

This is nothing here to celebrate. This should only be a monumental gut-check moment of serious reflection and a desire to seek redemption for ourselves. We don’t need to spend a single minute right now analyzing how Biden has or has not messed up while bravely handling the end of this mess he was handed — including his incredible private negotiations all this week with the Taliban leaders to ensure that not a single enemy combatant from the occupying force (that would be us; e.g., U.S. soldiers and spies and embassy staff), will be harmed.            Continue reading