Category Archives: War and conflict

US Politics: Pulling Down Statues? It Dates Back to U.S. Independence – By ANDREW LAWLER

Enthusiasm for the American Revolution led colonists to burn, disfigure, and deface any symbol of Britain and its hated king.

ANDREW LAWLER | National Geographic

Fireworks, Bands, and Cookouts are essential ingredients of any Fourth of July celebration.

What is usually NOT on the menu is toppling statues, ripping down signs, or burning portraits.

But in the days following the new nation’s declaration of independence, Americans went on a frenzy of destruction that makes today’s attacks on Confederate and other symbols of white supremacy pale by comparison.        Continue reading

Message: Guyana-born Eddy Grant – A Change Is Going To Come Monologue + Videos

Message: Eddy Grant – A Change Is Going To Come – Video

Released by Ice Records – June 10, 2020

“Now in the streets there is violence and ah lots of work to be done” (Electric Avenue – 1982)

As hundreds of thousands of Black Lives Matter demonstrators take to the streets across the world to protest the recent killing of George Floyd, international recording artist Eddy Grant strikes a very different and sombre note.

In this thought-provoking monologue, ‘A Change Is Going To Come’, Grant again puts it on the line, mindful of the possible backlash to his career as an artist from his white fans and friends alike. But as he says, ‘if not now, then when.” Grant who is the international spokesperson for the Guyana Reparations Committee says “if there is going to be a change, let there be a change of significant proportions.      Continue reading

Lloyd’s of London that owned slaves in Guyana apologises; pledges financial support to Black communities

Slave Ship – loading “cargo”

Two major British companies have acknowledged their historic ties to the slave trade and pledged new financial support to black and minority ethnic communities.

Lloyd’s of London, the world’s oldest insurance market, and pub chain Greene King said in statements late Wednesday that they would take steps to make their businesses more racially inclusive and provide financial support to black and minority ethnic groups.

The companies are highlighted in a University College London database exploring the legacies of British slave ownership. Companies with links to Lloyds Banking Group, Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) and Barclays are also mentioned.        Continue reading

HISTORY: A swift goodbye to some racist imagery and policy – National Geographic

Selma Alabama Bridge -1985

TODAY’S BIG QUESTION: WINDOW DRESSING, OR THE ROAD TO CHANGE?

By Debra Adams Simmons, HISTORY Executive Editor  – National Geographic

Hope infused last week’s broad Juneteenth celebrations and U.S. Supreme Court decisions protecting nearly 700,000 “Dreamers” from deportation and the civil rights of America’s LBGTQ communities.

Statues fell, flags with Confederate symbols came down, portraits of house speakers who served in the Confederacy were removed from the U.S. Congress. Venerable brands, which have long used labels such as Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben’s, announced an end to faces on food boxes and bottles that were born in racist stereotypes. Longtime companies that worked with slavers and profited from them, such as Lloyds’ of London, apologized to the Black community and promised to make amends.          Continue reading

Black Wall Street – Tulsa Race Massacre Pogrom was 99-YEARS AGO

Tulsa. Oklahoma: “Black Wall Street” Burning

The National Museum of African American History and Culture:

BREAKING GROUND – The TULSA RACE MASSACRE -1921

  • A Long-Lost Manuscript Contains a Searing Eyewitness Account of the Tulsa Race Pogrom of 1921
  • An Oklahoma lawyer details the attack by hundreds of whites on the thriving black neighborhood where hundreds died 99 years ago

Allison Keyes | The Smithsonian Magazine

The ten-page manuscript is typewritten, on yellowed legal paper, and folded in thirds. But the words – an eyewitness account of the May 31, 1921, racial massacre that destroyed what was known as Tulsa, Oklahoma’s “Black Wall Street” – are searing.       Continue reading

TRUMPISM: The Last Gasp of White Supremacy – By: Peter Laurie | Barbados Today

Peter Laurie

Dr. Peter Laurie | Barbados Today

History will look back on the Trump presidency as the last gasp of white supremacy in the US. This is not to say that after Trump’s defeat in November white racism will cease to exist, but it will be the beginning of a revolution.

First, what do we mean by ‘white supremacy’? This is an incoherent ideology that fantasises that white people are superior to all other peoples, especially black people and Jews, and are threatened by the rising tide of people of colour.      Continue reading

USA Politics: Trump in Tulsa: City faces up to violent past ahead of rally – BBC News

Supporters of US President Donald Trump camp outside the BOK Center, the venue for his upcoming rally, in Tulsa, Oklahoma on 17 June 2020.
President Donald Trump has rescheduled his Tulsa rally to Saturday

President Donald Trump is holding his first political rally since the start of the pandemic in Tulsa, Oklahoma, this weekend. His choice of location and the date have raised tensions in a city struggling to come to terms with its history of violent racism.

On 1 June 1921, a white mob ransacked the prosperous black neighbourhood of Greenwood, killing an estimated 300 people and burning 35 blocks of homes and businesses to the ground.            Continue reading

Britain’s History: Why Churchill is accused of being a racist? …. Here is the answer.

Racial views of Winston Churchill   (from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Sir Winston Churchill

Throughout his life, Winston Churchill made numerous explicit(statements on race and his views on race contributed to his decisions and actions in British politics. From the late 20th century onwards, these attitudes resulted in a reappraisal of his life achievements and work by both British historians and the public in the context of his being Britain’s nationally celebrated wartime leader.

Churchill, author of A History of the English-Speaking Peoples, was of the view that British domination, in particular through the British Empire, was a result of social Darwinism. He had a hierarchical perspective of race, believing white people were most superior and black people the least. Churchill advocated against black or indigenous self-rule in Africa, Australia, the Americas and the Caribbean.    Continue reading

Thought for Today: A Recipe for Murder – By Rosaliene Bacchus

New post on Three Worlds One Vision ~ Guyana – Brazil – USA

The glorification of one race and the consequent debasement of another—or others—always has been and always will be a recipe for murder. There is no way around this. If one is permitted to treat any group of people with special disfavor because of their race or the color of their skin, there is no limit to what one will force them to endure, and, since the entire race has been mysteriously indicted, no reason not to attempt to destroy it root and branch.

James Baldwin in The Fire Next Time, published by Vintage Books Edition, New York, USA, 1993 (pp 82-83). Originally published by The Dial Press, New York, USA, 1963.              Continue reading

US Protests Are NOT as Bad as in 1968 – But it is Heading That Way – Max Hastings | The Times UK

       MLK Riots – Baltimore 1968

Like Nixon before him, Trump may benefit from urban disorder

Max Hastings | The Times UK

Roosevelt Street, in a black Chicago neighbourhood, early on a Saturday morning: first I saw the scorched buildings, then the wrecked cars, finally the places being looted. Above a furniture store hung a mocking sign: “Spring has Sprung!”, with a handful of figures scavenging for anything that might have been overlooked by earlier waves of pillagers.

Police cars cruised by, shotguns poking from their windows. National Guardsmen, frightened men, stood clutching rifles at every street corner. Groups of African-Americans watched indifferently as “Whitey” sweated to preserve shops and homes.

This was the scene on April 6, 1968, as riots erupted across America after the assassination of Martin Luther King. As a very young reporter, I was a witness. In those times it seemed that race, the election and the Vietnam War were tearing asunder the greatest country on earth.    Continue reading

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