Category Archives: Philosophy

OPINION: On growing older – By Geoff Burrowes

By Geoff Burrowes

       When I was young I used to say loftily “Growing old is only a matter of numbers.” As I have grown older I have realised that growing old gives you perspective. Not necessarily wisdom but definitely perspective

        For example as I have aged I find that our apartment has become magical – things like drinking glasses and knives disappear magically – sometimes they reappear sometimes they don’t.            Continue reading

BOOK: ESSENCE OF SANATANA DHARMA: Timeless and Eternal – by Damyantee Devi Dabydeen

By DAMYANTEE DEVI DABYDEEN (Author)

  • Paperback : 350 pages
  • Product Dimensions : 20.32 x 12.7 x 3.18 cm
  • Publisher : Authorspress (12 September 2020)
  • ASIN : B08HY542H6    Language: : English

About the Book: This book, Essence of Sanatana Dharma, is a work of much religious research and soul searching in the heartland of “Sanatana Dharma”. In my effort to make it as accurate as possible, I took an imaging journey into the past to discover more of what I already knew, or thought I knew, and the essence of what I would discover. It is prudent to admit this journey is a long way to go.

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GUYANA POLITICS: Why I do not write articles on Guyana – By Hubert Williams

— (Editor’s Note: This article was written nine years ago in 2011. It is long but very informative)

By Hubert Williams –

Boston, Massachusetts, October 30, 2011 — I wouldn’t have thought that it mattered very much. Or that anyone would bother to notice. Until I visited New York to participate in family celebrations over the 2011 Labour holiday weekend.

Godfrey Wray, a journalism colleague from way back and now based in the “Big Apple”, remarked on the absence of writings by me on political, social and economic developments in Guyana.

Nonetheless, Godfrey’s inquiry is haunting: why don’t I write on Guyana?  I just don’t… and have never thought I needed to explain why. However, it is my view that one has to live the reality of Guyana to write informedly about its current affairs. We who reside abroad are mere ghosts of times past.        Continue reading

Opinion: End the Nobel Peace Prize – Graeme Wood | The Atlantic

The Trump nomination shows that peace had its chance, and blew it.

Graeme Wood | The Atlantic

Trolls are a Scandinavian invention, straight from the frigid sagas of Norse mythology, but Christian Tybring-Gjedde, a Norwegian parliamentarian, swears that he is not one.

Observers of his antics this week could be forgiven for thinking otherwise. On Wednesday, he announced that he had nominated Donald J. Trump for the Nobel Peace Prize. “Can you name a person who has done more for peace than President Trump?” Tybring-Gjedde asked me, insisting that the question was a serious one.        Continue reading

WEATHER: Climate Crisis Update: Reasons for Hope in 2020 – By Rosaliene Bacchus

Stop Sign Extreme Heat Warning – Death Valley – California – USA

t is hot here in California. On August 16th, a heat wave sent temperatures soaring in Death Valley to 130℉ (54.4℃), believed to be the highest temperature recorded on Earth in over a century. With a historic wildfire season threatening life and property, Governor Gavin Newson has declared a state of emergency. On August 24th, as reported by Cal Fire, the state has had 7,002 fires this year, burning over 1.4 million acres…and growing. At the same time last year, 4,292 fires had burned 56,000 acres.

READ MORE: http://rosalienebacchus.blog/2020/08/30/climate-crisis-update-reasons-for-hope-in-2020/

Guyana owes a debt of gratitude to the Congregational churches for pioneering education for Africans

(A review of David Granger’s Congregationalism and communitarianism. The Congregational Church in post-Emancipation Guyana.)

David Granger’s Congregationalism and communitarianism. The Congregational Church in post-Emancipation Guyana recalls the historic role which Congregationalism played in the struggle of enslaved Africans for their emancipation. It is an aspect of local history which remains underreported and underappreciated.

Granger defines ‘communitarianism’ as the fusion of the evangelical constitution of Congregationalism with the Church’s communal character. It refers to the social ministry of the Church which “…emphasizes the interactions among a community of people who share a common history or purpose and who live in a shared geographic space.”          Continue reading

GUYANA: Arts on Sunday: In tribute to Ken Corsbie – By Al Creighton

Caribbean theatre began to experience very fundamental changes, formal developments, diversification, and other advancements from the end of the 1960s and through the 1970s. It is in that context that we are able to gauge the significant role of Guyanese theatre director, actor, writer, and administrator Ken Corsbie.

He has made a mark on Caribbean drama as a performer extraordinaire, and we take time to pay him tribute.        Continue reading

Obituary: Patsy Blair Robertson, diplomat, born 28 August 1933; died 17 August 2020

Influential media spokesperson for the Commonwealth whose skill and charm helped to galvanise opposition to apartheid

Patsy Robertson

Patsy Blair Robertson, diplomat, born 28 August 1933; died 18 August 2020

Victoria Brittain | The Guardian UK 

Jamaica-born, Patsy Robertson, who has died aged 86, was a prominent figure in the historic turning of the tide against Margaret Thatcher’s support for apartheid South Africa by the Commonwealth leadership, headed by Guyana-born, Sir Shridath (Sonny) Ramphal.

As Ramphal’s trusted confidante Robertson helped to shape a new UK mainstream narrative: That apartheid could not be reformed, but instead had to go. Official spokesperson for the Commonwealth from 1983 until 1994, and also director of information at the Commonwealth Secretariat from 1988, she was a brilliant communicator whose clarity and charm came to be trusted by the media, politicians and Buckingham Palace.    Continue reading

Our kind of people: … America’s black upper class and Black Lives Matter

The United States is also home to the biggest group of highly successful black folk in the world

United States Aug 22nd 2020 edition – The Economist

Lawrence Otis Graham recalls where he first met Kamala Harris, last summer, in Martha’s Vineyard. It was at the holiday home of Spike Lee, a film director, who held a $1,500-a-head fundraiser for the woman who is now number two on the Democratic ticket. “She is the new Barack Obama for us,” says the thrilled Mr Graham, an author and property lawyer from New York. By “us” Mr Graham means African-Americans, and in particular the glitziest end of African-American high society.            Continue reading

US Politics: Harris ‘electrifies’ West Indian voters — and gives Biden a new edge in Florida – Politico

The Black West Indian diaspora community is a little-discussed but increasingly influential slice of the electorate of the nation’s biggest swing state.

LAUDERHILL, Fla. — Almost as soon as Kamala Harris became the first woman of Jamaican-Indian descent to be nominated for vice president, a mock White House menu of oxtail and jerk chicken cropped up on a West Indian diaspora Facebook group called Soca de Vote.

Calls from Caribbean radio show hosts flooded the Biden campaign from South Florida. And a jolt of excitement shot through the crowd of early vote poll workers at the Lauderdhill Mall, in the midst of Broward County’s growing Jamaican community.

Read more: https://www.politico.com/news/2020/08/15/kamala-harris-west-indian-voters-395554