Category Archives: Technology

EDUCATION: COVID-19: Colleges and Universities are facing possible financial disaster

COVID-19 upends the college experience in the USA – Video

ABC News’ Terry Moran reports on college students pushing for tuition refunds during the pandemic, while some universities face financial pain.

EDUCATION: UK universities facing possible financial disaster, research says

After-effects of coronavirus outbreak could affect one in 20 students and cause steep job cuts

New graduates at a UK university.
 Estimates found that the UK higher education sector will endure losses of between £3bn and £19bn in 2020-21. Photograph: Bailey-Cooper Photography/Alamy Stock Photo 

As many as 13 British universities could face financial disaster from the after-effects of the coronavirus outbreak, affecting one in 20 students in the UK and causing steep job cuts, according to research.    Continue reading

Canada: Five Municipalities call for 5G Moratorium: Niagara Falls and Ontario Elected Officials Concerned About Safety

— Opposition to 5G is WORLDWIDE.

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There’s no doubt that other sources of wireless and Electromagnetic Radiation (aka “Electrosmog”) can cause and have caused biological and environmental problems too.  However, experts continue to warn that adding 5G to already dangerous levels of “Electrosmog” is a recipe for disaster (see 12, 34).

Kudos to these Canadian municipalities for calling for moratoriums:  CoaticookSutton, Pike River, and Mont-Saint-Hilaire, Quebec and also to elected officials in Niagara Falls and Ontario for raising valid health and safety concerns.          Continue reading

Covid-19: why the economy could fare worse than you think | The Economist – Video

Three months after lockdown was relaxed in China, its economy is now running at around 90% of normal levels. Although 90% may sound fine, for many it could be catastrophic…. especially if the level of economic recovery is even lower.

Read more here: https://econ.st/2AeZ86k

Britain’s History: Why Churchill is accused of being a racist? …. Here is the answer.

Racial views of Winston Churchill   (from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Sir Winston Churchill

Throughout his life, Winston Churchill made numerous explicit(statements on race and his views on race contributed to his decisions and actions in British politics. From the late 20th century onwards, these attitudes resulted in a reappraisal of his life achievements and work by both British historians and the public in the context of his being Britain’s nationally celebrated wartime leader.

Churchill, author of A History of the English-Speaking Peoples, was of the view that British domination, in particular through the British Empire, was a result of social Darwinism. He had a hierarchical perspective of race, believing white people were most superior and black people the least. Churchill advocated against black or indigenous self-rule in Africa, Australia, the Americas and the Caribbean.    Continue reading

Business: Industry in Africa… Will it bloom? – The Economist

How manufacturing might take off in Africa

It won’t be the same as it was in East Asia

It seemed a wise pick. Lewis was astute, respected, and trusted in anti-colonial circles. Later, he would win a Nobel prize for economics (the first black person to do so). In a landmark paper, he argued that in developing economies people were poor because they were in the wrong jobs: move them from subsistence farms into factories and commercial farms and the economy would grow.   Note: Sir William Arthur Lewis (23 January 1915 – 15 June 1991) was from St. Lucia – (Read more in Wikipedia)

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Caribbean: The Captains of Industry Have Failed Us – By Adrian Loveridge

From the Adrian Loveridge Column – Barbados

Take one, if not our largest, food wholesale and retail distribution entities as an example. (Here he is talking about Massy Stores in Barbados)

If they only had spent a fraction of the millions ploughed into installing new brand signage and  instead created and managed an online website/e-business platform where people could select, order and pay for basic essentials from the safety of their own homes and have those items delivered in controlled circumstances. Such a move certainly would have helped protect employment, both for the company and its suppliers.          Continue reading

Video: Guyana: COAST LAND Sea Walls Failing – A REEL Guyana Documentary

Video: Guyana: COAST LAND – A REEL Guyana Documentary

Coast Land is a Guyanese documentary that speaks to the vulnerability of the country’s coastal region which is the home to the majority of the population. It examines the effects of rising sea levels and cyclical erosion which results in massive overtopping and disruption of livelihoods.

The Future We Choose: Surviving the Climate Crisis by Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett-Carnac

From Three Worlds One Vision – ~ Guyana – Brazil – USA

Based on NOAA’s 140-year climate record, 2019 is the second-hottest year on Earth, after 2016. In their book, The Future We Choose: Surviving the Climate Crisis (Knopf 2020), Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett-Carnac, architects of the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement, remind us that we live in a critical decade. If we the people of Earth fail to attain our goal of halving our carbon emissions by 2030, it would be highly unlikely that we will attain net zero emissions by 2050.

They invite us “to take part in creating the future of humanity, confident that despite the seemingly daunting nature of the challenge, collectively we have what it takes to address climate change now” (xxi).

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Video: Covid-19: why the economy could fare worse than you think | The Economist

Covid-19: why the economy could fare worse than you think | The Economist

Three months after lockdown was relaxed in China, its economy is now running at around 90% of normal levels. Although 90% may sound fine, for many it could be catastrophic.

Read more here: https://econ.st/2AeZ86k

 

Coronavirus is grounding the world’s airlines – A hard landing – The Economist

 The aviation industry may not fully recover from the effects of the pandemic

Business – The Economist Magazine

IT IS NO surprise that the industry clobbered hardest by the covid-19 pandemic is the one responsible for helping spread it to the four corners of the Earth. But the speed and depth of the nosedive which airlines have taken is nevertheless breathtaking. In a memo to staff on March 13th, entitled “The Survival of British Airways”, the carrier’s boss, Alex Cruz, spoke of “a crisis of global proportions like no other we have known” (for more coverage of the pandemic, see our coronavirus hub). Most of the industry should pull through if the situation lasts one or two quarters. Any longer, and the future of air travel could be altered for good.      Continue reading

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