Category Archives: Technology

Have smartphones killed the art of conversation? – commentary

Have smartphones killed the art of conversation?

So we’ve gone off voice calls yet spend hours glued to our phones. But it’s simply that the rules of conversation have been redrawn in the age of WhatsApp, Snapchat and emojis
Woman on smartphone on escalator
 Most of the time we spend on our phones is used for chatting – via myriad new ways of communicating. 

News of the un-newsy kind this week, fresh from an Ofcom study designed to confirm a belief in our worst selves: we are a nation addicted to smartphones but are repelled by the idea of making or taking voice calls.

Is this the death of conversation? Not quite, but it’s certainly more than a blip in the cultural history of communication: in 2017, for the first time, the number of voice calls – remember, those things you did with your actual voice on your actual phone – fell in the UK. Meanwhile, internet addiction keeps growing, presumably because we haven’t quite worked out what to do with all those hours we’re saving on talking.                            Continue reading

Disruptive technologies: The 6 Forces Transforming the Future of Healthcare – Infographic

The 6 Forces Transforming the Future of Healthcare – Infographic

Disruptive technologies are advancing healthcare at an extraordinary pace.

By 2020, there will be 50 billion devices connected to the internet, and many of these devices will be tracking the health data of individuals. This will empower consumers in an exciting way, but it will also fundamentally shift how healthcare companies work and interact with their customers.

Today’s infographic comes to us from Publicis Health and it is the introduction to a seven-part series about the future of healthcare, and how companies will have to adapt to stay relevant.

THE CHANGING CUSTOMER

The smartphone boom has changed the consumer experience in practically every industry, and it is now cascading into the healthcare market:                 Continue reading

STEMGuyana’s National Scratch Coding League In Full Swing

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STEMGuyana’s National Scratch Coding League In Full Swing

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Team Deaf Association

Fifteen teams representing schools, community clubs and religious organizations in regions 3, 4, 6, 7 and 10 are participating in Guyana’s first Nationwide Robot and Coding technology competition. This first program of its kind in Guyana, serves as a pilot to gauge the interest of participants and to help organizers work out potential issues associated with automating and organizing a nationwide competition among teams so widely dispersed in Guyana.

Organizer Karen Abrams stated that, “students will learn critical soft skills like collaboration, communication and conflict resolution while strengthening their academic knowledge, critical thinking, problem solving and technical skills. There is simply no downside to youth participation in this exciting new competition” Abrams noted that, “the pilot league was launched to expose and engage our young people in STEM related activities and then careers. What we have found is that, the more engaged they are, the more they learn, the more they are able to grasp pretty complicated concepts. We are preparing them for future which is unknown but which we bet will be kinder to those young people who are comfortable with the backend of technology”

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The negatives of ICT are now affecting all of us – By Adam Harris

The negatives of ICT are now affecting all of us

Jul 15, 2018  Features / Columnists,- By Adam Harris

When I was a boy growing up I heard talk about robots taking over jobs that people were doing. It sounded like science fiction, but it was not long before it became reality. People were afraid of the technology because they saw themselves being put on the sidelines.

It turned out that as technology developed new jobs appeared. The centres that produced cars introduced robots. Soon robots controlled the assembly line and of course, cars were produced faster and with near impeccable finishes.          Continue reading

ExxonMobil Foundation Invests US$10M in Guyana for Research, Sustainable Employment and Conservation

ExxonMobil Foundation Invests US$10 Million in Guyana for Research, Sustainable Employment and Conservation

  • New collaboration established between ExxonMobil Foundation, Conservation International and University of Guyana
  • Program to advance Guyana’s sustainable economy through investments in education, research, sustainable management and conservation of the country’s vast ecosystems
  • Part of ExxonMobil’s long-term investment in supporting local priorities in Guyana

July 02, 2018 10:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time

IRVING, Texas & GEORGETOWN, Guyana–(BUSINESS WIRE)–ExxonMobil Foundation said today that it will contribute US$10 million to a new collaboration with Conservation International and the University of Guyana to train Guyanese for sustainable job opportunities and to expand community-supported conservation.     Continue reading

Economists worry we aren’t prepared for the fallout from automation

Economists worry we aren’t prepared for the fallout from automation

Too much time discussing whether robots can take your job; not enough time discussing what happens next

Are we focusing too much on analyzing exactly how many jobs could be destroyed by the coming wave of automation, and not enough on how to actually fix the problem? That’s one conclusion in a new paper on the potential effects of robotics and AI on global labor markets from US think tank, the Center for Global Development (CGD).

The paper’s authors, Lukas Schlogl and Andy Sumner, say it’s impossible to know exactly how many jobs will be destroyed or disrupted by new technology. But, they add, it’s fairly certain there are going to be significant effects — especially in developing economies, where the labor market is skewed toward work that requires the sort of routine, manual labor that’s so susceptible to automation. Think unskilled jobs in factories or agriculture.

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But, Seriously, Where Are the Aliens? – Derek Thompson | The Atlantic

But, Seriously, Where Are the Aliens?

Humanity may be as few as 10 years away from discovering evidence of extraterrestrial life. Once we do, it will only deepen the mystery of where alien intelligence might be hiding.

Derek Thompson | The Atlantic

Enrico Fermi was an architect of the atomic bomb, a father of radioactivity research, and a Nobel Prize–winning scientist who contributed to breakthroughs in quantum mechanics and theoretical physics. But in the popular imagination, his name is most commonly associated with one simple, three-word question, originally meant as a throwaway joke to amuse a group of scientists discussing UFOs at the Los Alamos lab in 1950: Where is everybody?

Fermi wasn’t the first person to ask a variant of this question about alien intelligence. But he owns it. The query is known around the world as the Fermi paradox. It’s typically summarized like this:     Continue reading

Guyana: The Country That Wasn’t Ready to Win the Lottery

The Country That Wasn’t Ready to Win the Lottery

Oil rigs and production

Guyana just discovered it owns enough oil to solve all its problems — and cause even bigger ones.

Micah Maidenberg, Manuela Andreoni  | Foreign Policy

GEORGETOWN, Guyana — Amid the narrow streets and rusty docks of Georgetown, the quiet capital of Guyana, the first signs of an oil boom are visible. Steel pipe destined for deep-water projects can be seen stacked on wharves near the city center. Over at the Marriott, the country’s only five-star hotel, the bar fills up throughout the day with Brazilian oil workers and American contractors. Boats embark from a new depot on the Demerara River, ferrying supplies to oil projects hundreds of miles from the coast.

Driving much of this activity is ExxonMobil. Three years ago, the company’s Guyana subsidiary found crude in sandstone reservoirs about 120 miles offshore, the first of a string of offshore discoveries that have raised the country’s reserves to an estimated 3.2 billion barrels from nothing at all. Decades of dry wells had made such a cache impossible to imagine.     Continue reading

ExxonMobil confirms 8th oil discovery offshore Guyana at the Longtail-1 well

ExxonMobil confirms 8th oil discovery offshore Guyana at the Longtail-1 well

Stenna Carron drillship

…company to add another exploration vessel offshore Guyana 

ExxonMobil in a statement on Wednesday said it made its eighth oil discovery offshore Guyana at the Longtail-1 well, creating the potential for additional resource development in the southeast area of the Stabroek Block.

According to the US based oil giant, the Stena Carron drillship commenced drilling on May 25, 2018 and the Longtail-1 well was safely drilled to 18,057 feet (5,504 meters) depth in 6,365 feet (1,940 meters) of water, where they subsequently encountered approximately 256 feet (78 meters) of high-quality, oil-bearing sandstone reservoir.   Continue reading

Guyana: ExxonMobil reconfirms March 2020 for first barrel of oil production

Guyana: ExxonMobil reconfirms March 2020 for first barrel of oil production

Vice President of ExxonMobil Development Company, Lisa Walters presents a model oil barrel to Minister of Natural Resources, Raphael Trotman.

ExxonMobil on Tuesday June 12, 2018 reconfirmed that Guyana will pump up its first barrel of oil in March 2020, even as the Guyana government continued to fend off criticisms of the 2016 production sharing agreement.

Vice President of ExxonMobil Development Company, Lisa Walters said work was well advanced by several companies in Singapore, Brazil and the United States Gulf Coast to ensure that commercial oil production begins in less than two years. “We are on track for first oil in March of 2020,” she said. “In just a little over a year and a half, the Liza Destiny will deliver its first oil to its first tanker offshore,” she added.     Continue reading

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