Category Archives: colonialism

AFRICA: Why France faces so much anger in West Africa – “Neo-colonial arrogance” – BBC News

By Paul Melly – Africa analyst – Published

It all started so positively. Where have things gone wrong? Why does France now appear so unpopular in Africa?

French President Emmanuel Macron has increased aid to the continent, begun the return of cultural artefacts stolen during the colonial wars and reached out beyond the usual inter-government ties to engage younger generations and civil society.

He has kept French troops in the Sahel to fight the jihadist militants that kill so many local civilians, police and soldiers and supported the regional bloc Ecowas as it tries to defend electoral politics against military takeovers.

Yet his country is now the target of embittered African complaints and criticism on a scale that is probably unprecedented.     

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REFUGEES: No room for today’s ‘tired, poor, huddled masses yearning to breathe free’ — By Mohamed Hamaludin

By MOHAMED HAMALUDIN

The number of free African Americans increased from around 60,000 in 1790 following the Revolutionary War to about 300,000 in 1830 and European Americans feared they would help the still enslaved to escape or revolt and believed anyhow that they were an inferior race who would be better off elsewhere. The American Colonization Society and others came up with this solution: send them to Africa.

African Americans, in general, objected strongly, with some pointing out that they had lived in the United States for generations and were “no more African than white Americans were European,” as Wikipedia puts it. Shame upon the guilty wretches that dare propose and all that countenance such a proposition,” abolitionist and scholar Frederick Douglass declared. “We live here—have lived here—have a right to live here and mean to live here,”

Still, 4,571 African Americans were relocated between 1820 and 1843 to West Africa, in a collection of settlements with names such as Mississippi in Africa, Kentucky in Africa and Republic of Maryland that formed the nation of Liberia by 1857. Because of diseases, only 1,819 survived. Continue reading

HAITI — Many culprits are to blame for Haiti’s long history of suffering – by Mohamed Hamaludin

By MOHAMED HAMALUDIN

Heartbreaking news coming out of Haiti paints a picture of a nation engulfed by gang violence “which has placed the capital in a state of siege,” the United Nations said in early May, Agence France-Presse (AFP) reported. The horror includes “beheadings, chopping and burning of bodies and the killing of minors accused of being informants for a rival gang.” Children as young as 10 are subjected to sexual violence, including gang rape. Doctors Without Borders closed its 15-year-old hospital.

The gangs “operate like de facto governments, with their own courts, ‘police stations and residential fees for everything from electricity to school permits,” The New York Times reported. The 11,000-member National Police is much too small for a country of 11 million; experts say at least 30,000 officers are needed.

The seeds of this tragedy were, however, planted long ago and there are much more significant culprits to blame than just thugs with guns and no regard for life. France and the United States top the list, along with at least two rapacious foreign banks, sundry despots, corrupt officials and catastrophic natural disasters.              Continue reading

BRITAIN: COLONIALISM: Home Office Tried To ‘sanitise’ Staff Education Module On Colonialism – The Guardian UK

Disagreements have led to delay in course rollout as civil servants think empire material ‘too controversial’

Amelia Gentleman | The Guardian UK

Civil servants have attempted to “sanitise” a Home Office teaching module on race, empire and colonialism, according to those involved in devising a mandatory course on British history for the department’s 36,000 employees.

Disagreements have led to a year-long delay in the rollout of the project, which was due to be launched in June 2021. Home Office civil servants are understood to be nervous that some of the proposed material addressing issues of race, colonialism and empire is “too controversial” and have urged academics to tone down some of the content.                    Continue reading

LETTER: “Giveaway of Guyana’s gold deposits” – Gold Mining in Guyana – By Eusi Kwayana

LETTER TO THE EDITOR –   By Eusi Kwayana

Unlike Financial Representatives (MP’s) , A.R.F. Webber and Joseph Eleazer, and other members of the Popular Party  of British Guiana in 1920’s, the present government is very ready to hand over to extractors Guyana’s most precious assets. The oil giveaway and scandal is still being exposed as the most unpatriotic agreement signed by any government anywhere on the planet in the history of mining.

Not only citizens, such as Mr. Glenn Lall, have exposed the lopsided giveaway of Guyana’s wealth to the oil company ExxonMobil and its partners, but financial experts long acquainted with oil industry have taken the same position.        Continue reading

BOOK: Beyond Bourda Green: a memoir – by Percy Haynes (Author)

Beyond Bourda Green Memoir

Beyond Bourda Green: a memoir – Kindle Edition

Born in a tenement yard in the British colony of Guiana (now Guyana) on the shoulder of South America, Percy Haynes, in Beyond Bourda Green, writes about the changes in his homeland and people during the transition to an independent nation. His multi-faceted career as Journalist, Communications Expert, University Lecturer and Foreign Service Officer enables him to tell a fascinating story about his childhood memories, his experiences in finding his place in the world and the birth pangs of the new nation.          Continue reading

Canada’s Charter Turned 40 On April 17, 2022 – And It’s Still As Radical and Enigmatic As It Was In 1982

The Queen signed Canada’s Constitution in Ottawa on April 17, 1982. While the notwithstanding clause gives governments a unique way to override basic rights, Supreme Court judges have had a broad mandate to set out what those rights are

SEAN FINE – Justice Writer | Globe and Mail Toronto  

For 40 years the Charter of Rights and Freedoms has been a wild ride in a leaky boat.  

Canada is the only major democracy with a constitution that permits governments to override basic rights. Retired Supreme Court judge John Major calls it a “boat with a big hole in the bottom.”

Yet that uniquely Canadian boat, hesitating here, plunging ahead there and reversing course at will, continues on its tumultuous, country-changing journey.    Continue reading

BOOK: The Girl from Lamaha Street: By Sharon Maas

—  A Guyanese girl at a 1960s English boarding school and her search for belonging

ORDER FROM AMAZON BOOKS

An incredibly movingtruly inspiring story of the power of determination. An absolutely stunning read.’ Katharine Birbalsingh

Fascinating and poignant… an astoundingly honest and intimate memoir.’ Angela Petch

Perhaps it’s true that absence makes the heart grow fonder. Perhaps it’s true that you only know what you truly love when you no longer have it. But I wouldn’t have known any of this if I hadn’t left it all behind to discover where my home truly was…

Growing up in British Guiana in the 1950s, Sharon Maas has everything a shy child with a vivid imagination could wish for. She spends her days studying bugs in the backyard, eating fresh mangos straight from the tree and tucked up on her granny’s lap losing herself in books.            Continue reading

WORLD — ‘Cultural genocide’ against children getting belated attention – By Mohamed Hamaludin

By MOHAMED HAMALUDIN

“I feel shame and pain. I ask forgiveness of God,” Pope Francis said on Friday as he apologized for the “deplorable” abuses of Canada’s First Nations children.

Between the 1880s and the 1990s, the government ran a system of compulsory boarding schools which a National Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) recently dubbed ‘cultural genocide’,” The New York Times reported. The Catholic Church operated about 70 percent of those schools, where about 150,000 children were placed and “where abuse, both physical and sexual, was widespread, along with neglect and disease,” The Times said. A former judge, Murray Sinclair, who headed the commission, estimated that at least 6,000 children went missing.          Continue reading

JAMAICA: 100 Jamaican individuals and organizations sign open letter to William and Kate

— regarding their visit to celebrate Queen Elizabeth II 70 year reign

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I am sharing below the Advocates Network’s Open Letter to William and Kate, who bear the titles “The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.” The letter is signed by 100 individuals (including myself) and organizations. The royal couple will arrive in Jamaica on Tuesday, March 22 and depart on Thursday, March 24, as part of their Caribbean tour.

Dear William and Kate: Why not just say you are sorry?      Continue reading
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