Category Archives: Caribbean news

REFUGEES: How Trinidad Expelled 16 Venezuelan Kids to the Sea- Nina Rancel | Caracas Chronicles

29 VENEZUELAN REFUGEES, 16 MINORS among them, were missing for a day after the Trinidadian government put them in wooden boats back to Venezuela. They are safe now but the story hasn’t ended

Nina Rancel | Caracas Chronicles

On Sunday, November, 22nd, 16 Venezuelan minors ranging four months to 14 years old, nine women and four men were sent back to Venezuela from Trinidad and Tobago, a little after 11:00 a.m. A yellow level weather alert had been issued by climate authorities. They were supposed to have a habeas corpus hearing, scheduled for that afternoon at 2:00 p.m.; then rescheduled to an earlier time at 12:30 p.m., upon insistence by the lawyer handling the case, Nafeesa Mohammed. They were forced to leave before the hearing.       Continue reading

MUSIC: REGGAE: Bob Marley’s 30 greatest songs – ranked! – with Videos – The Guardian

Bob Marley

As Tuff Gong releases a limited edition series of Marley albums, we pick the greatest work of reggae’s biggest star

THE GUARDIAN – by 19 November 2020

30. Rude Boy (1965)

The ska-era Wailers launch themselves into the 60s Jamaican vogue for singles either praising or condemning the violent Kingston “rude boy” youth cult. Tellingly, given the socio-political songs that lay ahead of him, Marley focuses on the deprived circumstances that birthed the phenomenon: “Want it want it – can’t get it, get it get it – no want it.”                Continue reading

Poem by Jamaica’s Poet Laureate Lorna Goodison – by the Rosaliene Bacchus Blog

by Rosaliene BacchusThree Worlds One Vision ~ Guyana – Brazil – USA
Jamaica’s Poet Laureate Lorna Goodison (2017-2020)
Photo Credit: Pan American World Magazine (Photo by Hugh Wright)

My Poetry Corner November 2020 features the poem “Mother, the Great Stones Got to Move” from the 1995 poetry collection, To Us, All Flowers Are Roses, by Jamaica’s second Poet Laureate Lorna Goodison (2017-2020) and the first female to receive this honor. The eight of nine children, six boys and three girls, she was born in 1947 in Kingston, capital of the Caribbean island nation of Jamaica.        Continue reading

INTERVIEW: David Lammy: ‘You can be critical of your country and still love it’ – The Guardian UK

Interview  – Sun 15 Nov 202 – The Guardian UK
Illustration: Lyndon Hayes/The Observer – David Lammy has Guyanese roots

The Labour MP talks about belonging, Brexit and Caribbean comfort food

“I make sure I know where all the new Caribbean restaurants and takeaways are,” says David Lammy, “because there are times I need a certain type of comfort food. Somewhere like this is almost umbilical for me. It’s the food my mum used to cook.”

We are in One Love Kitchen, in Finsbury Park, north London, which began life in a city street-food market and opened here just in time for lockdown. While Uber Eats riders come and go clutching bagged orders, and locals queue for something from the invitingly smoky grill, Her Majesty’s shadow minister for justice is deliberating between the jerk chicken and brown stew. Actually, “umbilical” is almost literally right, he suggests with a laugh as he opts for the former, because he was conceived a couple of streets away from here, where his parents had a bedsit.        Continue reading

TRAVEL: Barbados’s 12 month Welcome Stamp Work Visa initiative successful

REMOTE WORKERS FROM METROPOLITAN CITIES — ESCAPING COVID-19

By Adrian Loverage in Barbados

There can be no reasonable doubt that the 12 month Barbados Welcome Stamp initiative has brought the destination an almost unparalleled level of media and public awareness and kudos to all those involved in its conception and ongoing content enhancement.

Amongst, the latest exposure is the planned Lion Television Scotland 60 minute documentary, which in their words, will ‘follow adventurous British families and individuals as they take an almighty plunge and relocate in the middle of a global pandemic, to work remotely from Barbados’.    Continue reading

The View from Europe: Cruise lines facing a much-changed future – By David Jessop

By David Jessop

From Bridgetown’s Carlisle Bay to England’s south-west coastal town of Weymouth, cruise ships berthed offshore and out of service have become a familiar sight.

Their presence brings a daily reminder of the economic challenge that faces the Caribbean in a year that has seen visitor arrival numbers collapse, cruise ship calls all but cease, and revenues from tourism hugely diminished.

Since March 14, almost every cruise vessel that sails out of the US to the region has been under a ‘no sail’ order from the US authorities.  Continue reading

OPINION: Where Are You From? I hear an accent! – By Lear Matthews + 4 videos – REBLOGGED

This entry appeared in Guyanese Online on August  06, 2015 . It has four videos.

Where Are You From? I hear an accent! –  By Lear Matthews

The question, “where are you from? You have an accent” is one that is quite familiar to immigrants.  The stimulus for such a query is usually based on one’s speech pattern, accent or other linguistic attributes that appear to be different or “foreign.”  A good friend told me that his initial inclination is to respond by saying “Earth! Where are you from?” when asked this question.  But he quickly declared that because he was raised to be polite, he exercises self restraint, empathy and diplomacy.

He further stated that his response may be followed by pointing out to the questioner that she/he too has an “accent”.      Continue reading

Remembrance Day: A Guyanese Hero of the First World War – By Francis Quamina Farrier

Gershom Browne in military uniform in this 1914 photograph
Photo: Gershom Browne in military uniform in this 1914 photograph

By Francis Quamina Farrier

HIS name is Gershom Onesimus Browne. In his later years, many looked up to him in awe as he marched in his 90s and became a centenarian. He used to ride his bicycle along the Bagotville public roads when he was well into his 90s. A physical and mental titan he certainly was. The last surviving Guyanese veteran and hero of the First World War, and like others of his generation, Gershom lived through the years of both World Wars.

The thing about elders is that youngsters hardly ever pause to wonder what those elders were and what they achieved when they were youngsters. In this article, we will reflect on what Gershom, who lived to the ripe old age of 102, did and achieved when he was a youngster and also in his mature years.        Continue reading

OPINION: What a Biden-Harris win means for Jamaica and the Caribbean

Joe Biden
Joe Biden

Cassells, in her analysis of the US election, and what the win means for Jamaica and the Caribbean, said at this moment, things on the ground in the United States will take up the bulk of the attention of the new administration.      Continue reading

HANSIB PUBLICATIONS – CATALOGUE • AUTUMN 2020

HANSIB: Celebrating Fifty Years of Publishing 1970 – 2020

At its inception in 1970, Hansib Publications was the dream of Arif Ali, a Guyanese immigrant, who had no formal experience in publishing. He had settled in England and recognised among his fellow travellers and contemporaries a grandiloquence and epic sensibility which the mainstream media either deliberately ignored or simply failed to recognise at the time.

The titles are mainly by Guyanese and West Indian writers.  They include titles under the following headings:          Continue reading