Tag Archives: Trinidad

Caribbean 2020: Voters Tough Choices in Elections in Six Countries

Click to Enlarge

VOTERS TOUGH CHOICES

Six key Caribbean Community nations will hold general elections this year and in at least three of them, the economy and racial tensions will be key campaign issues. Also in the same three — Guyana, Suriname and Trinidad — the incumbents face tough reelection battles from upstart opposition parties or groups. Voting along ethnic lines has traditionally been a key factor in these three and could determine outcomes.

Guyana which just weeks ago became one of the world’s newest crude oil exporters, will most likely go to the polls first among the seven with the March 2 date set by incumbent President David Granger since last year. Parliament has already been dissolved.          Continue reading

Queens Book Fair: Immigrant Stories That Inspire – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

  – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

It is important for immigrants to tell their stories. These stories nourish and provide inspiration to the community. They act as signals that guide and remind us about the old values that are sometimes forgotten in the one-line responses on social media. But more important, the stories become lessons for the young that must navigate their way in an environment that is far removed from that of their parents.

The young constantly hear of what life was like in Guyana, Trinidad, Suriname, Jamaica, and other places. They hear of the struggles of their parents and of their will to succeed. But these stories are not only confined to the Caribbean, and other faraway places. They are to be found in New York as well.

READ MORE: Queens Book Fair- Immigrant Stories That Inspire

I am glad my ancestors made the decision to leave India – By Mike Persaud

By Mike Persaud – Letter in Stabroek News – 06 May 2019

May 5th marked the 181st anniversary of Indian Arrival Day (IAD) in Guyana. There had been some debate about whether to call this event a “celebration”. In Guyana it is called simply, “Indian Arrival Day”. Celebration or Observance – it makes little difference.

Reflecting on these last 181 years in Guyana (as well as in Fiji, Mauritius, South Africa, Suriname, Trinidad, Jamaica and elsewhere), and on the development and progress of Indians – socially, economically, culturally, levels of freedom enjoyed – I would say it was a good decision our ancestors made when they signed up to go to the sugar colonies.

I have visited some of the villages in the Indentured Belt (Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, West Bengal), saw economic and social conditions there, and formed my considered opinion that we, the descendants of those indentured are better off today than had our ancestors never left. (I suspect this statement will stir debate and argument – that would be a good thing to stimulate thought).          Continue reading

The View from Europe: China’s rapidly advancing Caribbean role – by David Jessop

The View from Europe: China’s rapidly advancing Caribbean role

David Jessop

For some years now, China has sought to deepen its relations with the countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. It has done so as a part of a long-term geo-political strategy that is accompanying its rise to super power status.

Its objective in every nation in South and Central America and the Caribbean is to support development through investment and trade, and then over time to enlarge its economic, political and security role.   Continue reading

Caribbean: A Ferry Between the Islands? Two to Set Sail Soon

Ferry Between the Islands? Two Soon to Set Sail

  AUGUST 4, 2016

ferryTHE DREAM JET EXPRESS IS ONE OF TWO FERRIES THAT THE CARIBBEAN FERRY SERVICE SAYS SHOULD BE ON THE SEAS BY YEAR-END. (PHOTO CREDIT: NATIONNEWS.COM)

BRIDGETOWN, Barbados, Thursday August 4, 2016 – A long-awaited passenger ferry service linking some islands of the Caribbean could be setting sail by year-end. But wait, it may not be the only one.

While the Barbados-registered Caribbean Ferry Service is in the process of finalizing paperwork to operate two vessels, another effort is being made to get a double decker ferry with a capacity of 350 to travel within the southern Caribbean.

According to the Nation newspaper in Barbados, Caribbean Ferry Service will operate The Dream Jet Express and The Opal Jet Express, for travel and cargo.   Continue reading

TASSA THUNDER: Folk Music from India to the Caribbean – video

TASSA THUNDER : Folk Music from India to the Caribbean – YouTube

Published on Mar 25, 2014    – Vibert Cambridge shared this link.

This 53-minute video documentary explores Indo-Caribbean music culture through focusing on a set of neo-traditional music genres, relating them to sources and counterparts in North India’s Bhojpuri region and Indian communities in Fiji. Topics covered include chutney, chowtal, birha, nagara drumming, Ahir dance, the dantal, the Alha-Udal epic, and most extensively, tassa drumming. Tassa music is explored in reference to its rhythmic structures, its performance contexts of weddings, competitions, and Muharram (Hosay), and the construction of its drums. The film combines unique performance footage and interviews taken between 1990 and 2010 in India, Trinidad, Guyana, Suriname, New York, and Fijian communities in California. It conveys how Indo-Caribbean music culture comprises a unique and dynamic combination of both resilient marginal survivals as well as innovative forms.

Venezuela’s Changing Relationship With CARICOM – By David Jessop

Venezuela’s Changing Relationship With CARICOM – By David Jessop

Maduro at UN

News Americas, LONDON, England, Tues. Nov. 10, 2015: As with so much in politics it is often what is not seen, said or fully understood that drives events. This is particularly so in the case of Venezuela’s changing relationship with the countries of CARICOM.

In recent months Caracas has been deepening its sub-regional relations and has escalated its border dispute with Guyana. It has also encouraged CARICOM to be less than emphatic in its support for Georgetown’s position.

At the same time, it has been moving rapidly to consolidate its relationship with, in particular, the OECS, Trinidad and Suriname by offering increased levels of support or investments, largely through its concessional PetroCaribe oil and development assistance programs.  Continue reading

NO MUSICAL ENGINE HERE – by Dave Martins.

Dave Martins

Dave Martins

NO MUSICAL ENGINE HERE – by Dave Martins.

Following recent musical explorations in the country, including Dr. Vibert Cambridge’s excellent book, “Musical Life in Guyana”, the current depressed state of our music industry is once again a topic of discussion. We are hearing renewed calls for more music education in the schools, and for ways to make instruments more affordable.

A well-known music teacher stressed the need to identify and foster singular musical talent. Some have called for the creation of a Guyanese “national sound”, and there has been the inevitable shout for government funding for music studios and facilities. It is fair to say that, particularly following Dr. Cambridge’s book, serious concerns have been raised about the state of our music industry today.  Continue reading

Madeiran Portuguese Migration to Guyana, St. Vincent, Antigua and Trinidad – By Jo-Anne S. Ferreira

Madeiran Portuguese Migration to Guyana, St. Vincent, Antigua and Trinidad:

A Comparative Overview

Madeira Island click for info

Madeira Island click for more info – Wikipedia also click map to enlarge

By Jo-Anne S. Ferreira – University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad.

THIS PAPER REPRESENTS a preliminary exploration of Madeiran migration to the Anglophone Caribbean.1 It seeks to consider the phenomenon of Madeiran migration in the context of the wider Anglophone Caribbean by comparing and contrasting the waves of Madeiran migration across the region, including the extent and rate of cultural assimilation in each new home of Madeiran migrants. Apart from the primary sources available for the Portuguese community of Trinidad, mainly secondary sources have been used and assessed for the other territories as an initial basis for comparison. This is done particularly where the experiences of migrants have been reportedly similar.2

During the 140 years of Madeiran Portuguese migration to the Anglophone Caribbean, a period lasting from 1835 to 1975, Portuguese and Luso-West Indians have remained a minority group within the wider host societies.   Continue reading

The Hindus of the Caribbean: An Appreciation – by Murali Balaji

The Hindus of the Caribbean: An Appreciation

Posted: 02/13/2015 2:33 pm EST –  – Director of Education and Curriculum Reform, Hindu American Foundation – HuffingtonPost.com

Nataraja Hinduism symbolOn May 5, 1838, the Whitby, a British ship docked in British Guiana (now known as Guyana) with 249 human cargo after a nearly three-month voyage from the Port of Calcutta in India. Along the way, many of those on board were abused by the ship’s crew, and five died.

The Whitby was the first of many chartered ships that would bring Indians — mostly poor Hindus from rural northern India — to work on the sugar cane plantations in the British West Indies. Over the next 80 years, more than 500,000 Indians would make the trip to the Caribbean as indentured servants, primarily to places such as Guyana and Trinidad. Their story — shaped by the trauma of Transatlantic migration, struggles in a new environment, and eventually the triumph of forging a distinct identity — continues to be an overlooked part of colonial history.  Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: