Tag Archives: Guyana

Guyana Politics: The Familiar Ring of the Elections Season – By Ralph Ramkarran

The Familiar Ring of the Elections Season 

By Ralph Ramkarran – 6th October 2018

Local government elections are to be held on November 12. With it, the never-ending stream of suspicions emerged as the Government established new local government units and merged others. The Opposition argued that these were done to give an advantage to the Government and the Opposition, through one of its representatives, promptly launched legal proceedings. This event provided the explanation for the ‘disappearance’ of the Chief Elections Officer, Mr. Keith Lowenfield, on one of the most critical days of the elections process, namely, the day after the submission of lists, when corrections have to be made and defects rectified.       Continue reading

Guyana-Venezuela: The “controversy” over the arbitration award of 1899 – By Dr. Odeen Ishmael

  • Several Weeks ago, COHA published an analysis of the Venezuela-Guyana boundary dispute by guest scholar Eva Golinger, who is a New York-based attorney and the author of the best-selling book The Chavez Code. In her article, Golinger presents a distinctively pro-Venezuela perspective. In an effort to create a constructive forum between two longtime friends of the organization, COHA is re-publishing the following piece by Dr. Odeen Ishmael. Mr. Ishmael served as Guyana’s ambassador to Washington and now serves as a COHA Senior Research Fellow. His piece presents a strongly pro-Guyana perspective and, as such, will serve to add balance to this issue.

By: Dr. Odeen Ishmael, Senior Research Fellow at the Council on Hemispheric Affairs        Continue reading

Strengthening Justice Delivery In The Caribbean

Strengthening justice delivery in the Caribbean

January 23, 2018 – : Caribbean News Now

PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad — Antiquated systems have long been the bane of legal practitioners in the Caribbean, contributing to severe case backlogs, expensive legal services and debilitating delays.

In 2016, the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) established APEX as a not-for-profit agency to deliver capacity building and technology-based solutions to improve justice delivery for Caribbean courts, law offices and related agencies.   Continue reading

What is really needed to make tourism a success in Guyana? – THAG President weighs in

NOVEMBER is TOURISM MONTH in GUYANA

What is really needed to make tourism a success in Guyana? – THAG President weighs in

THAG Head, Shaun McGrath

What prevents Guyana from achieving the same level of success in the tourism industry as its Caribbean counterparts? Is it really the absence of blue seas and white sand beaches? Is it the high crime rate and poor hospitality services? Or is the problem, way more complex than it appears on the surface?

President of the Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana (THAG) Shaun McGrath recently weighed in on this issue during an informative session at the inaugural business summit of the Georgetown Chamber of Commerce and Industry (GCCI).

According to McGrath, there is national recognition that tourism contributes between six and nine percent to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and brings in a minimum of US $250 million in foreign currency every year.     Continue reading

Annual Diwali festival lights up Richmond Hill, New York – Saturday October 14, 2017

Massive crowds at the Diwali Motorcade New York – Saturday October 14, 2017

The Grand Marshall, Dr. Dhanpaul Narine leads the Parade

The Diwali Motorcade last Saturday night (October 14, 2017) turned out to be a historic event. The crowds were massive under warm skies. The Police catered for about 2,000 persons but close to 10,000 persons showed up that made the Motorcade the biggest in North America. Several more streets had to be closed to accommodate the crowds, with additional security called.

The Grand Marshall, Dr. Dhanpaul Narine, had asked for 1,000 persons to walk with him but about twice this number was present. The cultural program was great and included items from Guyana, Suriname, India and Trinidad, among others.     Continue reading

GUYANA CAUGHT IN THE CHINA TRAP – By Verian Mentis-Barker

GUYANA CAUGHT IN THE CHINA TRAP

Back then it was Red China.    Beijing was Peking.

Its ambitions were cocooning with sights set on the Western Hemisphere.

Now, some serendipity.

British Guiana becomes independent in 1966.

Then Chinese Premier Chou En-lai cabled then Prime Minister Forbes Burnham that he hoped “the people of your country achieve new success in the struggle to safeguard national independence and oppose colonialism and neocolonialism”….and instructed the Chinese press to emblazon its pages with a salute to Guyana and its people, welcoming them to the world of political freedom.   ………………    Six years went by.

1972.

Prime Minister Burnham ascended to President and was struggling to legitimize his Presidency and the Cooperative Socialism ideology he had adopted.  His political swing to the left cost him favor with the West and as punishment, the country lost volume in the export market.

READ MORE: http://xpressblogg.com/guyana-caught-china-trap/

Guyana, Brazil explore completion of Linden/Lethem road and other projects

Guyana, Brazil explore completion of Linden/Lethem road

PHOTO: Brazil Visit: Foreign Minister, Carl Greenidge, meets with Brazil’s Foreign Minister, Aloysio Nunes, on Wednesday, June 28. 2017. At left is Minister David Patterson. (Brazil Foreign Ministry photo).

Continue reading

Fly Jamaica opens Brooklyn New York office

Fly Jamaica opens Brooklyn New York office

Even as it seeks to enhance an already laudable service to its customers, Fly Jamaica Airways has launched a Brooklyn, New York office.

Cutting the ribbon is Fly Jamaica’s Director of Marketing Kayla Reece (second from right) and Ms. Barbara Atherly flanked by Fly Jamaica staffers.

The Brooklyn office located at 1397 Nostrand Avenue, Brooklyn, New York, is the second United States- based Fly Jamaica office dedicated to selling tickets.

The airline has Guyanese couple Captain Paul Reece, the Chairman and CEO, Ms. Roxanne Reece its Managing Director at its helm. Their daughter Kayla Reece is the company’s ever-efficient Marketing Director.     Continue reading

BARBADOS 1966-2016 – Celebrating Fifty Years of Independence – By Dr. Keith A. P. Sandiford

CELEBRATING FIFTY YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE – BARBADOS 1966-2016
By Dr. Keith A. P. Sandiford

barbadosFormer Caribbean colonies are more fortunate than African and Asian ones in that they have completed their first 50 years of political freedom without political and military coups and without the copious shedding of human blood. On November 30, 2016, Barbados will join Guyana, Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago as fifty-year old sovereign states which have thus far avoided the turmoil of revolutions. It is an achievement worthy of joyous celebration. There is a sense that the island has shown perceptible signs of regression, following the worldwide recession of 2008, but the overall all progress since 1966 has been eminently satisfactory.

The emergence of modern Barbados can be said to have begun in the 1950s with the rise of the Barbados Labour Party (BLP) and the Barbados Workers’ Union (BWU). These were the institutions that destroyed the political hegemony of the old plantocracy. They focussed most sharply on the plight of the non-white majority and led the movement which forced the Colonial Government to overhaul its administrative structures and reshape the electoral laws as well as its fiscal practices.   Continue reading

Book: Drink from My Calabash – by Naraine Datt

Book: Drink from My Calabash 

The calabash or bottle gourd (not to be confused with the calabaza) is a vine grown for its fruit, which can either be harvested young and used as a vegetable or harvested mature, dried, and used as a bottle, utensil, or pipe. For this reason, one of the calabash subspecies is known as the bottle gourd. The fresh fruit has a light green smooth skin and a white flesh. However the rounder varieties are called Calabash gourds whereas the longer and slimmer kinds are usually well known as bottle gourds. The calabash was one of the first cultivated plants in the world, grown not for food but as a container. It was named for the calabash tree (Crescentia cujete).     Continue reading

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