Tag Archives: Guyana

Briefing With Senior State Department Official On Mike Pompeo’s visit to Guyana and Region

Caribbean 2020: Voters Tough Choices in Elections in Six Countries

Click to Enlarge

VOTERS TOUGH CHOICES

Six key Caribbean Community nations will hold general elections this year and in at least three of them, the economy and racial tensions will be key campaign issues. Also in the same three — Guyana, Suriname and Trinidad — the incumbents face tough reelection battles from upstart opposition parties or groups. Voting along ethnic lines has traditionally been a key factor in these three and could determine outcomes.

Guyana which just weeks ago became one of the world’s newest crude oil exporters, will most likely go to the polls first among the seven with the March 2 date set by incumbent President David Granger since last year. Parliament has already been dissolved.          Continue reading

EGovernment, A Step Towards A More Citizen-Centred Caribbean | By David Jessop

By David Jessop :Sunday | January 19, 2020 | Jamaica Gleaner

SLOW, BUREAUCRATIC AND UNPREDICTABLE SERVICE

Politicians love to promise a better and brighter future. They tend to say little about the day to day experience their citizens have of the services they provide.

In the Caribbean as in other parts of the world what most individuals want from government is the rapid and efficient delivery of everyday resources, if policies and regulations are to mean anything at all.

This applies equally to social services, whether in relation to schools, hospitals or pensions, the supply of utilities, or to matters as normal as renewing a driver’s licence or registering a birth or death. Citizens everywhere want such basic transactions to be straightforward, quick and predictable. They hope their fellow citizens who work for them in the public sector have the ability and tools to deliver what has been promised in modern and efficient way.            Continue reading

OIL: Flood of Oil Is Coming, Complicating Efforts to Fight Global Warming – New York Times

Nov. 3, 2019 – By Clifford Krause – New Your Times

HOUSTON — A surge of oil production is coming, whether the world needs it or not.
The flood of crude will arrive even as concerns about climate change are growing and worldwide oil demand is slowing. And it is not coming from the usual producers, but from Brazil, Canada, Norway and Guyana — countries that are either not known for oil or whose production has been lackluster in recent years.

This looming new supply may be a key reason Saudi Arabia’s giant oil producer, Aramco, pushed ahead last Sunday with plans for what could be the world’s largest initial stock offering ever.

READ MORE:  Flood of Oil Is Coming, Complicating Efforts to Fight Global Warming

Guyana’s Economy: We must demand what’s justly ours – By Lincoln Lewis

We must stand our ground and demand what’s justly ours

CARICOM: CSME Member States Sign on to Contingent Rights Protocol

Caricom Headquarters
Georgetown. Guyana.

BASSETERRE, St Kitts, Monday March 4, 2019 – Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Member States that are participating in the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME) have all signed on to the Protocol on Contingent Rights and most of them are prepared to immediately begin provisional application of the Protocol.

The Protocol covers the rights of persons moving to another country under the free movement of skills regime, as well as the spouses and dependents of those who move to another country.    Continue reading

Christmas gifts from the politicians – Commentary – Stabroek News

Editorial – Stabroek News – 25 December 2018

There is little peace and good will in the political arena this season. And that applies not just to Guyana, but also to some of the leading democracies such as the UK, France and, of course, the US, to name a few. There is President Donald Trump whose administration stumbled into farce a long time ago, and which has since been disintegrating into chaos. As has become customary in more recent times, lawmakers agreed a short-term spending compromise to carry the government over into the new year.

However, Mr Trump has refused to sign the bill unless the Senate attaches funding to it for a border wall fence. So far he has adhered to that position, effectively partly shutting down the government, and sending thousands of its workers home without their end-of-year salaries. Apparently he does not remember that the Republicans paid a heavy price for refusing to sign a compromise when President Clinton was in office.              Continue reading

Guyana Politics: The Familiar Ring of the Elections Season – By Ralph Ramkarran

The Familiar Ring of the Elections Season 

By Ralph Ramkarran – 6th October 2018

Local government elections are to be held on November 12. With it, the never-ending stream of suspicions emerged as the Government established new local government units and merged others. The Opposition argued that these were done to give an advantage to the Government and the Opposition, through one of its representatives, promptly launched legal proceedings. This event provided the explanation for the ‘disappearance’ of the Chief Elections Officer, Mr. Keith Lowenfield, on one of the most critical days of the elections process, namely, the day after the submission of lists, when corrections have to be made and defects rectified.       Continue reading

Guyana-Venezuela: The “controversy” over the arbitration award of 1899 – By Dr. Odeen Ishmael

  • Several Weeks ago, COHA published an analysis of the Venezuela-Guyana boundary dispute by guest scholar Eva Golinger, who is a New York-based attorney and the author of the best-selling book The Chavez Code. In her article, Golinger presents a distinctively pro-Venezuela perspective. In an effort to create a constructive forum between two longtime friends of the organization, COHA is re-publishing the following piece by Dr. Odeen Ishmael. Mr. Ishmael served as Guyana’s ambassador to Washington and now serves as a COHA Senior Research Fellow. His piece presents a strongly pro-Guyana perspective and, as such, will serve to add balance to this issue.

By: Dr. Odeen Ishmael, Senior Research Fellow at the Council on Hemispheric Affairs        Continue reading

Strengthening Justice Delivery In The Caribbean

Strengthening justice delivery in the Caribbean

January 23, 2018 – : Caribbean News Now

PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad — Antiquated systems have long been the bane of legal practitioners in the Caribbean, contributing to severe case backlogs, expensive legal services and debilitating delays.

In 2016, the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) established APEX as a not-for-profit agency to deliver capacity building and technology-based solutions to improve justice delivery for Caribbean courts, law offices and related agencies.   Continue reading