Tag Archives: Anglophone Caribbean

Is Caribbean integration no longer practical? – By David jessop

The View from Europe – Is Caribbean integration no longer practical? 

David Jessop

David Jessop

Published on May 30, 2015 – By David Jessop

Earlier this year, Owen Arthur, the former prime minister of Barbados, described the malaise that now affects much of the Anglophone Caribbean.

Delivering the 15th Archibald Nedd Memorial Lecture in Grenada, Mr. Arthur observed that the typical Caribbean nation now has to rely for material progress on economic systems that are no longer viable.

“Conditioned for centuries to depending upon preferential access to foreign markets for their exports, on high levels of domestic protection for their industries, and on generous access to concessional financing to support their development, almost every Caribbean nation, has now to face the prospect of building economic systems without the benefit of such props,” he said.  Continue reading

The World Bank and A Changing World – By David Jessop

The World Bank and A Changing World

 By David Jessop

 the-world-bankNews Americas, LONDON, England, Tues. April 14, 12015: It is probably true to say that the average person has little idea what international financial institutions like the World Bank or International Monetary Fund (IMF) do, beyond knowing that they are in some way responsible for having governments impose tough austerity measures and conditions in return for their support.

Notwithstanding, a related issue with wide implications is emerging that warrants close attention in the Caribbean: this is the establishment of what many regard as a future rival to the World Bank in the form of the Chinese-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) with a likely different philosophy. Continue reading

Madeiran Portuguese Migration to Guyana, St. Vincent, Antigua and Trinidad – By Jo-Anne S. Ferreira

Madeiran Portuguese Migration to Guyana, St. Vincent, Antigua and Trinidad:

A Comparative Overview

Madeira Island click for info

Madeira Island click for more info – Wikipedia also click map to enlarge

By Jo-Anne S. Ferreira – University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad.

THIS PAPER REPRESENTS a preliminary exploration of Madeiran migration to the Anglophone Caribbean.1 It seeks to consider the phenomenon of Madeiran migration in the context of the wider Anglophone Caribbean by comparing and contrasting the waves of Madeiran migration across the region, including the extent and rate of cultural assimilation in each new home of Madeiran migrants. Apart from the primary sources available for the Portuguese community of Trinidad, mainly secondary sources have been used and assessed for the other territories as an initial basis for comparison. This is done particularly where the experiences of migrants have been reportedly similar.2

During the 140 years of Madeiran Portuguese migration to the Anglophone Caribbean, a period lasting from 1835 to 1975, Portuguese and Luso-West Indians have remained a minority group within the wider host societies.   Continue reading

UK-Caribbean: Resetting a much Changed Relationship – David Jessop

Britain-Caribbean: Resetting a much Changed Relationship

David Jessop

David Jessop

By David Jessop – News Americas Now, London, England, Monday, June 23, 2014.

Every two years the British and the Caribbean governments meet with the objective of moving forward a relationship that has become much changed.

This time it is the UK’s turn to host the event at Lancaster House in London on June 16 and 17. This is the grand UK government facility where in the 1960s and 1970s the Caribbean negotiated the constitutions that brought independence to almost every Anglophone Caribbean nation.

Attending what will be the Eighth UK-Caribbean Forum, will be almost all Caribbean Foreign Ministers, Britain’s Foreign Secretary, plus other ministers and assorted officials.

In contrast to previous meetings – the last one was in Grenada – this will have a significantly lower profile, with no sessions open to a wider audience, no set piece opening or closing session, and no participation by the UK’s European or North American partners.  Continue reading