Tag Archives: Brazil

OIL: Flood of Oil Is Coming, Complicating Efforts to Fight Global Warming – New York Times

Nov. 3, 2019 – By Clifford Krause – New Your Times

HOUSTON — A surge of oil production is coming, whether the world needs it or not.
The flood of crude will arrive even as concerns about climate change are growing and worldwide oil demand is slowing. And it is not coming from the usual producers, but from Brazil, Canada, Norway and Guyana — countries that are either not known for oil or whose production has been lackluster in recent years.

This looming new supply may be a key reason Saudi Arabia’s giant oil producer, Aramco, pushed ahead last Sunday with plans for what could be the world’s largest initial stock offering ever.

READ MORE:  Flood of Oil Is Coming, Complicating Efforts to Fight Global Warming

Rousseff’s Ouster Weakens BRICS by M.K. Bhadrakumar – Indian Punchline

Rousseff’s Ouster Weakens BRICS  by M.K. Bhadrakumar – Indian Punchline

Official Photo of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff

Brazil’s Dilma Rousseff

The fact of the matter is that the removal of Brazil’s Dilma Rousseff from the office of president and her impending impeachment trial does not add up. Crime and punishment must have some co-relation.

Rousseff herself likened her ouster to a coup d’état. Indeed, the political circumstances are extraordinary. The charge against Rousseff is fiscal wrongdoing – using state money under one budgetary head to cover extra expenditure under another head. She says she diverted the funds for undertaking social programs.

Fiscal jugglery is not unusual for elected governments and it is a common practice in Brazil. No president ever paid this high a price. Curiously, Rousseff is not charged with corruption.  Continue reading

The World Bank and A Changing World – By David Jessop

The World Bank and A Changing World

 By David Jessop

 the-world-bankNews Americas, LONDON, England, Tues. April 14, 12015: It is probably true to say that the average person has little idea what international financial institutions like the World Bank or International Monetary Fund (IMF) do, beyond knowing that they are in some way responsible for having governments impose tough austerity measures and conditions in return for their support.

Notwithstanding, a related issue with wide implications is emerging that warrants close attention in the Caribbean: this is the establishment of what many regard as a future rival to the World Bank in the form of the Chinese-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) with a likely different philosophy. Continue reading

Frustration at Filing for Divorce in Brazil – By Rosaliene Bacchus

Three Worlds One Vision

Divorce - When a Marriage FailsDivorce – When a Marriage Fails
Photo Credit: culturamix.com

Marriages are tested under fire. Some marriages survive the flame, forging a stronger bond. Others suffer third degree burns, weakening the union. My marriage belonged to the latter group. When it ended in Brazil, I had not only failed as a wife but also had to confront the demon of divorce.

“I can’t sponsor you and your sons to come to America unless you’re divorced,” my mother told me.

I opened my Jerusalem Bible for guidance. In the Gospel of Matthew (Chapter 19), Jesus was clear about divorce.

“[W]hat God has united, man must not divide… Now I say this to you: the man who divorces his wife…and marries another, is guilty of adultery.”

Alone and broken with two kids in a foreign country, I spent a year of soul searching to come to terms with what I needed to do…

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Rise of common folk in Brazil, India, Indonesia – commentary

Rise of common folk in Brazil, India, Indonesia

New and popular politicians in the developing world’s largest democracies come from humble origins. This trend reflects an ‘equality of conditions,’ or free societies that come to see dignity in each individual.

Narendra Modi, the newly installed prime minister of the world’s largest democracy, India, is the low-caste son of a tea-stall owner.

Joko Widodo, the president-elect of the third largest democracy, Indonesia, was a furniture maker only a decade ago.

And Marina Silva, the most popular candidate in a presidential race in the fourth largest democracy, Brazil, grew up in poverty in an Amazon jungle town. As a child, she tapped rubber trees and taught herself to read at age 16.

Picture: Presidential candidate Marina Silva of the Brazilian Socialist Party speaks during a Sept. 8 campaign visit to the Unibes Foundation which offers aid to the needy.

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Ports, the Panama Canal and the Future

Ports, Panama and the Future

Panama Canal

In 2015, ships will be transiting an enlarged Panama Canal.

By David Jessop

News Americas, LONDON, England, Mon. Feb. 24, 2014:

In the last few years, almost every significant Caribbean country has announced that they are upgrading their port facilities and preparing to compete to attract the larger Post-Panamax vessels that from some time in 2015 will be transiting an enlarged Panama Canal.

Such is the opportunity, given the Caribbean’s strategic location at the cross roads of north-south and east-west trade, and its numerous existing or new locations for deepwater ports, that Jamaica, Martinique, Cuba, Trinidad, the Bahamas and the Dominican Republic have all made clear that with the support of one or another foreign investor, port development will become critical to future growth. However, what is still far from certain is whether there is enough opportunity for all of the existing or proposed super ports, hubs, and manufacturing and trans-shipment zones to succeed.   Continue reading

Diplomatic Minutes in Making of South American History – by Odeen Ishmael

Diplomatic Minutes in Making of South American History – by Odeen Ishmael

Ishmael book“The Trail of Diplomacy” is Odeen Ishmael’s illuminating, educational and exciting reading – vital to understanding international diplomacy as a mover of history”.

Author Odeen Ishmael’s contribution to international diplomacy and South American history comes in the form of a book on the Guyana-Venezuela border issue that started in 1840. Guyana today is much less powerful than its neighbor Venezuela, but not at the time of the boundary dispute. Guyana was then British Guiana, a colonial territory of Great Britain.   Continue reading

A Human Spring by Uri Avnery

VIEW FROM ISRAEL – by Uri Avnery – July 5, 2013

A Human Spring

The democratic revolutionaries have yet to prove that they are able to lead a country – in Egypt or anywhere else.

LET ME come back to the story about Zhou Enlai, the Chinese communist leader. When asked what he thought about the French Revolution, he famously answered: “It’s too early to say.”

This was considered a typical piece of ancient Chinese wisdom – until somebody pointed out that Zhou did not mean the revolution of 1789, but the events of May 1968, which happened not long before the interview in question.

Even now it may be too early to judge that upheaval, when students tore up the cobblestones of Paris, confronted the brutal police and proclaimed a new era. It was an early forerunner of what is happening today all over the world.

QUESTIONS ABOUND. Why? Why now? Why in so many totally different countries? Why in Brazil, Turkey and Egypt at the same time?      Continue reading

Criminal deportees sent back to the Caribbean in 2012 – US report

Criminal deportees sent back to the Caribbean in 2012 – US report

News Americas, NEW YORK, NY, Thursday Jan.3, 2013: A total of 55,742 criminal immigrants were sent packing from the U.S. and back to their homelands in the Caribbean and Latin America in 2012, New Americas has found.

Data NAN obtained and analyzed from the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency on deportee rates to Latin America and the Caribbean, found that while some 4,898 of all criminal immigrants were sent back to the Caribbean last year, Latin America accounted for over 12 time that number with 50,844.
A “criminal alien” is defined under U.S. immigration laws as a migrant who is convicted of a crime. Most of those deported were sent back for murders and sex and drug crimes.      Continue reading

Brazil’s secret fiscal weapon: the tax ‘lion’

Brazil’s secret fiscal weapon: the tax ‘lion’

Stabroek staff On May 9, 2012  – BRASILIA,  (Reuters) –

In Brazil, groups of armed agents fly around the country by helicopter, pounding on doors and instilling fear in the hearts of those who break the law.
They’re not the police – they’re from the tax agency.

The Federal Revenue Service, which has gained global renown for its tough and creative tactics, will be one of the most important keys to Brazil’s economic prospects in 2012. President Dilma Rousseff is counting on the agency’s tax-collecting prowess to help her government meet ambitious budget targets without smothering the country’s suddenly brittle economy.

The agency, known as “The Lion” for its official emblem as well as its ferocious pursuit of tax dodgers, deploys everything from gun-toting operatives to meters on beer kegs in breweries to ensure that individuals and companies fully declare, and pay, their share to the government.
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