Tag Archives: Brazil

Commentary: Looking at the COVID-19 Down Under – by Francis Quamina Farrier

by Francis Quamina Farrier

During the past four months I have written feature articles about the COVID19 pandemic focusing on a number of countries. They include Argentina, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, India, Pakistan, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, the United Kingdom, Zambia and Zimbabwe. During the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic globally, I consider it important for Guyanese to know a bit about how other countries around the world are dealing with the pandemic.

That is so especially with our neighbour Brazil, which has an extremely high number of cases – 5 million infected and 147,000 dead. That is second only to the United States with 7.6 million infected, including the president, and 214,000 deaths. Closer home, reports are that there are some infected persons in Brazil who are crossing the Takatu border river from Bon Fim into Lethem and spreading the virus in Region 9.          Continue reading

Briefing With Senior State Department Official On Mike Pompeo’s visit to Guyana and Region

Guyana-US Relations: Trotman cautions government against “unholy agenda”

— Pompeo to also visit Suriname, Brazil, Colombia

Opposition Member of Parliament (MP) and leader of the Alliance For Change (AFC), Raphael Trotman, yesterday cautioned the new administration against agreeing to anything that may threaten Guyana’s sovereignty ahead of the United States Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo’s scheduled visit later this week.

Opposition MP, Raphael Trotman

“Being aware of the imminent arrival of certain foreign dignitaries,” Trotman cautioned, “we must be careful that in the height of the pomp, no pun intended, and ceremony, we do not lose our dignity and self-respect and trade our sovereignty, statehood and hallowed stance of the right to self-determination and non-interference, in the affairs of other states by agreeing to some unhelpful and unholy agenda that is meant to boost electoral prospects elsewhere.”  Continue reading

Indigenous Peoples of the A-B-C countries of South America –By Francis Quamina Farrier

—By Francis Quamina Farrier – on Indigenous Heritage month

September is observed as Indigenous Heritage month by many Indigenous peoples of the Americas, including the USA.

Stephen Campbell

This is also here in Guyana, where September 10 is celebrated as the Day for National Indigenous Hero, Hon. Stephen Campbell. He was the very first Indigenous Guyanese to serve in the country’s legislature (Parliament). Stephen Campbell worked tirelessly for the upliftment of his people, especially for land rights. He died on May 12, 1966, just two weeks before Guyana’s independence on May 26, 1966. Campbell Town which is adjacent to Lethem in Region 9, is named to his honour and memory. (see video on Stephen Campbell at end of article)

For the purpose of this article, I decided to look at the fortunes, or lack thereof, of the Indigenous peoples of the “A-B-C” countries of South America; Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Columbia and Chile.        Continue reading

OIL: Flood of Oil Is Coming, Complicating Efforts to Fight Global Warming – New York Times

Nov. 3, 2019 – By Clifford Krause – New Your Times

HOUSTON — A surge of oil production is coming, whether the world needs it or not.
The flood of crude will arrive even as concerns about climate change are growing and worldwide oil demand is slowing. And it is not coming from the usual producers, but from Brazil, Canada, Norway and Guyana — countries that are either not known for oil or whose production has been lackluster in recent years.

This looming new supply may be a key reason Saudi Arabia’s giant oil producer, Aramco, pushed ahead last Sunday with plans for what could be the world’s largest initial stock offering ever.

READ MORE:  Flood of Oil Is Coming, Complicating Efforts to Fight Global Warming

Rousseff’s Ouster Weakens BRICS by M.K. Bhadrakumar – Indian Punchline

Rousseff’s Ouster Weakens BRICS  by M.K. Bhadrakumar – Indian Punchline

Official Photo of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff

Brazil’s Dilma Rousseff

The fact of the matter is that the removal of Brazil’s Dilma Rousseff from the office of president and her impending impeachment trial does not add up. Crime and punishment must have some co-relation.

Rousseff herself likened her ouster to a coup d’état. Indeed, the political circumstances are extraordinary. The charge against Rousseff is fiscal wrongdoing – using state money under one budgetary head to cover extra expenditure under another head. She says she diverted the funds for undertaking social programs.

Fiscal jugglery is not unusual for elected governments and it is a common practice in Brazil. No president ever paid this high a price. Curiously, Rousseff is not charged with corruption.  Continue reading

The World Bank and A Changing World – By David Jessop

The World Bank and A Changing World

 By David Jessop

 the-world-bankNews Americas, LONDON, England, Tues. April 14, 12015: It is probably true to say that the average person has little idea what international financial institutions like the World Bank or International Monetary Fund (IMF) do, beyond knowing that they are in some way responsible for having governments impose tough austerity measures and conditions in return for their support.

Notwithstanding, a related issue with wide implications is emerging that warrants close attention in the Caribbean: this is the establishment of what many regard as a future rival to the World Bank in the form of the Chinese-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) with a likely different philosophy. Continue reading

Frustration at Filing for Divorce in Brazil – By Rosaliene Bacchus

Three Worlds One Vision

Divorce - When a Marriage FailsDivorce – When a Marriage Fails
Photo Credit: culturamix.com

Marriages are tested under fire. Some marriages survive the flame, forging a stronger bond. Others suffer third degree burns, weakening the union. My marriage belonged to the latter group. When it ended in Brazil, I had not only failed as a wife but also had to confront the demon of divorce.

“I can’t sponsor you and your sons to come to America unless you’re divorced,” my mother told me.

I opened my Jerusalem Bible for guidance. In the Gospel of Matthew (Chapter 19), Jesus was clear about divorce.

“[W]hat God has united, man must not divide… Now I say this to you: the man who divorces his wife…and marries another, is guilty of adultery.”

Alone and broken with two kids in a foreign country, I spent a year of soul searching to come to terms with what I needed to do…

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Rise of common folk in Brazil, India, Indonesia – commentary

Rise of common folk in Brazil, India, Indonesia

New and popular politicians in the developing world’s largest democracies come from humble origins. This trend reflects an ‘equality of conditions,’ or free societies that come to see dignity in each individual.

Narendra Modi, the newly installed prime minister of the world’s largest democracy, India, is the low-caste son of a tea-stall owner.

Joko Widodo, the president-elect of the third largest democracy, Indonesia, was a furniture maker only a decade ago.

And Marina Silva, the most popular candidate in a presidential race in the fourth largest democracy, Brazil, grew up in poverty in an Amazon jungle town. As a child, she tapped rubber trees and taught herself to read at age 16.

Picture: Presidential candidate Marina Silva of the Brazilian Socialist Party speaks during a Sept. 8 campaign visit to the Unibes Foundation which offers aid to the needy.

Continue reading

Ports, the Panama Canal and the Future

Ports, Panama and the Future

Panama Canal

In 2015, ships will be transiting an enlarged Panama Canal.

By David Jessop

News Americas, LONDON, England, Mon. Feb. 24, 2014:

In the last few years, almost every significant Caribbean country has announced that they are upgrading their port facilities and preparing to compete to attract the larger Post-Panamax vessels that from some time in 2015 will be transiting an enlarged Panama Canal.

Such is the opportunity, given the Caribbean’s strategic location at the cross roads of north-south and east-west trade, and its numerous existing or new locations for deepwater ports, that Jamaica, Martinique, Cuba, Trinidad, the Bahamas and the Dominican Republic have all made clear that with the support of one or another foreign investor, port development will become critical to future growth. However, what is still far from certain is whether there is enough opportunity for all of the existing or proposed super ports, hubs, and manufacturing and trans-shipment zones to succeed.   Continue reading