Tag Archives: The Bahamas

EGovernment, A Step Towards A More Citizen-Centred Caribbean | By David Jessop

By David Jessop :Sunday | January 19, 2020 | Jamaica Gleaner

SLOW, BUREAUCRATIC AND UNPREDICTABLE SERVICE

Politicians love to promise a better and brighter future. They tend to say little about the day to day experience their citizens have of the services they provide.

In the Caribbean as in other parts of the world what most individuals want from government is the rapid and efficient delivery of everyday resources, if policies and regulations are to mean anything at all.

This applies equally to social services, whether in relation to schools, hospitals or pensions, the supply of utilities, or to matters as normal as renewing a driver’s licence or registering a birth or death. Citizens everywhere want such basic transactions to be straightforward, quick and predictable. They hope their fellow citizens who work for them in the public sector have the ability and tools to deliver what has been promised in modern and efficient way.            Continue reading

News Americas Now Headlines – February 1, 2017

NEWS AMERICAS NOW – February 1, 2017   news-americas

GUYANA: Latest News – 02 July 2015 – Demerara Waves

    GUYANA: Latest News – 02 July 2015 –  Demerara Waves

  • Investors promised predictable rules as Guyana welcomes opening of Giftland Mall – Demerara Waves http://bit.ly/1Cf4f19
  • High Court action seeks to block two ministers from sitting in National Assembly – Demerara Waves http://bit.ly/1NApHOt
  • Guyana’s growth slumped to 3.9 percent in 2014; PPP, PSC differ on economic recession – Demerara Waves http://bit.ly/1HzJXj3
  • Irfaan Ali distances self as “free fuel” culprit, urges government to name abusers – Demerara Waves http://bit.ly/1C3MCRx
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The View from Europe: The future is services – By David Jessop – Commentary

Commentary: The View from Europe: The future is services
Published on April 25, 2015 – By David Jessop
When in the early 1990s it became apparent that Europe’s preferential regimes for Caribbean bananas and sugar were coming to an end, an impassioned debate began about a transition to other forms of economic activity. For the most part, the language then was about alternative crops, import substitution, manufacturing, exports and financial services, with little said about tourism, as its sustainability was widely regarded as uncertain.

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  David Jessop

Since then the world has moved on. Tourism has come to dominate most Caribbean economies; offshore financial services, after being encouraged, have come under threat from the same developed countries that had originally recommended them; and agriculture has only begun to genuinely reorient itself where it is low cost, has clear niche opportunities, or there is a recognised need to ensure food security.

Although this diminished role for traditional agriculture is still hard for some in the region to accept, it is clear that the greater part of the economic future for smaller economies is now in services (alongside taking much greater advantage of the Caribbean’s economically strategic location to transship, assemble or manufacture). So much so that in the small island economies it is likely to be the services sector that becomes the significant economic driver in the future.
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Only people power can save us! – By David Comissiong – (Barbados)

Only people power can save us!

February 16, 2015 • Stabroek News

David Comissiong

David Comissiong

By David Comissiong – (Barbados)

Virtually the entire Caribbean Community (CARICOM) region is in crisis, and at the heart of the crisis are dysfunctional and corrupt Governments. It has now become plain for all to see that the so-called “Westminster two party political system” that was conferred upon our Caribbean nations as they moved into Independence has turned out to be fundamentally flawed.

The fundamental flaw consists of the fact that the system permits the powerful institution of Government to be held hostage and used as an instrument of personal financial profiteering by venal politicians, without adequate provision being made for interventions by the citizenry to hold politicians accountable or to punish them with dismissal when their behaviour so merits. Indeed, the only intervention that the Westminster system permits is a once every five-year intervention at General Election time, and this is clearly not good enough.  Continue reading

Leaders in self-denial as Caribbean economic crisis worsens

Leaders in self-denial as Caribbean economic crisis worsens

by Sir Ronald Sanders –   published Caribbean360.com

imageSt Lucia’s Prime Minister Dr Kenny Anthony charged that governments are “engaged in one form or another of self-denial” while the Caribbean is “in the throes of a major crisis like it has never ever experienced before”.

Thursday November 7, 2013 – St Lucia’s Prime Minister Dr Kenny Anthony says that there is a grave economic crisis gnawing away at Caribbean countries and “governments are busy looking inward – each busy with their own agenda rather than pursuing a Caribbean solution to the economic crisis”. Not for the first time Dr Anthony has dared to tred where many other Caribbean leaders have shied away.    Continue reading

The Panama Canal And The Caribbean – by David Jessop

The Panama Canal And The Caribbean – By David Jessop

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The widened Panama Canal – in 2014 – will affect the Caribbean

News Americas, LONDON, England, Weds. April 4, 2012:   In two years time, significantly larger ships will be able to pass via an enlarged Panama Canal between the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. Together with other infrastructural developments this is leading some Caribbean governments to hope that with the support of investors from outside the region, Panama’s development as a hub for the hemisphere could significantly improve the region’s economic prospects.

Although this idea needs to be treated with a degree of caution, not least because many Caribbean nations remain heavily indebted and remain at risk from any significant increase in energy and food prices, the Canal’s widening does suggest new opportunity for the region when taken together with other developments and the broadening interest being shown by large international investors.      Continue reading

Guyana ranks low again on Tranparency’s corruption index

Guyana ranks low again on Tranparency’s corruption index

Posted By Stabroek News – December 5, 2012  | Comments

Guyana ranked a very poor 28 out of 100 points in the Transparency International 2012 Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI).

The report released this morning showed Guyana doing worse than every other country in  Caricom except for Haiti which has also traditionally been one of the worst performers.

Transparency premiered a new methodology today where countries are ranked from 1 to 100 with 100 representing the least corrupt. Any score below 50 indicates a serious problem and though it is not possible to meaningfully compare Guyana’s performance with the previous methodology, the country remains in the bracket of those with a very serious problem.

By contrast, Barbados ranks at 76, The Bahamas 71, Trinidad and Tobago 39 and Jamaica 38.            Continue reading

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