Tag Archives: Peter D’Aguiar

Guyana Politics: Political leadership and national stability – Commentary By Eusi Kwayana

… All are involved, all are consumed – By Eusi Kwayana – IN THE DIASPORA 

eusi Kwayana

– March 25, 2019 – Stabroek News

Is there any doubt that political leadership in Guyana as in other countries like Venezuela, Britain, India, Pakistan, Congo and Nigeria needs to be born again? I am closer to the situation in Guyana. A no confidence motion is nothing vicious – the traditional no confidence motion of December purported to end the Coalition, elected with its one seat majority in 2015. The Court of Appeal decision is now subject to a final judicial hearing before the Caribbean Court of Justice by the parties concerned.

In 2011, the one seat majority of the PPP/C dodged this procedure by not following an important parliamentary convention. Using statecraft, it avoided debate and instead prorogued the parliament without explanation for an uncomfortably long period. That government was defeated in 2015 by a coalition with another one-seat majority.          Continue reading

This Elderly Gentleman Welcomes AGE EIGHTY – by Francis Quamina Farrier

This Elderly Gentleman Welcomes AGE EIGHTY – by Francis Quamina Farrier

Francis Quamina Farrier

Please permit me to inform you that on March 12, 2018, I celebrated my Eightieth Birthday. I am hard pressed to realize it, since it seems to me as though it was only last year that I celebrated my 18th birthday. Now here I am at eighty years of age!

Goodness, Gracious, me! So it gives me great pleasure to relate to you, just a few of the things which happened in British Guiana/Guyana and the rest of the World, during the early and later portions of the past eight decades, and which I enjoy talking about from time to time.      Continue reading

Kaldor Budget and Black Friday February 16, 1962 – commentary

From the Diaspora…Kaldor Budget and Black Friday February 16, 1962

MARCH 30, 2014 | BY  | Commentary … By Ralph Seeram 

Ralph SeeramMr. Forbes Burnham dealt with the harsh tax measures introduced by what was known as the Kaldor Budget and ended his speech by working on the emotions of his audience in the manner of Mark Anthony. “Comrades,” he exclaimed, “the fight starts now. Tomorrow at 2 o’clock in the afternoon there is a demonstration organized by the Trade Union Congress, a demonstration against the harsh proposals of the budget, which make life unbearable.

“No doubt the Riot Squad will be there. Do you still want to go? Comrades, remember that tomorrow Jagan’s army is coming down from Cane Grove and Windsor Forest. Do you still want to go? (Wynn Parry Commission).”

Thus started a series of events on February 12, 1962 that led to the burning and looting of several businesses in Georgetown on what is now described as Black Friday February 16, 1962.

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Recording Guyanese political history – Nigel Westmaas

Recording Guyanese political history: Memory, `archives’ and narrative overlook

By Nigel Westmaas

This essay is concerned about the politics of memory.  As Guyana’s newest political (elections) season unfurls there will be  numerous references to events, concepts and phrases that support attendant political narratives, that is, Guyanese political history as mainly defined by the two mass political parties that have been at the helm of the country’s political life since 1953. This contemporary concentration on a convenient nomenclature of Guyana’s political history that devolves primarily on the narrative of the two dominant political forces is hardly surprising given the grasp these organisations have held on national political consciousness up to this point.

The nomenclature of  events and concepts by which the two main political parties (the PPP and PNC) define  and control the narrative of “modern” Guyanese politics include:  the “1950s” and “1960s”; “Disturbances”; Feed, Clothe and House the nation”; Enmore Martyrs”, “First Past the Post “ system; ”Sun Chapman” and the preceding Wismar incidents; “ Power-sharing”; “rigged elections”;  “Partition”; “Proportional representation”; and “paramountcy of the party”.  These favourites in the local political lexicon, as important as they are separately and collectively, sometimes uncritically legalize the philosophy and actions of one main party or the other in the representation of Guyana’s political history. This dominance leaves in its wake silences or ill attendance to other political narratives, past and present and the need for a thoughtful search for an improvement in our political narrative and culture.    [more]

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