Tag Archives: Janet Jagan

Guyana Politics: Portuguese Arrival Day: What would have happened…?

Yesterday, the government celebrated Portuguese Arrival Day. The observance is a plus for the government and shows that it is far more responsive than the PPP to the sensitivities of minority ethnic groups.

The PPPC prior to 2001 saw things through the prism of class. It was a socialist party which saw the class struggle as being primary and the elements of the superstructure as being secondary. The matriarch of the PPP, Janet Jagan, believed, quite naively, that once the economic situation of the working class was improved, the racial divisions within this class would disappear.

Dr. Walter Rodney did not discount the importance of race, but he misread it. He failed to appreciate how ethnic insecurity could undermine class unity. And he paid for that with his life, when the State apparatus turned against him and working class could not prevent his assassination.        Continue reading

Guyana Politics: British perceptions of Guyanese politicians in 1953: Cheddi Jagan– By Winston McGowan

By Winston McGowan – Stabroek News  – October 4, 2002

(Left to Right): Jainarine Singh, Sidney King (Eusi Kwayana), ​Forbes Burnham. Janet Jagan, Cheddi Jagan, Joseph Latchmansingh and Ashton Chase – 1953

British perceptions of Guyanese politicians in 1953: Cheddi Jagan

1953 was one of the most momentous years in the history of British Guiana- now Guyana. It witnessed two striking but contrasting events. Firstly, in April the country had a general election under a new constitution distinguished by universal adult suffrage and the grant of a measure of ministerial responsibility to the winning political history. The election resulted in a convincing victory for the People’s Progressive Party, led by Cheddi Jagan with Forbes Burnham as his chairman. The PPP won 51 per cent of the votes cast and 18 of the 24 seats in the new House of Assembly.      Continue reading

Reflections on Cheddi Jagan, 1918-1997 – By Ralph Ramkarran 

Reflections on Cheddi Jagan, 1918-1997

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Reflections of Cheddi Jagan (1918-1997) – By Ralph Ramkarran

REFLECTIONS ON CHEDDI JAGAN (1918-1997)

By Ralph Ramkarran – 
Friday, 23rd March 2018  – Conversation Tree Blog

Cheddi and Janet Jagan

Cheddi Jagan returned from studies in the United States to a British Guiana in 1943 that was a cauldron of poverty. The report of the Moyne Commission, which investigated poverty in the region in the 1930s concluded that “for the laboring population, mere subsistence was increasingly problematic.” The report was so explosive that it was not published until 1945. It weighed heavily in subsequent developments.

In 1946 Cheddi Jagan, Janet Jagan, Jocelyn Hubbard and Ashton Chase, the latter two of whom were active trade unionists, formed the Political Affairs Committee (PAC). In 1947 Cheddi Jagan fought and won a seat in the Legislative Council.        Continue reading

This Elderly Gentleman Welcomes AGE EIGHTY – by Francis Quamina Farrier

This Elderly Gentleman Welcomes AGE EIGHTY – by Francis Quamina Farrier

Francis Quamina Farrier

Please permit me to inform you that on March 12, 2018, I celebrated my Eightieth Birthday. I am hard pressed to realize it, since it seems to me as though it was only last year that I celebrated my 18th birthday. Now here I am at eighty years of age!

Goodness, Gracious, me! So it gives me great pleasure to relate to you, just a few of the things which happened in British Guiana/Guyana and the rest of the World, during the early and later portions of the past eight decades, and which I enjoy talking about from time to time.      Continue reading

Politics: October 5, 1992 destroyed Guyana; can it be reborn? – by Freddie Kissoon 

October 5, 1992 destroyed Guyana; can it be reborn?

 Oct 10, 2017 –  Features / ColumnistsFreddie Kissoon 

I don’t write about October 5, 1992 anymore. It has gone from my lexicon of historical milestones. Factually, it is a milestone. Philosophically it symbolizes everything that is ontologically defective about Guyana’s existence.

The closest analogy of October 5 in terms of degeneracy is the French Revolution. The rebellion of the oppressed in France led to a revolution that degenerated into psychotic excesses. The French Revolution led to dictatorship.     Continue reading

Update from Moray House Trust: June 2015

Moray House Trust

Moray House Trust

Update from Moray House Trust: June 2015

Moray House Trust was honoured to host the launch of a biography about Eric and Jessica Huntley in April. Eric and Jessica Huntley were pioneer publishers and political activists in the UK, after they migrated from Guyana in the 1950s. Jessica was a founding member of the Women’s Political and Economic Organisation in 1946 along with Janet Jagan, Janet Jagan and others. Jessica was, in the words of Tom Dalgety, “an encourager of many who wanted to say something but had no audience.”

Eric Huntley presented a collection of books, documents and recordings to Moray House Trust in the course of his recent visit to Guyana. He expressed his gratitude to the Trust for hosting two events. The first, held in October 2013, was to honour his wife, Jessica Huntley, on her passing. The second event, in April 2015, was the launch of a biography of the Huntleys entitled “Doing Nothing is not an Option”.   Continue reading

THE FALL OF THE PPP – by Ralph Ramkarran

 THE FALL OF THE PPP

Ralph Ramkarran

Ralph Ramkarran

Posted on May 23, 2015 – by Ralph Ramkarran

The PPP’s boast has always been that it never lost elections. While it gained the highest votes in 1964, it was the PNC that was invited to form the government, which it did in coalition with the United Force. The slogan of ‘cheated not defeated’ resounded through the decades. The slogan is once again rearing its head.

The claim that it lost as a result of fraud allows it to maintain the delusion, for the benefit of its supporters, that it has never lost elections. This also serves to protect its leaders and policies from critical analysis and corrective action and revive its historic claims to victimology, now of an openly posturing ethnic political entity, to sustain the sympathy of its innocent supporters against the tribal hordes. Continue reading

Guyana, Cheddi Jagan & the Cold War – By Rosaliene Bacchus

Three Worlds One Vision

Cheddi and Janet Jagan - Wedding Photo - Chicago USA 1943Cheddi and Janet Jagan – Wedding Photo – Chicago/USA – 1943
Photo Credit: Cheddi Jagan Research Centre

On Saturday, at the People’s Climate Los Angeles – Building Blocks against Climate Change, I had the opportunity to chat with the leader of the small contingent from the Communist Party USA. I learned that he had visited Guyana in 1967.

In the 1960s, in what was then British Guiana, the Catholic Church had drilled the fear of communism into my young impressionable mind. Those were the days of the Cold War. With their dread of the Soviet Union and fear of another Cuba in their backyard, the US government covertly ousted from power Guyana’s populist East Indian leader, the Marxist Cheddi Jagan.

“I met Cheddi Jagan and his wife, Janet,” the white American male said with pride.

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My Vote – by Ron Persaud

My Vote – by Ron Persaud

On Monday, the 27th. April 1953, I finally understood what my vote really meant.

On that date, the first general election, under Adult Suffrage (one man/woman = one vote), took place in that British colony in South America that we all know or remember so well. The vision of Internal Self Government greatly excited the generations of my parents and grandparents. Inevitably, that enthusiasm rubbed off on my generation, on the cusp of my teenage years.

I was bombarded on all fronts – at home, at school and by various relatives – in Leguan especially, where I used to spend all my school holidays.
My dad would be called a political junkie today. He clipped and pasted newspaper cuttings as a hobby and in the months leading up to the elections he clipped and pasted everything, or so it seemed.                     Continue reading