Tag Archives: – By Vibert Cambridge

GUYANA: The Sweet Drink Wars Prestige Competitions: Tie-ins – By Vibert Cambridge

September 12, 2021 – By

Tie-in marketing is an approach in which a company purposefully creates an association between the company, its products or services, and whatever is trending or hot in the collective consciousness at that moment. Since 1956, the hot beverage in British Guiana has been Banks Beer. In 1955, under the slogan “people’s capitalism,” Peter D’Aguiar launched the public company Banks Breweries Ltd, the first brewery in British Guiana. It made good sense as an import substitution. Beer and other malted beverages had previously been imported. Substantial amounts of beer, ale, and stout were consumed in the hot and humid colony.

The term “people’s capitalism,” although seemingly oxymoronic, was brilliant in the context of the political jargon of the time. Share price was BG$1. This allowed working-class people to invest in the company.        Continue reading

GUYANA: The Sweet Drink Wars: Advertising: Newspapers, Posters, Cinemas, and Radio – By Vibert Cambridge


Stabroek News – By August 29, 2021

The war for the Guyanese palate was dominated by three urban companies. D’Aguiar Brothers Ltd., Wieting and Richter’s (W&R’s) Cold Storage and Ice Depot, and the Rahaman Soda Factory deployed a wide range of traditional and innovative tactics. This installment introduces some of the advertising from the mid-1940s to the late-1970s when a severe foreign exchange crisis crippled the Guyanese economy.

Most of the advertising used by Pepsi-Cola and Coca-Cola in British Guiana between the end of World War II and the 1960s was initially developed for the U.S. market. As the examples from the British Guianese newspapers of that era show, Pepsi-Cola and Coca-Cola’s newspaper advertisements were dominated by images of Caucasian women and men in comfortable post-World War II U.S. middle-class contexts. This represented the privileging of Caucasian norms of attractiveness, modernity, progress, leisure, and sophistication. When African American faces started to represent the Pepsi-Cola and Coca-Cola brands in the United States because of the civil rights struggle and efforts to increase market share, those changes were also evident in the advertising and marketing materials sent to the colony.

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SWEET DRINK: THE LEMONADE PEOPLE and other Community-based bottlers – By Vibert Cambridge

Stabroek News – By August 1, 2021

One is not certain about the first flavors of “sweet drink” to be bottled in British Guiana.  There is high probability that among the first was lemonade.  According to recipes available from the late 19th century, lemonade may have been the dominant early flavor as the syrup could be concocted locally.

According to Hamid Mohamed of the Verdun Soda Water Factory, “the lemonade formula was straight forward—lemon oil extract, white sugar, carbonated water, citric acid, and sodium benzoate.”  This may explain the proliferation of lemonade bottlers in British Guiana from the early 20th century until their virtual extinction during the 1970s.  Collectively, they are referred to as the “Lemonade People.”    Continue reading