Daily Archives: July 26, 2013

Capitol News – TV News Videos – 25 July 2013

Capitol News – TV News Videos – 25 July 2013

  • Government supporters protest opposition’s voting down of Amaila Falls Hydro Project
  • Gamble with the Local Government Bills continues in the National Assembly
  • More enforcement on the cards to address Trafficking In Persons – Minister Persaud
  • Social Activist Gaskin challenges framers of the Amaila Falls deal
  • Flair, Fashion and Food at InterGuianas Festival in Cayenne, French Guiana
  • Guyana Amazon Warriors look forward to challenge in upcoming CPL T/20

View TV News videos below:-

Government supporters protest opposition’s voting down of Amaila Falls Hydro ProjectPosted: 25 Jul 2013 06:28 PM PDT

While Parliament was in full swing inside of the National Assembly, outside Government supporters were protesting the opposition’s voting down of a Bill and a Motion which would have helped paved the way for the Amaila Falls Hydro Project. While the Government were having their say, opposition supporters of the APNU joined the picket line […]    Continue reading

Playing Marbles – by Peter Halder

Playing Marbles

by Peter Halder

Playing marbles was a popular culture and pastime for boys growing up in British Guiana in the 1940s and 1950s. It was played in the open spaces of home yards,  school yards, playing fields and across roads. It was variously called playing marbles, pitching marbles, pitching taw (marble) or “jummin” . The two most favoured varieties were “holes” and “jummin”. The games were played for fun or for buttons.

 Holes

There were 1-hole, 2-hole, 3-hole and 4-hole games. Depending on what variety was played, one, two,  three or four, round holes were dug, circumference usually about three inches and not deep. A heel and sole of a boy’s foot were used to round and smooth each hole after a calabash of water from the standpipe was poured around and into them to soften the ground.     Read More »

This is just one of many  historical articles on Guyana written by Peter Halder that will be published on Guyanese Online.  You can read them all at Peter Halder’s website:  http://peterhalder.wordpress.com/

Meadow Bank Many, Many Years Ago

Meadow Bank Many, Many Years Ago

by Peter Halder

Meadow Bank, East Bank Demerara, located some two miles south of Georgetown, has undergone a significant transformation from the village it was some 175 years ago. Around that time, its population was overrun with Portuguese and it became the centre of the Catholic Church in Guyana.

With the abolition of slavery in 1834, many of the African slaves who worked on sugar estates eagerly left the inhuman and barbaric conditions on the estates to seek their fortune and future elsewhere.

Portuguese from Madeira began arriving as indentured immigrants in 1835. By 1882, over 30,000 Portuguese had immigrated to then British colony.  Many settled at Meadow Bank. As a result, Meadow Bank became the centre of the Catholic Church.       Read More »

This is just one of many  historical articles on Guyana written by Peter Halder that will be published on Guyanese Online.  You can read them all at Peter Halder’s website:  http://peterhalder.wordpress.com/

Meet global corruption’s hidden players – by Charmian Gooch

Charmian Gooch: Meet global corruption’s hidden players

Published on Jul 8, 2013   – TED Talk 

When the son of the president of a desperately poor country starts buying mansions and sports cars on an official monthly salary of $7,000, Charmian Gooch suggests, corruption is probably somewhere in the picture. In a blistering, eye-opening talk (and through several specific examples), she details how global corruption trackers follow the money — to some surprisingly familiar faces.

PPP Wanted gridlock on Amaila to drum up Congress fever – Nagamootoo

PPP Wanted gridlock on Amaila to drum up Congress fever – Nagamootoo

Dear Editor

On July 18, during what I would describe as one of the “dumb” debates in which both Government and Opposition alternated to be silent, Minister Irfaan Ali confidently denied that the raising of the national debt ceiling from $1 billion to $150 billion, has nothing to do with the cash-strapped Guyana Power and Light (GPL). I was stunned by that display of such enormous ignorance!

The debt ceiling has everything to do with GPL, as the guarantee would open the gate to borrowing by GPL in connection with the Amaila Falls Hydro Project (AFHP).

When taken, the additional $150 billion would send up our national debt in nominal Guyana dollars to some $530 billion, more than double of what it has been under the PNC government, up to 1992.        Continue reading

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