Category Archives: Sports

Commentary: Hooper and Chanderpaul — By Dave Martins + video

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“What’s your favourite Tradewinds song, and which one you feel has had the strongest reaction?” I’ve been asked questions like that often; just this week it popped up again.  On the first question, my favourite, it depends on when you ask me; some days it’s Is We Own; some days it’s Angel Wings, a song about my mother and my own life; some days it’s Copycats. On the second question, I suspect Not A Blade O’ Grass would be the answer but Honeymooning Couple is close.

It’s interesting though that only one interviewer – a very astute Guyanese lady – has ever asked me the parallel question: “Which song do you feel had the weakest response?”  The answer to that one, hands down, is Hooper and Chanderpaul, and therewith, as they say, hangs a tale.        Continue reading

RACISM: West Indies cricket legend Michael Holding discussing racism in the UK – VIDEOS

RACISM: West Indies legend Michael Holding breaks down discussing racism in the UK

Holding recently made headlines after making an impassioned plea over racism in the UK during a rain break in the test match between England and the West Indies.

CRICKET: See Michael Holding bowling in 1976 vs England in video below.  This is an example of his devastating fast-bowling :

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CRICKET: West Indies-England Test series misses chance to honour the great Learie Constantine

West Indies-England Tests will now be known as the Richards-Botham series, but it would have been an opportunity to pay tribute to a man whose biggest influence came off the field – Learie Constantine

Learie Constantine was a West Indies international in the 1930s, and went on to become a barrister and member of the House of Lords.

Learie Constantine was a West Indies international in the 1930s. He went on to become a barrister and member of the House of Lords. Photograph: Central Press/Getty Images

at Old Trafford. Published onFri 24 Jul 2020 – The Guardian        

UK: Caribbean Cricket Club, Leeds: How cricket helped Windrush migrants ‘integrate’

By Marc Higginson  — BBC Sport – From the section  Cricket

The Caribbean Cricket Club team after a match in Yorkshire
The Caribbean Cricket Club team after a match in Yorkshire

When Alford Gardner stepped off the Empire Windrush – a ship bringing about 500 migrants to the UK from the Caribbean – he, like his fellow passengers, was about to embark on a storied journey: one that would see him build a life for himself in a land more than 4,000 miles from home.

Jamaica, where Alford was from, and Leeds, where Alford was to settle, couldn’t have been more different in 1948.  Yet there was one thing which was central to the life of people in both places – cricket.

Within months of arriving in the UK, the country’s first Caribbean Cricket Club had been formed.           Continue reading

CRICKET: West Indies win First Test versus England by 4 wickets – ESPNCricinfo.com

Jason Holder hails fourth-day bowling effort to set up ‘special’ West Indies win

Jason Holder and John Campbell celebrate victory

Jason Holder  has described the fourth day of the Ageas Bowl Test as “by far the best effort” he had seen from a West Indies team during his time as captain and “one of the best” in his tenure.

West Indies took five wickets at a cost of just 30 runs at the end of a long day in the field, with Holder making the vital breakthrough in dismissing his opposite number Ben Stokes for the second time in the Test before Alzarri Joseph and Man of the Match Shannon Gabriel shared four more.

Read more: https://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_/id/29452445/jason-holder-hails-fourth-day-bowling-effort-set-special-west-indies-win

Vancouver’s Favourite Umpire – Abe Mortimer – by Donna Sacuta 

BC Black pioneer was lumber-worker, athlete, soldier, storyteller and Hall of Famer

ABE NORTIMER  – Researched and written by Donna Sacuta 

Abe Mortimer was manager-coach of the IWA Local 1-217 baseball team in the 1940s. He may have thrown a few uncomplimentary remarks at the opposing pitcher.

On September 2, 1965,

75-year old Abe Mortimer bellowed “Pla-a-a-y B-a-a-w-w-l” before an audience of more than 2,500 at Capilano Stadium in Vancouver to kick off a two-inning Old-Timers’ baseball game. Abe had broken his leg in three places the previous December and was not working as many games as he used to. The Master of Ceremonies was none other than Nat Bailey whose name graces the stadium to this day. The crowd roared their approval as Abe’s famous voice echoed off the grandstands in Little Mountain Park.          Continue reading

INTERVIEW: CRICKET: Sonny Ramadhin: ‘In 1950 we had the three W’s – England had Len Hutton’

Last survivor of West Indies’ first Test win in England 70 years ago recalls a heady day at Lord’s, a tough childhood in Trinidad and his love of English pitches

Sonny Ramadhin’s spin accounted for 11 England wickets in West Indies’ historic Test victory at Lord’s in 1950.
 Sonny Ramadhin’s spin accounted for 11 England wickets in West Indies’ historic Test victory at Lord’s in 1950. The tourists won by 326 runs. Photograph: Chris Bethell/the Guardian

As England’s last wicket fell at Lord’s in June 1950, a handful of West Indies fans spilled over the boundary rope, keen to celebrate their first Test victory at the home of their cricket-inventing colonisers.

At his home in Delph on the edge of Saddleworth Moor, Sonny Ramadhin, the last living player from that history-making West Indies side, remembers the scenes. “Quite a few of the West Indians came on to the ground and we had to run to the dressing room,” the 91-year-old says.      Continue reading

CRICKET: Sir Everton Weekes – the last of the three Ws – dies aged 95

By George Dobell – Senior correspondent at ESPNcricinfo

Sir Everton Weekes in 2013

Sir Everton Weekes, (< see stats here) last member of the legendary Three Ws, has died at the age of 95.

Alongside Sir Clyde Walcott and Sir Frank Worrell, Weekes formed a formidable batting unit in the West Indies team. All three were born within a couple of miles of one another – rumour has it they were delivered by the same midwife – within 18 months in Barbados between August 1924 and January 1926, and all made their Test debuts within three weeks in early 1948.

While all went on to enjoy outstanding careers – Worrell became West Indies’ first black captain and was later a senator in Jamaica, while Walcott averaged 56.68 in Test cricket and later became the first non-white chair of the ICC – Weekes was, arguably, the best batsman of the three.        Continue reading

BOOK: Cricket:1973 and Me – By Colin Babb on The England v West Indies Test Series

By Colin Babb         http://colinbabbauthor.com/1973-and-me/

The England v West Indies Test Series and a Memorable Childhood Year

“… a vital account of the spirit, dynamism and cultural transformation of cricket brought about by West Indian cricketers.” COLIN GRANT, HISTORIAN, AUTHOR AND BROADCASTER  re 1973 and Me

From 1968 to 1973, the West Indies did not win a Test series. They lost 2-0 on their previous England tour in 1969. By 1973, and despite this lack of success, West Indian cricket still played a central role as a medium of Caribbean self-expression in Britain. In the summer of 1973, could the West Indies deliver the performances and results to inspire the Caribbean diaspora in Britain?            Continue reading

SPORTS: What cricket means to West Indians – By Sean Devers

Presently just the thought of West Indies cricket can take one into deep depression. Administrators, who only serve their own agendas, players, most of whom seem only motivated by money and fans who have lost all interest in watching Test cricket that involves a weak West Indies team are ‘normal’ today.
But when Jamaican Robert Karl Nunes led the West Indies onto Lords on June 23rd 1928 to face England, it marked the birth of one of the most colourful and exciting teams to play test cricket and provided a major opportunity for West Indians to gain international acclaim.

In the early days the West Indies team, it comprised players from the British Federation along with British Guiana, located in South America. Today the team is made up of players from the English speaking Caribbean Islands and Guyana.            Continue reading