Tag Archives: Wordsworth McAndrew

Wordsworth McAndrew – Meche Meche, Ol’ Higue, and Cook-up Rice! – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine + video

Wordsworth McAndrew – Meche Meche, Ol’ Higue, and Cook-up Rice!

By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Wordsworth McAndrew

Wordsworth McAndrew

The speck of a curved moon sent the village into its own sense of rapture. The clouds soon parted. Moonlight was like day and the village assumed a sense of purpose and anticipation. The lone radio beckoned the people to meet and share stories. Folk tales were spun into fantastic webs: spiders spoke and the lang lady hid in the bushes as Black Sam held court with his jumbie stories.

The Murphy radio was plugged into the Berec dry cell battery and the magic hour would soon approach.   Continue reading

Profile- Roy Brummell: Teacher, Artist, Folklorist – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Profile- Roy Brummell: Teacher, Artist, Folklorist – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Roy Brummell is a man of many parts. He is a writer, teacher, folklorist and artist and if he is the mood he can even paint a house with many beautiful colors.

Roy was born at Dartmouth Village in the Essequibo coast of Guyana and he went to school there. His mom Burley and his dad Joel Headley Brummell worked hard to provide for and to educate the family. Roy attended St. Barnabas and Darmouth Government Schools. He said that his teachers played an important role in his life. Sidney Williams, the sports teacher, lived across the street and he would encourage Roy to take an active role in sports. Cyril Sewsankar was the reading teacher and he would send across reading materials that included magazines and newspapers and the Reader’s Digest.  Continue reading

PORK-KNOCKERS: A DYING BREED By Francis Quamina Farrier

PORK-KNOCKERS: A DYING BREED   By Francis Quamina Farrier

Porknocker

Dick Manning, Pork-Knocker

The days of the Pork-knockers are just about over. That is the opinion of one who prefers to be described as  a “Small Miner”. In an interview with veteran Pork-knocker, Dick Manning, he advanced the view that what has traditionally been referred to as “pork-knocking” no longer occurs. Small groups of men who use pick axes, shovels, and sheer mussel power to dig for gold and diamonds, is all but extinct in this the second decade of the 21st. century.

“We are no longer Pork-knockers”, Manning told me with a practical expression on his weather-beaten, yet handsome face, which is adorned with an extremely long white beard, separated into eight lengthy plaits.   Continue reading

Guyana: Rosie McAndrew visits after 40 years – commentary

November 3, 2013 • Stabroek News – Letter from Rosie McAndrew
Dear Editor

I have just been on my first visit to Guyana in 40 years. From 1968 to 1969, I was a VSO working for Broadcasts to Schools in Georgetown, and I came back in January 1970 to marry Wordsworth McAndrew and teach at St Joseph’s High School. Our daughter Shiri was born in 1972, I completed my Diploma in Education at UG the following summer, and only returned to England after our divorce in September 1973.

Since then, all through my exile, I have held fond memories of the beautiful Garden City that was Georgetown. I loved the elegant white wooden houses with their jalousies and delicate fretwork, in gardens overflowing with bougainvillea, hibiscus and oleander. I loved the wide avenues lined with sweeping flamboyant trees and canals sparkling in the sun. I loved the bridges over trenches to little wooden cottages on stilts, in yards brimming with palm trees and callaloo. I had an idyllic picture in my mind, and came back intent on taking actual photographs to preserve my memories in tangible form.    Continue reading

Francis Quamina Farrier in Boston – by Francis Farrier

FRANCIS QUAMINNA FARRIER in BOSTON

By: Francis Farrier

My week-end in Boston was like the two masks which are mounted on the front wall of a Theatre or on a Theatre programme; One a smiling mask, the other with a sad expression.

I arrived in Boston on Friday evening, April 12, 2013. It was not only very cold but rainy and wet. Even Bostonians were shivering. This was not like my previous visit to that historic American city  when it was warm are so much more welcoming weather-wise.

My friend Gus Corbin, who was the principal organizer of my visit, met me at the Bus terminal where, together with his daughter Michelle, I was driven to the Comfort Inn. Michelle Corbin played a vital role in the production, including producing the classy promotion flyers. On Saturday, Gus and I toured around the bustling downtown area of Boston, as we put in place the details for my Storytelling and Poetry reading programme for the following evening.   Continue reading

A Tribute to Hugh Cholmondeley – By Sir Ronald Sanders

A Tribute to Hugh Cholmondeley

By Sir Ronald Sanders

Hugh Cholmondeley

To say that Hugh Neville John Cholmondeley was a golden voice of broadcasting in Guyana in the 1960’s and early 1970’s is to speak a truth but not to tell the whole story.  While he had a voice that commanded attention, it was his recognition that broadcasting had a key role to play in enlightening society that distinguished him.

In 1968, he became the first general manager of the Guyana Broadcasting Service (GBS).  In that role, he set about two important and standard setting tasks.  The first was to establish a team of outstanding broadcasters in Guyana who would extend the boundaries of radio beyond a purveyor of entertainment into the realm of debate on national issues; of investigative broadcast journalism; of reflecting the society through documentaries; and “live” coverage of national events when and as they happened.  His early radio documentary series ” was path breaking.  Continue reading

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