Tag Archives: Wieting and Richter’s (W&R’s) Cold Storage and Ice Depot

GUYANA: The Sweet Drink Wars: Advertising: Newspapers, Posters, Cinemas, and Radio – By Vibert Cambridge


Stabroek News – By August 29, 2021

The war for the Guyanese palate was dominated by three urban companies. D’Aguiar Brothers Ltd., Wieting and Richter’s (W&R’s) Cold Storage and Ice Depot, and the Rahaman Soda Factory deployed a wide range of traditional and innovative tactics. This installment introduces some of the advertising from the mid-1940s to the late-1970s when a severe foreign exchange crisis crippled the Guyanese economy.

Most of the advertising used by Pepsi-Cola and Coca-Cola in British Guiana between the end of World War II and the 1960s was initially developed for the U.S. market. As the examples from the British Guianese newspapers of that era show, Pepsi-Cola and Coca-Cola’s newspaper advertisements were dominated by images of Caucasian women and men in comfortable post-World War II U.S. middle-class contexts. This represented the privileging of Caucasian norms of attractiveness, modernity, progress, leisure, and sophistication. When African American faces started to represent the Pepsi-Cola and Coca-Cola brands in the United States because of the civil rights struggle and efforts to increase market share, those changes were also evident in the advertising and marketing materials sent to the colony.

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GUYANA: The Sweet Drink Wars – The Combatants – By Vibert Cambridge

By August 22, 2021

There has always been competition in the Guyanese aerated drink market. The persistent impulse among domestic and international bottlers and distributors has been to stimulate the consumption of the sugary beverages to increase market share. We call this the “sweet drink wars”: the battles for the palate in hot and humid Guyana.

As we saw in a previous installment, the Berbice bottlers resorted to destroying the competition’s bottles in their fight for market share. The sweet drink wars in British Guiana intensified between the 1940s and the 1970s: from the end of World War II to the mid-1970s when a severe foreign exchange crisis crippled the Guyanese economy.

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