Tag Archives: West Indies Federation

West Indies Federation Versus Confederation of Canada: Wha’ Happen? – By Clyde Duncan

Let’s Talk About West Indies Federation Versus Confederation of Canada: Wha’ Happen?

  • By Clyde Duncan – past President of Guyanese Canadian Cultural Association of B.C.

This thing about the West Indies Federation and the reasons for the failure has been around for more than 50-years. All the finger-pointing: It was the Jamaican people – It was the egos of the West Indian leadership – Let us be blunt: It was British leadership that was the source of the West Indies Federation failure. Whoever said that the sun never set on the British Empire because God never trusted an Englishman in the dark is right.

Let me tell you about Guyana-born, Sir James Douglas and Barbados-born, Colonel Richard Moody. These men spent their formative years in British Guiana, Barbados and influenced by the English-speaking Caribbean, in general; and like most of the leaders in Guyana and the English-speaking Caribbean they went overseas to better their education. The leadership of a man from Guyana and a man from Barbados are some of the reasons Canada is the second largest country in the world.
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Caribbean historian not optimistic about regional integration

Caribbean historian not optimistic about regional integration
Published on January 29, 2014 – By Andre Huie -Caribbean News Now
BASSETERRE, St Kitts (WINN) — While the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) pushes the agenda of regional integration, noted Caribbean historian Dr Lennox Honeychurch from Dominica is not that optimistic that this will materialize. He is instead turning his hope on closer integration of the Organization of Eastern Caribbean StatesOECS countries   [read more on OECS]

lennox_honeychurch.jpg
Dr Lennox Honeychurch

“The Caribbean will never come together because of this individualism,” Honeychurch said.

“That is why I have given up on CARICOM; yes let them have their meetings, let them have their big bureaucracy down there in Guyana, but really nothing is going to happen with them. I put more faith in the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States but I do not see a political union,” he added.

A guest on WINN Fm’s Voices programme last Wednesday January 22, Honeychurch recounted the attempts to regionalism in the West Indies Federation of the 1950s and the role the OECS, particularly St Kitts and Nevis played in that construct.   Continue reading

Labouring in the Vineyard – Sir Shridath Ramphal

Labouring in the Vineyard

Sir Shridath Ramphal’s Eric Williams Lecture in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, on May 26, 2012.

I hope the advent of electronic ‘readers’ does not mean that there will no longer be books for authors to inscribe  to their friends on publication. Some of my most treasured books are of that kind; among them, none more treasured than the copy of From Columbus to Castro: The History of the Caribbean 1492 – 1969,   inscribed as follows:

My dear Sonny
We are both labourers in the vineyard.
It is in this spirit that I send you this book
Bill.

That was 1970. “Bill”, of course, was Prime Minister Eric Williams. The vineyard was economic integration. West Indians were nurturing Caribbean unity from the CARIFTA seedling to the sapling of Caribbean Community.  The blossoms of CARICOM and the Treaty of Chaguaramas had actually sprouted. In this Lecture, I want to follow that inscription through the decades that have passed, asking what has come of our labours – what is the state of the vineyard?

The Eric Williams Memorial Lecture has a distinguished vintage; I am honoured and humbled to have been invited to join the list of those who have given it over the years. I thank the organisers and all those responsible for the invitation, and the Governor of the Central Bank, in particular, Mr Ewart Williams. And I am twice honoured, in giving the Lecture in this special year of the 50th Anniversary of Trinidad and Tobago’s Independence.

With Jamaica, you mark this year the first 50 years of West Indian freedom in its larger sense; and you have much of which to be proud.

Today, May 26th, also marks 46 years of the independence of Guyana whose initial Constitution I had a hand in drafting as its Attorney-General.  But there are ironies which I must share with you – and questions which I hope you will allow me to ask.

   Read complete lecture : [Labouring in the Vineyard – Sir Shridath Ramphal]