Tag Archives: Sydney King

Eusi Kwayana: A Guyanese Political Legend turns 90 – By Dr. David Hinds

Eusi Kwayana: A Guyanese Political Legend turns 90

By Dr. David Hinds

eusi Kwayana -in 2014

Eusi Kwayana -in 2014

 Today, April 4, 2015, Eusi Kwayana turns 90. It is difficult to properly analyze modern Guyanese politics without taking into consideration Eusi Kwayana’s wide ranging contributions. His political career has spanned the seven decades, which mirrors the period normally referred to as the modern phase of Guyanese and Caribbean politics. This article pays tribute to Kwayana by offering an overview of his political life and work.

Political Biography

Eusi Kwayana, formerly Sydney King, was born 1925 and has been involved in Guyana’s national politics since 1947.He has been referred to as the “Sage of Buxton,”“Renaissance Man”and “Guyana’s Gandhi,” among other descriptions. He is multi-faceted– political activist, educator, writer, journalist, dramatist, folklorist and historian. But it is as a political activist that Kwayana has made his most telling contribution. He has become one of Guyana’s most distinguished political leaders. Ironically, he has also been one of the most controversial and misunderstood public personalities.   Continue reading

Guyana’s Eusi Kwayana will be 90 on April 4, 2015

Eusi Kwayana will be 90 on April 4, 2015  – (see note at end of this entry)

eusi Kwayana -in 2014

eusi Kwayana -in 2014 at the Walter Rodney Inquiry

The following links were compiled by the St Stanislaus College Blog

 Eusi Kwayana, formerly Sydney King (born 4 April 1925),[1] is a Guyanese politician. A cabinet minister in the People’s Progressive Party (PPP) government of 1953, he was detained by the British Army in 1954. Later he left the PPP to form ASCRIA (African Society for Cultural Relations with Independent Africa), a Pan-Africanist grassroots political group that, after a brief flirtation with the People’s National Congress (PNC) of Forbes Burnham, fused into the Working People’s Alliance (WPA).

Biography  – From Wikipedia.org: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eusi_Kwayana He was born in Lusignan, Guyana, and his family moved to Buxton when he was aged seven. He became a primary school teacher at the age of 15. In 1956 he founded and became principal of County High School, later renamed Republic Cooperative High School, in Buxton.[2]    Continue reading

My Vote – by Ron Persaud

My Vote – by Ron Persaud

On Monday, the 27th. April 1953, I finally understood what my vote really meant.

On that date, the first general election, under Adult Suffrage (one man/woman = one vote), took place in that British colony in South America that we all know or remember so well. The vision of Internal Self Government greatly excited the generations of my parents and grandparents. Inevitably, that enthusiasm rubbed off on my generation, on the cusp of my teenage years.

I was bombarded on all fronts – at home, at school and by various relatives – in Leguan especially, where I used to spend all my school holidays.
My dad would be called a political junkie today. He clipped and pasted newspaper cuttings as a hobby and in the months leading up to the elections he clipped and pasted everything, or so it seemed.                     Continue reading

Eusi Kwayana Toronto visit and brief Bio – by Michael Parris

Eusi Kwayana’s planned visit to Toronto (Sep 27-Oct6,2012) with a brief Bio written by Michael Parris.

Eusi Kwayana, formerly named Sydney King, is scheduled to be visit Toronto during September 27 to October 6, 2012, as a guest of The Committee to Assist Buxton/Friendship (COTAB), which has been operating here since 2000.  He will be featured at events sponsored by COTAB, the Caribbean Studies Program of the University of Toronto, and the Canada – Guyana Forum.

Briefly, the events are:

Sponsored by COTAB

Friday Sept. 28, 6 – 9 PM:       Book Signing at the Different Booklist (746 Bathurst, Toronto)

Sunday Sept. 30th, 5 – 8 PM:  Lecture & Mix’N Mingle session (St. John the Divine Anglican Church, 885 Scarborough Golf Club Rd)                   Continue reading