Tag Archives: President Maduro – Venezuela

What Next for Venezuela? – By Mark Weisbrot – News Analysis

What Next for Venezuela?

Saturday, 19 December 2015 – By Mark Weisbrot, The Hill | News Analysis

  • Venezuela’s opposition has won a large majority of the country’s legislature, or National Assembly, for the first time in 16 years. Many observers in Washington see this as a tipping point for Venezuelan politics.

What are we to make of this development? First, an endless stream of news articles,newspaper editorials and proclamations — such as from the secretary general of the Organization of American States (OAS) — denouncing the Venezuelan electoral process and insisting on “credible” election monitors (by which they meant OAS monitors beholden to Washington) were wrong. Quoting out-of-context remarks from Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro and adding other misleading statements, inaccuracies about “gerrymandering,” and more, they created a fear that the government would not accept the results if it lost.    Continue reading

Venezuela’s Changing Relationship With CARICOM – By David Jessop

Venezuela’s Changing Relationship With CARICOM – By David Jessop

Maduro at UN

News Americas, LONDON, England, Tues. Nov. 10, 2015: As with so much in politics it is often what is not seen, said or fully understood that drives events. This is particularly so in the case of Venezuela’s changing relationship with the countries of CARICOM.

In recent months Caracas has been deepening its sub-regional relations and has escalated its border dispute with Guyana. It has also encouraged CARICOM to be less than emphatic in its support for Georgetown’s position.

At the same time, it has been moving rapidly to consolidate its relationship with, in particular, the OECS, Trinidad and Suriname by offering increased levels of support or investments, largely through its concessional PetroCaribe oil and development assistance programs.  Continue reading

Guyana: “Essequibo Is We Own” – By Rosaliene Bacchus

Three Worlds One Vision

Map of Guyana - Disputed Area being claimed by Venezuela

Map of Guyana: “Disputed Territory” (salmon-pink) claimed by Venezuela
Source: Caracas Chronicles

Guyana struck black gold in May 2015! American oil giant ExxonMobil estimates that their find amounts to at least 700 million barrels of crude oil, valued at US$40 billion, over ten times Guyana’s entire economy (GDP). The elation of Guyana’s newly-elected government was short-lived. Within weeks, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro issued a decree claiming sovereignty over the ExxonMobil’s drill site along with the rest of Guyana’s territorial waters off the Essequibo region. [That Guyana should keep it in the ground is another story.]

Venezuela persists in a belief that the entire region west of the Essequibo River, including the islands in the river, is rightfully theirs. With over 50,000 square miles of savanna and forest cover, the Essequibo Region makes up about two-thirds of Guyana’s total territory.

View original post 351 more words

Venezuela’s relations with Guyana – commentary

Venezuela’s relations with Guyana

Guyana -Venezuela - Disputed territoryMARCH 8, 2015 · BY Stabroek News – Editorial

The week before last Takuba Lodge issued a press release stating that Foreign Minister Delcy Rodríguez of Venezuela had raised an objection with the Country Manager of Esso Exploration and Production Guyana Ltd about the dispatch of an oil rig from Louisiana to an exploratory concession granted by the Government of Guyana.

The site identified for the drilling is called Liza, which is located off the coast of Demerara within the Stabroek Block. Needless to say, it is situated well within Guyana’s waters, and while Venezuela’s spurious claim to this country’s land space has never encompassed territory east of the Essequibo River, the Stabroek Block does extend into offshore Essequibo. The implications of this, one supposes, is the primary reason for Venezuela’s objection.

The latest protest from our western neighbour follows an ingrained pattern whereby it has attempted to thwart any major development on land or sea in Essequibo over the past few decades, be it a hydroelectric project, a spaceport, or an exploratory concession for oil.   Continue reading