Tag Archives: Musical Life in Guyana

Update from Moray House Trust: July 2015 – includes videos

For Guyanese Online

Moray House Trust

Moray House Trust

Update from Moray House Trust: July 2015

On a rainy evening in mid-July, Professor Ivelaw Griffith, a specialist on Caribbean and hemispheric security, drugs and crime, spoke about ‘Regime Change and Expectations Management: Crime and other quotidian security challenges facing Guyana.

Professor Griffith invoked Dickens, Voltaire and Martin Carter in the course of his arguments. He reminded us that we have the dubious distinction in Guyana of one of the highest rates of domestic violence in the world. Our homicide rate is also very high. These, and many other strands, weave together to form the ‘landscape of anxiety’ that prevails, the backdrop to our daily lives.  Continue reading

NO MUSICAL ENGINE HERE – by Dave Martins.

Dave Martins

Dave Martins

NO MUSICAL ENGINE HERE – by Dave Martins.

Following recent musical explorations in the country, including Dr. Vibert Cambridge’s excellent book, “Musical Life in Guyana”, the current depressed state of our music industry is once again a topic of discussion. We are hearing renewed calls for more music education in the schools, and for ways to make instruments more affordable.

A well-known music teacher stressed the need to identify and foster singular musical talent. Some have called for the creation of a Guyanese “national sound”, and there has been the inevitable shout for government funding for music studios and facilities. It is fair to say that, particularly following Dr. Cambridge’s book, serious concerns have been raised about the state of our music industry today.  Continue reading

Book: Musical Life in Guyana: History and Politics of Controlling Creativity – Vibert C. Cambridge

Musical Life in Guyana: History and Politics of Controlling Creativity (Caribbean Studies Series) Hardcover – June 1, 2015

cambridge

by Vibert C. Cambridge (Author)

Musical Life in Guyana is the first in-depth study of Guyanese musical life. It is also a richly detailed description of the social, economic, and political conditions that have encouraged and sometimes discouraged musical and cultural creativity in Guyana.

The book contributes to the study of the interactions between the policies and practices by national governments and musical communities in the Caribbean.

Vibert C. Cambridge explores these interactions in Guyana during the three political eras that the society experienced as it moved from being a British colony to an independent nation.   Continue reading