Tag Archives: Montreal

20 Great Cities Around the World – in 90 Seconds – videos

 20 Great Cities Around the World – in 90 Seconds
I didn’t know which city I should visit next, so I was blown away by these stunning and informative 90 second videos of the world’s 20 top places. Starting from Chicago, head eastward across ‘the pond’ through exquisite Paris, fascinating Prague, luxurious Dubai and exotic Bangkok right back to America’s West Coast. Spend 90 seconds in each city and give yourself a taste of the best the world has to offer. 
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 1. Chicago, USA
We start our tour in this utterly complete city. With great universities, world famous shops & restaurants – plus the magnificent Lake Michigan – Chicago attracts over 50 million people, and you’d be mad not to join them.
 This is just the first of 20 short videos.

Copa Airlines to fly Panama- Guyana route


Copa Air
Copa Airlines to fly Panama- Guyana route       

Panama City, Panama – Jan.  22, 2014 – Copa Airlines, subsidiary of Copa Holdings, S.A., {NYSE: CPA}, announced Wednesday its growth plans for the first half of 2014 including new direct flights from Panama to Georgetown, Guyana.

Other direct flights are from Panama to: Montreal, Canada, and Fort Lauderdale, Fla.  In addition, Copa will add aircraft to its fleet, for a 10 percent growth in seating capacity.

The new routes will strengthen Copa’s position in regional air travel and provide passengers in Georgetown, Montreal and Fort Lauderdale the fastest and most efficient way to connect with Latin America via Copa’s Hub of the Americas at Tocumen International Airport in Panama, thus increasing travel options and improving connections throughout Copa Airlines’ extensive route network.   Continue reading

The gentle revolutionary: Jan Carew at 90

The gentle revolutionary: Jan Carew at 90

By David Austin

David Austin lives in Montreal and is the editor of the recently published book: ‘You Don’t Play with Revolution: The Montreal Lectures of CLR James.’ He recently spoke at an event celebrating Jan Carew’s 90th birthday sponsored by the Department of Pan-African Studies at the University of Louisville in Kentucky. He shared the platform with Eusi Kwayana.

Jan Carew, who celebrated his 90th birthday on September 24,  has lived an extraordinary and itinerant life, or many overlapping lives, and seemingly many lifetimes. He begins in Guyana, but in many ways his life defies space and time. He is the quintessential diasporic persona, a happy wanderer whose presence helped to shape seminal moments in the lives of people of African and Caribbean descent.

Jan reported for the London Observer on the Cuban Missile Crisis from Havana; joined the Laurence Olivier Company in the 1950s and acted in several plays while simultaneously working for the BBC. He also studied dentistry at Charles University in Czechoslovakia and travelled to and wrote about Russia and people of African descent.

Jan worked alongside Claudia Jones and other notable Black and Caribbean figures as they attempted to humanize Britain, to liberate the decaying empire from itself and its legacy of colonialism and racism in the 1950s. He wrote several books of fiction, including Moscow is Not My Mecca, Black Midas, The Wild Coast and The Last Barbarian and several generations of West Indians were weaned on his children’s stories. He served as director of culture in Guyana in 1962 and an advisor to the Publicity Secretariat and editor of African Review in Ghana (1965-1966) and was detained when President Kwame Nkrumah was deposed in a military coup.

During his sojourn in Canada (1966-1969), Jan became the centre of a burgeoning literary scene, writing and mounting plays, including Behind God’s Back which, adapted from a short story by Austin Clarke, aired on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television in 1969. He started Cotopaxi, a literary journal that included poets and future University of the West Indies professor Cliff Lashley, Canadian poet Milton Acorn, and Jamaican Rudolph Murray, future editor of Black Images, arguably Canada’s first national Black arts and culture magazine. Still in Canada, he was active, and a voice of reason within, the Black Power movement, and later joined forces with Indigenous peoples in Canada’s Red Power movement.         Continue reading

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