Tag Archives: Martin Carter

A NEW AWARD – THE STALWARTS – By Dave Martins + video

Now and then, in the day-to-day, you will find yourself engrossed in something when an idea for something quite different comes to your mind like a light turning on.  Just this week, for example, I found myself caught up watching an absorbing online post from Maya Trotz of a speech by Brian Meeks in which he dealt with the intricacies of the Grenada Revolution in the time of Maurice Bishop.

For those who may not be familiar with his work, BrianMeeks is a Caribbean poet and academic from Jamaica.  He is Professor of Africana Studies and Chair of the Africana Studies/Rites and Reason Theatre Department at Brown University, and while I was aware of his reputation this was the first time I heard him speak, and I was entranced.    Continue reading

Hope: Guyana’s history and the names of some “Great Guyanese”

 By Geoff Burrowes

When I was growing up I knew a mild mannered boy named Malcolm Rodrigues. His nickname was “Milky”. I later heard that he had become a Jesuit priest.

When many of us, decided that life under the heel of the Forbes Burnham regime was not supportable and emigrated to other countries to enjoy their freedoms, Malcolm continued to minister in Guyana. I recently read an article written by him about the martyrdom of Father Darke and realized that Malcolm had grown into a courageous priest who had stood up against the excesses of the politicians of the time. I guess that his Jesuit training and expectations were partially responsible for that growth.          Continue reading

Francis Quamina Farrier in Boston – by Francis Farrier

FRANCIS QUAMINNA FARRIER in BOSTON

By: Francis Farrier

My week-end in Boston was like the two masks which are mounted on the front wall of a Theatre or on a Theatre programme; One a smiling mask, the other with a sad expression.

I arrived in Boston on Friday evening, April 12, 2013. It was not only very cold but rainy and wet. Even Bostonians were shivering. This was not like my previous visit to that historic American city  when it was warm are so much more welcoming weather-wise.

My friend Gus Corbin, who was the principal organizer of my visit, met me at the Bus terminal where, together with his daughter Michelle, I was driven to the Comfort Inn. Michelle Corbin played a vital role in the production, including producing the classy promotion flyers. On Saturday, Gus and I toured around the bustling downtown area of Boston, as we put in place the details for my Storytelling and Poetry reading programme for the following evening.   Continue reading

Guyanese-born Poets Etch our Nation’s Journey in Verse

On the Anniversary of Guyana’s Independence Day: Guyanese-born Poets Etch our Nation’s Journey in Verse

by Rosaliene Bacchus

Guyana Independence Arch – Georgetown – Guyana  – “Monument to Freedom” unveiled on 22 May 1966, a gift from the Demerara Bauxite Company (DEMBA) to the people of Guyana on their independence. Source: flickriver.com (arichards gallery)

On 26 May 2012, Guyana celebrated forty-six years as an independent nation. I recall well that night of 25 May 1966 when I stood with my family amidst the crowd in the Queen Elizabeth Park (later renamed National Park), watching the grand cultural performances to commemorate our independence from Great Britain. Just before the big moment at midnight, the crowd gasped in surprise. Our Prime Minister Forbes Burnham and his political rival and former Premier Cheddi Jagan unexpectedly embraced each other. Emotions ran deep.

The lights dimmed and wrapped us in silence. As the band intoned “God Save the Queen,” I watched the Union Jack slip down the flagpole while our new Golden Arrowhead climbed to the top where it unfurled to loud cheers and a gun salute. The sky exploded with the greatest display of fireworks I had ever seen, depicting Kaieteur Falls and the face of our Prime Minister. Great pride surged through my young veins. Our nation was born.   [read more]

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