Tag Archives: Japanese

USA POLITICS: Asian Americans’ political preferences have flipped from red to blue – BY: John A. Tures

Professor of Political Science, LaGrange College

– September 14, 2020. The Conversation

Asian Americans used to be a reliable Republican voting bloc. But long before Kamala Harris, who is Indian American and Black, became Joe Biden’s running mate, they shifted to support the Democratic Party. This is true across ages, genders and ethnic origins of Asian Americans – including Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese and Hmong.

As a political scientist, I’m not just interested in voting, but also in how groups change their party preferences. This subject of study, known as “critical elections,” looks at how political party fortunes change over time as a result of racial, religious or regional groups’ changing views.

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Canada: B.C.’s history of racism – pursuit of a white man’s province

A look into B.C.’s history of racism, and its pursuit of a white man’s province

GARY MASON  -The Globe and Mail-  Canada – Published Friday, Jan. 10 2014

Province of British Columbia, Canada

While British Columbia is often celebrated for its physical beauty and a laid-back, open-minded culture, it is a province rooted in a little-discussed but hard-to-ignore bigoted past. This week we were reminded of just how dark some of that history is.

NDP Leader Adrian Dix drew back the curtains on some of the bleaker moments of those early days, an epoch when it was no time to be Chinese, or Japanese or South Asian for that matter, either. But it was the Chinese and Japanese, in particular, who were considered the paramount threat and treated almost singularly with contempt. Their banishment from the province would become a single-minded obsession of legislators – and the public – for more than 70 years.  Continue reading

Where Silence Is Sacred – by Pico Iyer

Where Silence is Sacred

By Pico Iyer

http://www.utne.com/Mind-Body/Where-Silence-Is-Sacred-Chapels.aspx

Giant figures are talking and strutting and singing on enormous screens above me, and someone is chattering away on the mini-screen in the cab from which I just stepped. Nine people at this street corner are shouting into thin air, wearing wires around their chins and jabbing at the screens in their hands. One teenager, I read recently, sent 300,000 text messages in a month—or 10 a minute for every minute of her waking day, assuming that she was awake 16 hours a day. There are more cell phones than people on the planet now, almost (ten mobiles for everyone at the beginning of the century). Even by the end of the past century, the average human being in a country such as ours saw as many images in a day as a Victorian inhaled in a lifetime.  Continue reading