Tag Archives: India

USA: The Future Of American Power – By: Arundhati Roy | The Economist  

Arundhati Roy | The Economist  

This By-invitation commentary is part of a series by a range of global thinkers on the future of American power, examining the forces shaping the country’s standing.

IN FEBRUARY 1989 the last Soviet tank rolled out of Afghanistan, its army having been decisively defeated in a punishing, nearly decade-long war by a loose coalition of mujahideen, who were trained, armed, funded and indoctrinated by the American and Pakistani Intelligence services.

By November that year the Berlin wall had fallen and the Soviet Union began to collapse. When the cold war ended, the United States took its place at the head of a unipolar world order. In a heartbeat, radical Islam replaced communism as the most imminent threat to world peace. After the attacks of September 11th, 2001: The political world as we knew it spun on its axis. And the pivot of that axis appeared to be located somewhere in the rough mountains of Afghanistan.         Continue reading

Commentary: Looking at the COVID-19 Down Under – by Francis Quamina Farrier

by Francis Quamina Farrier

During the past four months I have written feature articles about the COVID19 pandemic focusing on a number of countries. They include Argentina, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, India, Pakistan, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, the United Kingdom, Zambia and Zimbabwe. During the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic globally, I consider it important for Guyanese to know a bit about how other countries around the world are dealing with the pandemic.

That is so especially with our neighbour Brazil, which has an extremely high number of cases – 5 million infected and 147,000 dead. That is second only to the United States with 7.6 million infected, including the president, and 214,000 deaths. Closer home, reports are that there are some infected persons in Brazil who are crossing the Takatu border river from Bon Fim into Lethem and spreading the virus in Region 9.          Continue reading

BOOK: Golden Arrowhead—A Memoir –  by Andra Thakur

ANDRA THAKUR BOOK – GOLDEN ARROWHEAD

My book, GOLDEN ARROWHEAD, (A Memoir) has recently been published (Jaguar Press January, 2020. 360 pp. including 30 pages of maps and photos) but has not fully entered circulation due to the global pandemic.

The book is set in 24 Chapters: 9 in Guyana; 8 in Western Canada–Edmonton and Nanaimo– and 2 each in India, Thailand and West Africa–Ghana and Nigeria.

The selling price for the book is US$20. plus shipping and handling. For further information kindly contact;>>LynParboo@cs.com<< or phone 407-287-4700

    BACK COVER – COMMENTS        Continue reading

India: Rahul Gandhi: Is this the end of the Gandhi dynasty? – commentary

Rahul Gandhi

On May 29, 2019 when Indian PM Narendra Modi won a landslide victory in the Indian elections, Rahul Gandhi, the scion of the Nehru-Gandhi dynasty and leader of India’s Congress party, emerged at the other end, battered and mauled.

He is the primary heir to the ultimate poli tical dynasty. His great-grandfather, Jawaharlal Nehru, was the first and longest-serving prime minister of India. His grandmother, Indira Gandhi, was the first female prime minister of the country, and his father was India’s youngest prime minister.

If the 2014 election was Congress’ worst political showing ever, Thursday’s  (May 29, 2019) poll delivered a double blow to Mr Gandhi. Congress won just over 50 seats against the 300 plus that Mr Modi’s BJP got; and if that was not bad enough, he lost his own seat in the family bastion of Amethi in Uttar Pradesh.

READ MORE: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-48391041

History: The British economy depended on the Caribbean

The British economy depended on the Caribbean 

From Book: “The War for America” – by Piers Mackesy. 

For the British, the American Revolution quickly became a naval war with France over possession of the islands of the Caribbean. With their vast sugar plantations, these were more lucrative to Britain than the American colonies and more likely to remain colonies over the long run. Furthermore, the French had lost key Caribbean possessions to Britain during the recent French and Indian War that had ended in 1763, and viewed the American Revolution as their opportunity to regain them:

“Why this obsession [of the British] with the West Indies? [Lord] Sandwich had predicted that the war aims of France would be to overturn the peace of 1763 and regain her empire and her markets; and that for the sake of the American alliance she would forget her claim to Canada, and look for her reward in the sub-tropics — in India, West Africa and the Caribbean. And he was right.       Continue reading

Book: Drink from My Calabash – by Naraine Datt

Book: Drink from My Calabash 

The calabash or bottle gourd (not to be confused with the calabaza) is a vine grown for its fruit, which can either be harvested young and used as a vegetable or harvested mature, dried, and used as a bottle, utensil, or pipe. For this reason, one of the calabash subspecies is known as the bottle gourd. The fresh fruit has a light green smooth skin and a white flesh. However the rounder varieties are called Calabash gourds whereas the longer and slimmer kinds are usually well known as bottle gourds. The calabash was one of the first cultivated plants in the world, grown not for food but as a container. It was named for the calabash tree (Crescentia cujete).     Continue reading

Guyana’s Natural Resources: Zero Tolerance for Vaitarna and Bai Shan Lin – xpressblogg.com

Guyana- loggingOpinion - commentary -analysisThe sudden decision by China to provide aid to Guyana was hardly puzzling.

We knew that another principle of distributive justice was at work; one that was not formally articulated, perhaps deliberately muted because of the disparate goals of the parties at the deal table.

The world was already watching on at the not so subtle creep of China into the Caribbean and surrounding countries that shared the same dependency on foreign aid because the choices of their post colonial leaders – selfish governance, greed, corruption – led to economic underdevelopment and stagnation that left these countries sitting on potential they were unable to develop.

India, its equally insidious partner, was hot on its heels and did not go unnoticed, either.    Continue reading

TASSA THUNDER: Folk Music from India to the Caribbean – video

TASSA THUNDER : Folk Music from India to the Caribbean – YouTube

Published on Mar 25, 2014    – Vibert Cambridge shared this link.

This 53-minute video documentary explores Indo-Caribbean music culture through focusing on a set of neo-traditional music genres, relating them to sources and counterparts in North India’s Bhojpuri region and Indian communities in Fiji. Topics covered include chutney, chowtal, birha, nagara drumming, Ahir dance, the dantal, the Alha-Udal epic, and most extensively, tassa drumming. Tassa music is explored in reference to its rhythmic structures, its performance contexts of weddings, competitions, and Muharram (Hosay), and the construction of its drums. The film combines unique performance footage and interviews taken between 1990 and 2010 in India, Trinidad, Guyana, Suriname, New York, and Fijian communities in California. It conveys how Indo-Caribbean music culture comprises a unique and dynamic combination of both resilient marginal survivals as well as innovative forms.

The World Bank and A Changing World – By David Jessop

The World Bank and A Changing World

 By David Jessop

 the-world-bankNews Americas, LONDON, England, Tues. April 14, 12015: It is probably true to say that the average person has little idea what international financial institutions like the World Bank or International Monetary Fund (IMF) do, beyond knowing that they are in some way responsible for having governments impose tough austerity measures and conditions in return for their support.

Notwithstanding, a related issue with wide implications is emerging that warrants close attention in the Caribbean: this is the establishment of what many regard as a future rival to the World Bank in the form of the Chinese-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) with a likely different philosophy. Continue reading

Cricket: Who would win the World Cup? – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Cricket: Who would win the World Cup?

2015_Cricket_World_Cup_Logo.svgBy Dr. Dhanpaul Narine –  10-February-2015

Beyond the ball destiny lies. Stars and legends are made. Cricket’s extravaganza begins and New Zealand will be the team to beat. They are playing well and have the game to take on the best teams in the world.  Besides, New Zealand is peaking at the right moment and they are playing at home.

Valentine’s Day 2015 a love affair of a different sort will take place. It involves the cricket nations from fourteen countries and they will compete for cricket’s World Cup. This will be the eleventh such meeting; the first was in 1975 in England. Cricket fans will recall that West Indies won the 1975 and 1979 tournaments and lost in the 1983 finals to India at Lords.  Continue reading