Tag Archives: Henry Muttoo

Guyana SPEAKS: The Art of Oral Storytelling – 25th April 2021 at 2pm BST: 9am EST: 9am GYT 

To join this free event on The Art of Oral Storytelling with Doris Harper-Wills, Tuup and Henry Muttoo, please register via eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/guyana-speaks-the-art-of-oral-storytelling-tickets-148498700611
.
All Guyana SPEAKS events are recorded and by joining we assume your consent.
.,
Flyer: Art of Oral Storytelling.png
Many thanks for your continued support!
.
All the best,
Juanita & Rod
Co-Founders: Guyana SPEAKS

Ken Corsbie: The Caribbean’s Quintessential Theatre Celebrity – by Francis Quamina Farrier

 – by Francis Quamina Farrier

On March 27, Nations around the world, observed “World Theatre Day.” This annual event was established in 1962 by the International Theatre Institute (ITI) and supported by UNESCO. In this article, I am pleased to throw the spotlight on veteran Guyanese dramatist Ken Corsbie, who has been in the theatre arts for over seven decades.

Now in his early 90s, Ken Corsbie has been a member of the Theatre Guild of Guyana from its inception. However, his initial activities with theatre arts actually began at the Taitt’s Yard, now known as Cara Lodge on Quamina Street, previously Murray Street.        Continue reading

GUYANA: Arts on Sunday: In tribute to Ken Corsbie – By Al Creighton

Caribbean theatre began to experience very fundamental changes, formal developments, diversification, and other advancements from the end of the 1960s and through the 1970s. It is in that context that we are able to gauge the significant role of Guyanese theatre director, actor, writer, and administrator Ken Corsbie.

He has made a mark on Caribbean drama as a performer extraordinaire, and we take time to pay him tribute.        Continue reading

A NEW AWARD – THE STALWARTS – By Dave Martins + video

Now and then, in the day-to-day, you will find yourself engrossed in something when an idea for something quite different comes to your mind like a light turning on.  Just this week, for example, I found myself caught up watching an absorbing online post from Maya Trotz of a speech by Brian Meeks in which he dealt with the intricacies of the Grenada Revolution in the time of Maurice Bishop.

For those who may not be familiar with his work, BrianMeeks is a Caribbean poet and academic from Jamaica.  He is Professor of Africana Studies and Chair of the Africana Studies/Rites and Reason Theatre Department at Brown University, and while I was aware of his reputation this was the first time I heard him speak, and I was entranced.    Continue reading

Guyana: Diversity in Our Villages; Harmony in Our Culture – By Ken Corsbie

Ken Corsbie

Diversity in Our Villages; Harmony in Our Culture – By Ken Corsbie

On Mon, May 7, 2018 at 11:23 PM, Ken Corsbie <kencorsbie@gmail.com> wrote:

Hello folks, some of this may be of passing interest..
I wrote this perhaps 10 or 12 years ago. It was triggered by a symposium that my friend Henry Muttoo had organized in the Cayman Islands – the the poor tenement yards in the city as illustrated by Errol John’s signature play“Moon on a Rainbow Shawl”.
Wondering if it has any relevance or interest at this time.. …
The following article was in the Guyana Cultural Association NY – GuyFolkFest Magazine. It was carried by Guyanese Online in February 2011.

Ti-Jean and His Brothers – directed by Henry Muttoo -Trailer

Ti-Jean and His Brothers -Trailer

Based on a West Indian fable…  

Nobel Prize-winning author Derek Walcott explores the power of good versus evil, poor versus wealthy and the search for what defines humanness. This folk tale—told by the animals of the rainforest through dialogue, dance and song—tells the tale of a poor widowed mother, her three sons, and their bargain with the devil.

Directed by Macy’s Guest Artist Henry Muttoo, Artistic Director of the Cayman National Cultural Foundation. Continue reading

Ti-Jean and His Brothers – Theatre 2 USF Tampa Campus – Oct 24-Nov 3, 2013

3835-Ti_Jean

Based on a West Indian fable…

Nobel Prize winning author Derek Walcott explores the power of good versus evil, poor versus wealthy and the search for what defines human-ness. This folk tale, told by the animals of the rainforest through dialogue, dance and song, tells the tale of a poor widowed mother, her three sons, and their bargain with the devil.            

Directed by Macy’s Guest Artist Henry Muttoo, Artistic Director of the Cayman National Cultural Foundation.    Continue reading