Tag Archives: Harry Hergash

UG – University of Guyana: From Jagan’s Night School to Burnham’s Recognized University – By Freddie Kissoon

UG: A personal insult to Forbes Burnham which must be stopped

Oct 01, 2018  By Freddie Kissoon

I am not a fan of Forbes Burnham. As a Guyanese citizen engaged in social and political activism and a trained academic writing on my country’s history, I cannot bring myself to be an unqualified admirer of Burnham. He had vision, was a transformative thinker, and a fighter against White domination of Guyana.
But he had power instincts that took on ugly dimensions the consequences of which are still visible in this land.

As someone who writes on contemporary Guyana, I see nakedly foolish things said about Burnham that are simply not true and these things when repeated tells you more about the fools who echo them rather than the man they are writing about.      Continue reading

Hergash launches book on Indian-Guyanese Words, Phrases

Hergash launches book on
Indian-Guyanese Words, Phrases

Hergash

Harry Hergash  (left), presenting a copy of his publication to Dr. Frank Anthony, Guyana’s Minister of Culture, Youth and Sports in his office in Georgetown

In this year of the 175th Anniversary of the arrival of Indians in Guyana, Harry Hergash, president of the University of Guyana Guild of Graduates, Ontario, and a member of the Canada Guyana Forum, has just released in Guyana and in Toronto a publication titled “A Collection of Indian-Guyanese Words and Phrases and Their Meanings”.   Continue reading

A Collective Tribute to Randall Mohan Butisingh – 1912-2112

A Collective Tribute to Randall Mohan Butisingh – A Constant Teacher, a Constant Student

 Stabroek News – On December 31, 2012 – In The Diaspora | 

As we prepare to usher in a new year, we pay tribute to a remarkable individual, Randall Mohan Butisingh (RMB), who passed away on December 9th in Florida, just eight days after celebrating his 100th birthday. Thanks to Devanand Bhagwan, Cyril Bryan, Harry Hergash, daughter Joan Khan, Eusi Kwayana, Avin and Nalini Mohabir and Patanjali Ramlall, whose thoughts comprise this week’s diaspora column.

Excerpts from an obituary page created by his family give us a small measure of the man: “Randall was born on December 1, 1912 in British Guiana (now known as Guyana), and raised in Buxton, East Coast Demerara, where he received his primary education. In 1925, he qualified and was the first runner-up for the first Buxton Scholarship. Continue reading

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