Tag Archives: floods in Guyana

Dutch team recommends ways of tackling floods in Guyana

Dutch team recommends ways of tackling floods

  • Friday, 27 November 2015 – Demerara Waves
Minister of Public Infrastructure, David Patterson (at left) with members of the Dutch Risk Reduction team.

Minister of Public Infrastructure, David Patterson (at left) with members of the Dutch Risk Reduction team.

A Dutch Risk Reduction (DDR) team has recommended that Guyana continue to dredge its drainage system and ensure the water flows off the land properly and implement a high-tech system to improve water management.

The Ministry of Public Infrastructure says that is one of seven key recommendations made by the team as Guyana continues to explore long-lasting solutions to flooding especially after periods of intense rainfall even during short duration.   Continue reading

Georgetown flood – Commentary

Georgetown flood – Commentary

By Stabroek News – March 4, 2012 – Editorial |  Comments

As Georgetowners sloshed around in the water last Wednesday, they must have wondered whether it might be worth investing in a wooden boat and paddles, rather than a Toyota or a Hyundai, given that flooding is becoming such a regular feature of existence. With the possible exception of Dhaka in Bangladesh, there can be no other capital city in the world whose thoroughfares and bottom houses disappear below the water level with such expedition after merely a day’s rain. It is true that as Mayor Green reported, 5.5 inches of rain fell in a 24-hour period, but then we have been experiencing the effects of La Niña, a phenomenon to which this country is hardly a stranger.

After the catastrophe of 2005, one might have thought that the authorities would have committed themselves to doing the things which would keep the city – which after all is the centre of government and commerce – largely high and dry, but apparently not. Of course, no one is suggesting that we can eliminate flooding altogether; however, its frequency could surely be reduced as could the severity of its impact. Continue reading

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