Tag Archives: E.R. Burrowes

Hope: Guyana’s history and the names of some “Great Guyanese”

 By Geoff Burrowes

When I was growing up I knew a mild mannered boy named Malcolm Rodrigues. His nickname was “Milky”. I later heard that he had become a Jesuit priest.

When many of us, decided that life under the heel of the Forbes Burnham regime was not supportable and emigrated to other countries to enjoy their freedoms, Malcolm continued to minister in Guyana. I recently read an article written by him about the martyrdom of Father Darke and realized that Malcolm had grown into a courageous priest who had stood up against the excesses of the politicians of the time. I guess that his Jesuit training and expectations were partially responsible for that growth.          Continue reading

Guyana: Memories of Independence – By Alissa Trotz

Memories of Independence

By Alissa Trotz On May 26, 2016  – In The Diaspora

Alissa Trotz teaches at the University of Toronto and is the editor of the In the Diaspora column

20131028diasporaHow many times have we seen the coat of arms without really understanding what it stands for? Or without knowing how it came to be? Speaking with Stanley Greaves this week, one learns that in fact there was a competition for the flag and coat of arms. As Greaves remembers it “I entered the competition, and you had any number of artists, so that what you are seeing is a composite where elements were taken from different artists and put together. My contribution was the two jaguars holding up the shield, but without the pick and the plant (representing mining and rice). Those were added.    Continue reading

A Conversation With Guyanese artist Dudley Charles

A Conversation With Dudley Charles

by Marcia G. Yerman – http://www.huffingtonpost.com/

Dudley Charles

Dudley Charles

Most artists talk about their personal history with a definitive sense of knowing that they were destined to be an artist.

Not Dudley Charles.

A soft-spoken man with a melodic cadence to his voice, Charles shared with me his story of growing up in Plaisance, Guyana, and the path that placed him on the road to art.

Charles talked about his early years in elementary school, when he was about 10-years-old. He was not a top athlete and, despite his desire to play cricket with his peers, was not sought out to be on their teams. Charles had to fill his school time with another activity, and the only choice available was arts and crafts.

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