Tag Archives: Dr. Martin Luther King

The Power of One! – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Can one person really make a difference?

Can an individual change the world by doing good? We hear the wonderful words of inspiration from some of the leading thinkers of our time. Many believe they can lift mountains if they put their minds to it. It is not rocket science to think that one person can change the world if that person applies him or herself to the task ahead.

Making a difference is about creating changes that will benefit others. There will be challenges but one should hold a firm course and not be distracted. Mahatma Gandhi has said that we must be the change that we want to see. The anthropologist Margaret Mead has stated that, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful and committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”     Continue reading

The Unsung Black Women of America – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

The Unsung Black Women of America – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Ella Baker says, “You didn’t see me on television; you didn’t see news stories about me, The kind of role I play was to pick up pieces or put together pieces out of which I hoped organization  might come.’

While her most illustrious colleagues were in limelight Baker had fashioned a well-oiled machine as part of the civil rights movement. Baker was the granddaughter of a slave. Her grandmother was whipped for refusing to marry a man that was chosen for her by the slave owner.

Baker’s sense for social justice was sharpened by the stories of her grand-mother about the perils of slavery. She realized that in order to break the chains of dependence she would have to take education seriously.  Continue reading

Hate and the American Dilemma – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Hate and the American Dilemma

By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

“In church! My, God, we’re not even safe in church,” said a worshipper.

These words of anguish were said in 1963 in Birmingham, Alabama and they could apply to Charleston, South Carolina in 2015. The black churches have provided warmth, sustenance and comfort to their members.
But their sacred spaces have also been violated by hate, abuse and violence. The fact is that African-Americans and other minorities cannot be guaranteed safety in their houses of worship.

On Sunday September 15, 1963 four young girls died when a bomb tore down the basement of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Later that day two black teenagers were shot dead in questionable circumstances. The cover-up by the authorities, including the FBI, ensured that it took years before the accused could be brought to justice.  Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: