Tag Archives: Donald Locke

Art: LIMINAL SPACE – Experiences specific to the Guyanese Diaspora

LIMINAL SPACE

June 17, 2017 to October 26, 2017

Liminal Space speaks to the broader emergence of the Caribbean diaspora in global metropolises. While these artists narrate experiences specific to the Guyanese diaspora, they simultaneously unpack the act of migration as a constant site of engagement and what it means to be an immigrant in our 21st century world.

Featured Artists: Kwesi Abbensetts, Damali Abrams, Khadija Benn, Victor Davson, Stanley Greaves, Carl Hazlewood, Dominque Hunter, Michael Lam, Donald Locke, Andrew Lyght, Suchitra Mattai, Christie Neptune, Mason Richards, Karran Sahadeo, Keisha Scarville, Arlington Weithers.       Continue reading

A Conversation With Guyanese artist Dudley Charles

A Conversation With Dudley Charles

by Marcia G. Yerman – http://www.huffingtonpost.com/

Dudley Charles

Dudley Charles

Most artists talk about their personal history with a definitive sense of knowing that they were destined to be an artist.

Not Dudley Charles.

A soft-spoken man with a melodic cadence to his voice, Charles shared with me his story of growing up in Plaisance, Guyana, and the path that placed him on the road to art.

Charles talked about his early years in elementary school, when he was about 10-years-old. He was not a top athlete and, despite his desire to play cricket with his peers, was not sought out to be on their teams. Charles had to fill his school time with another activity, and the only choice available was arts and crafts.

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New York City Exhibit Features Artists of Guyanese Heritage

New York City Exhibit Features Artists of Guyanese Heritage

2013-02-09-VictorDavsonMARK.jpgPosted: 02/11/2013 4:06 pm – Huntington Post

In a bright, open space on Second Street and Avenue B in Manhattan, an exhibition featuring 12 artists of Guyanese descent is on view at the Wilmer Jennings Gallery.

Guyana is a country that is approximately the same size as the state of Idaho. Although it is situated on the northern coast of South America, it is considered part of the “Anglo-Caribbean.” The Dutch, French and English all planted their imperial flags on the terrain. With the abolishment of slavery in 1834, an influx of workers from East India came to the country. Today, 50 percent of the population is descended from East Indians and 36 percent is of African descendent.

At the opening, I was able to speak with several of the artists as well as the show’s curator, Carl E. Hazlewood. His stated goal was to inform a larger audience about the achievements of artists of Guyanese ancestry.    Continue reading

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