Tag Archives: Dominican Republic

HAITI — Many culprits are to blame for Haiti’s long history of suffering – by Mohamed Hamaludin

By MOHAMED HAMALUDIN

Heartbreaking news coming out of Haiti paints a picture of a nation engulfed by gang violence “which has placed the capital in a state of siege,” the United Nations said in early May, Agence France-Presse (AFP) reported. The horror includes “beheadings, chopping and burning of bodies and the killing of minors accused of being informants for a rival gang.” Children as young as 10 are subjected to sexual violence, including gang rape. Doctors Without Borders closed its 15-year-old hospital.

The gangs “operate like de facto governments, with their own courts, ‘police stations and residential fees for everything from electricity to school permits,” The New York Times reported. The 11,000-member National Police is much too small for a country of 11 million; experts say at least 30,000 officers are needed.

The seeds of this tragedy were, however, planted long ago and there are much more significant culprits to blame than just thugs with guns and no regard for life. France and the United States top the list, along with at least two rapacious foreign banks, sundry despots, corrupt officials and catastrophic natural disasters.              Continue reading

CARICOM | Caught in a perfect economic storm – By David Jessop

Published: Sunday | March 20, 2022 – Jamaica Gleaner

Caricom heads of government meeting in Belize could not have been clearer about the ‘perfect storm’ that is about to strike the Caribbean.

Speaking at a post-summit press conference, John Briceño and Mia Mottley, the prime ministers of Belize and Barbados, respectively, both stressed the importance of a unified response to the multiplicity of global economic challenges facing the region. The emphasis now, they suggested, must be on actions that result in self-reliance and resilience.

In San Pedro, Caricom heads agreed that the region urgently needed to implement measures intended to create self-sufficiency in food production and energy, deliver an effective and viable Caricom Single Market and Economy, and more aggressively seek out the funding required to drive regional economic recovery.          Continue reading

HAITI: How Toussaint Louverture Rose from Slavery to Lead the Haitian Revolution

How did Toussaint Louverture, born into bondage in the French colony of Saint-Domingue (present-day Haiti) and enslaved for more than half his life, come to lead the most successful slave revolt in history—and help precipitate the downfall of European colonialism in the western hemisphere?

Saint-Domingue in the late 18th century thrived as the wealthiest colony in the Americas. Its sugar, coffee, indigo and cotton plantations minted money, fueled by a vast enslaved labor force. A French colony since 1697, it occupied the western half of the Caribbean island of Hispaniola, while the Spanish had colonized the eastern side, called Santo Domingo (now the Dominican Republic).        Continue reading

Caribbean 2020: Voters Tough Choices in Elections in Six Countries

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VOTERS TOUGH CHOICES

Six key Caribbean Community nations will hold general elections this year and in at least three of them, the economy and racial tensions will be key campaign issues. Also in the same three — Guyana, Suriname and Trinidad — the incumbents face tough reelection battles from upstart opposition parties or groups. Voting along ethnic lines has traditionally been a key factor in these three and could determine outcomes.

Guyana which just weeks ago became one of the world’s newest crude oil exporters, will most likely go to the polls first among the seven with the March 2 date set by incumbent President David Granger since last year. Parliament has already been dissolved.          Continue reading

The View from Europe: China’s rapidly advancing Caribbean role – by David Jessop

The View from Europe: China’s rapidly advancing Caribbean role

David Jessop

For some years now, China has sought to deepen its relations with the countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. It has done so as a part of a long-term geo-political strategy that is accompanying its rise to super power status.

Its objective in every nation in South and Central America and the Caribbean is to support development through investment and trade, and then over time to enlarge its economic, political and security role.   Continue reading

The View from Europe: Oil, the environment and the Caribbean – By David Jessop

Earlier this month Exxon announced that that it had made a major new oil find off Guyana. It was, it said, the largest since it began exploration there in 2015. The company’s statement followed one last June advising of a ‘world-class discovery’ on another well, and before that, announcements about four other commercially exploitable finds.

What this and Exxon’s recent request to the Guyanese government for permission to drill up to 40 new wells after 2022 suggests, is that the country is about to become a major oil producer in the Western Hemisphere.      Continue reading

Caribbean: The media and the linguistic divide – By David Jessop

Caribbean: The media and the linguistic divide

Published on September 3, 2016  – By David Jessop

David Jessop

David Jessop

In the middle of last month Danilo Medina was sworn in as president of the Dominican Republic for a second term. His inauguration was attended by many senior figures from the Americas including the prime minister of Antigua, Gaston Browne, who earlier the same month, quite separately, had met with him and his then foreign minister.

Some days later the Dominican Republic’s new foreign minister, Miguel Vargas, said in one of his first public statements, that he believed that his country needed to exert greater influence on regional and international organisations. Mr Vargas then went on to meet on August 30 in Port-au-Prince, Haiti’s interim president, Jocelerme Privert, and others. There they agreed to revive the two nation’s Joint Bilateral Commission to try to resolve issues relating to cross border trade, investment and migration.     Continue reading

The 10 Most Corrupt Nations In the Americas

The 10 Most Corrupt Nations In the Americas

Venezuela is dubbed the most corrupt nation in the Americas. Guyana is fifth.

News Americas, NEW YORK, NY, Fri. Dec. 18, 2015: On the heels of the International Anti-Corruption Day and as the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) urged governments to jointly tackle the issue of corruption by changing their attitudes towards the problem, News Americas Now decided to look at some of the most corrupt countries in the Americas – both the Caribbean and Latin America.

Here are the Top 10 as complied by News Americas Now based on the public perception of corruption among public and private sector officials, with 1 being the most corrupt according to data compiled from the latest Transparency International Corruption Index and the Heritage Foundations’ 2015 Index of Economic Freedom.  Continue reading

Rural Caribbean Tourism: A New Opportunity? | Caribbean and Latin America News

Rural Caribbean Tourism: A New Opportunity? | Caribbean and Latin America News

Jarabacoa-in-La-Vega-DR

Jarabacoa in La Vega province in the DR.

By David Jessop

News Americas, LONDON, England, Fri. Nov. 6, 2015: One of my abiding memories of travelling in the Dominican Republic is of staying in a remote and beautiful mountainous area above Jarabacoa in La Vega province.

For those who have never had the good fortune to visit the country’s central range of mountains, these are largely lush and tropical, but their high elevation — 525m and more above sea level — means that they have warm days and cool nights for most of the year.

What made this special for me was that I, a visitor, stayed in a house owned by friends that was located in and above a rural community. It was magical.     Continue reading

Freer US Travel to Cuba poses a Challenge – By David Jessop

Freer US Travel to Cuba poses a Challenge

Published on Aug 27 2015 – By David Jessop

cuba

Havana – Cuba

News Americas, LONDON, England, Fri. Aug. 28, 2015: According to the North American trade publication, Travel Weekly, US tourism to Cuba is now growing at such pace that the country is experiencing a shortage of both highly trained Cuban professional guides and non-Cuban certified tour directors to accompany the tours that US Treasury regulations require almost all US visitors to take.

It is just one indication of a situation that as this year goes on may change, if as seems likely the US Administration allows its citizens to travel to Cuba on an individual basis.  Continue reading

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