Tag Archives: Diaspora

OIL: Change in Guyana and the Role of Diaspora Hometown Associations – By Lear Matthews

We Got Oil! Realizing Change in Guyana and the Role of Diaspora Hometown Associations

Lear Matthews

By Lear Matthews

The nation of Guyana has been in the news lately for good reasons. Stained  by the horrific tragedy of Jonestown in the late 1980’s and recently maligned by a New York  Times writer, according to Exxon-Mobil, oil discovery off Guyana’s northern coast will top 4 billion barrels, becoming a leading oil producing nation in the region. However, owing to the large number of Guyanese who emigrate, much of the nation’s skills and expertise, including those that could contribute significantly to the oil industry’s success, reportedly reside in the Diaspora. There has not been an effective strategy to engage expatriates – perhaps until now.

Despite the almost euphoric optimism expressed by Guyanese at home and abroad there are challenges only marginally discussed, but are beginning to emerge. One observer noted, “with major oil set to flow as soon as 2020, authorities are bracing both for the shock of wealth and its attendant woes”. This article focuses on the potential role of Hometown Associations (HTA) in helping to understand the socio-cultural ramifications, identifying the risks and harnessing required skills, attitude and cultural adaptation needed to ensure reaping the benefits of this unprecedented, historic natural resource discovery.    Continue reading

Banks, The Caribbean Diaspora And Remittances – By David Jessop

Banks, The Caribbean Diaspora And Remittances

David Jessop

David Jessop

Published on Jan 11 2016 – By David Jessop

News Americas, LONDON, England, Tues. Jan. 12, 2015: Imagine this! You, a partner or family member is working overseas. You have been sending money home to support an aging relative or to make a regular payment on a mortgage.

You go to the Caribbean money transfer business that you have always used, only to be told your money can no longer accepted because there is no intermediary bank in Europe or the US willing to work with it despite its absolute reliability and positive track record.    Continue reading

DIASPORA TIMES NEWSLETTER – OCTOBER 2015

Download:  DIASPORA TIMES OCTOBER-Final for circulation

Diaspora TimesContent:   PAGE 3: Not a blade o’ grass     PAGE 4-5: Extracts from President Granger’s address to the UN      PAGE 6-8: Venezuela File      PAGE 9: Chronicle calls out PPP     PAGE 10-11: Amerindians owned it      PAGE 12: Development & the Diaspora      PAGE 13: The President, Prime Minister, Vice Presidents & Ministers       PAGE 14: How much money does a politician need?       PAGE 15: Government’s turn to trust the people.       PAGE 16-17: Do we know where our children are?       PAGE 18-19: How Diaspora improves children’s education.      PAGE 20: If it was wrong then, it is wrong now.      PAGE 21-22: New hope for unity …      PAGE 23: A goobie is not a calabash      PAGE 24-25: Remittances      PAGE 26: Guyana’s transformational leadership      PAGE 27: What our readers write.      PAGE 28: Guyana news summary.  Continue reading

Tartan: Its Journey Through the African Diaspora’

CIAD presents ‘Tartan: Its Journey Through the African Diaspora’

By ARC Magazine Sunday, August 3rd, 2014

 The Costume Institute of the African Diaspora (CIAD) presents its first major project titled ‘Tartan: Its Journey through the African Diaspora’, which tells the story of how tartan travelled around the world and through its influence led to aspects of material culture being developed  in certain parts of Africa and the Diaspora. The project looks at how these cultures adapted, adopted or absorbed this influence to bring significance to fabrics such as madras cloth. Madras cloth was created in India and then sold to people in the Caribbean, the fabric has been used in the development of many islands national dress.

RODNEY COI, Opening a “Can of Worms” for the PNC

FROM THE DIASPORA … RODNEY COI, OPENING A “CAN OF WORMS” FOR THE PNC

MAY 4, 2014 | BY  | By: RALPH SEERAM

The PNC is worried, very worried, and has every right to be worried about disclosures emanating from the Rodney Commission of Inquiry; not that it’s anything new to older folks in Guyana and those in the Diaspora like myself.  They have for good and selfish reasons to worry about what more than half the voting population in Guyana is now learning about a period of Guyana’s history that they never experienced.

Today you read about how the PPP is undemocratic; how it’s a dictatorship, and to be honest some of the PPP behaviour brought this on. However young Guyanese are now learning what a true dictatorship was under the PNC, what a real police state Guyana was under PNC rule.  Continue reading

Life is what happens when you least expect it – Ron Cheong

Life is what happens when you least expect it

Life1– Ron Cheong

Remarking on the phenomenon that  Guyanese can now be found around the world, including some of the most unlikely places, Guyana Foreign Minister Carolyn Rodrigues-Birkett recently told the story of a Guyanese diplomat on business in Iceland to a Diaspora gathering in Toronto.

The set up for the story is that diplomatic life can sometimes feel somewhat like living in a glass bowl.  The anonymity that we can enjoy more or less at will is less available to those in that line of occupation.  Welcoming the opportunity to let down his hair at the end of the day in Iceland, he hailed a taxi and got in.  At which time the driver turned around and said, “Wha happenin bro.”

Read more  ..[Life is what happens – Ron Cheong]

GCA – JUNE 2012 Newsletter – Happy Father’s Day!

Happy Father’s Day!  from the:

Guyana Cultural Association of New York, Inc.

Download the June 2012 Newsletter  –   GCA – JUNE 2012 NEWSLETTER

Masquerade Lives! 2012 Folk Festival Theme

Masquerade Lives is the theme for the eleventh year of Guyana Cultural Association of New York, Inc. Throughout this issue you will read about the GCA events that will explore and define the focus for 2012.
In addition, this edition is a celebration of lives well lived. Therefore, as you experience through words and pictures the joys, struggles and tenacity that typify the culture of the people of Guyana throughout the , do reflect on the past, enjoy the present and move into the future.
This issue is all about life.     Enjoy!

IN THIS ISSUE Continue reading

What are the direct benefits of independence for Guyanese? – letter

What are the direct benefits of independence for Guyanese?

Stabroek staff On May 27, 2012  Letters | Comments

Dear Editor,

Given what has played out in local politics after the British politicos left Guyana in May 1966, I can’t really think of anything significant which we can celebrate, thus rendering any thought of a 46th anniversary celebration one more of symbolism than of substance.

It may be a paradox that exists in many other ex-colonies that attained political independence, but it would be interesting to learn what the latest studies are showing the pre and post-independence thoughts of people, as well as comparative analyses of socioeconomic and political conditions before and after independence in ex-colonies, from sub-Saharan Africa to Central Asia to Latin and South America and the Caribbean.

For example, neighbouring Barbados (166 sq miles and 288,000 people), which attained independence on November 30, 1966, from Britain (six months after Guyana), is exemplary when it comes to political stability and social and economic progress. In 2010, it ranked first among 193 countries in political liberties and civil liberties. Transparency International’s Corruption Perception Index 2011 ranks Barbados as 2nd in the Americas and 16th among 183 countries.

The Index of Economic Freedom 2011 ranks Barbados as the 4th freest economy in the Americas and the 37th in the world, while the World Economic Forum’s Global Competitiveness Report 2011-2012 says Barbados is the 3rd most stable banking system in the Western Hemisphere. Should I impress you with more astonishing facts about tiny Barbados just to make the point?  Continue reading

From the Diaspora…Is Jagdeo hurting the PPP?

From the Diaspora…Is Jagdeo hurting the PPP?

NOVEMBER 6, 2011 | BY  | FILED UNDER NEWS

By Ralph Seeram

I guess nobody wants to say it, at least from the PPP camp, but Bharrat needs to step back and Donald will have to step up. The President is not helping; in fact I think he is turning off the swing voters. Yes I am going to say it Jagdeo is hurting the PPP campaign. I was very serious last week when I suggested the President tone it down. He needs to stop the “cussing” and “byuseing” and put emphasis on the PPP track record. I am sure he can find enough positives of his achievements to last the rest of the campaign.

Sure you’re supposed to ridicule and disparage your opponents in an election campaign; that is what election is all about, but there must be a strategy to it, if Bharrat has a strategy in his rhetoric, with all due respects to him, I think he is hurting Donald. I take it personal when he calls the media” vultures and carrion crows” In an election you need the media; you should make the media your best friend.    more

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