Tag Archives: Cuba

Washington Owes The Region An Explanation – By David Jessop

 Washington Owes The Region An Explanation

| March 10, 2019 | By David Jessop 

US National Security Adviser John Bolton

From Iraq, through Libya to Syria, the approach to regime change by the United States and its allies has been to support the removal of a disliked government with little serious thought as to the broader consequences.

Absent in these and other lower intensity conflicts has been any informed long-term thinking or planning about the ensuing instability, the multiple damaging effects on neighbours, or the additional cost in human suffering an intervention causes.      Continue reading

The View from Europe: Oil, the environment and the Caribbean – By David Jessop

Earlier this month Exxon announced that that it had made a major new oil find off Guyana. It was, it said, the largest since it began exploration there in 2015. The company’s statement followed one last June advising of a ‘world-class discovery’ on another well, and before that, announcements about four other commercially exploitable finds.

What this and Exxon’s recent request to the Guyanese government for permission to drill up to 40 new wells after 2022 suggests, is that the country is about to become a major oil producer in the Western Hemisphere.      Continue reading

Category 4 Hurricane Matthew Churns Toward Jamaica

matthew

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Category 4 Hurricane Matthew Churns Toward Jamaica

KINGSTON, Jamaica, Oct 1 2016 Hurricane Matthew weakened as it churned across the Caribbean — threatening Jamaica, Cuba, Haiti and the Bahamas.
Matthew strengthened into a Category 5 late Friday, becoming the strongest hurricane in the Atlantic Ocean since Felix in 2007, the National Weather Service said.

However, by early Saturday, it had downgraded to a Category 4 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 155 mph (250 km/h).     Continue reading

Top Caribbean & Latin American Countries Where Women Have The Most Power

Top Caribbean & Latin American Countries Where Women Have The Most Power

Nicaragua-Minister-of-Health-Sonia-Castro-Gonzalez

Photo: Nicaragua’s Minister of Health Sonia Castro Gonzalez is one of 47 percent of senior government officials in the cabinet who are women.

News Americas, NEW YORK, NY, Weds. Dec. 16, 2015: The World Economic Forum has released its annual Global Gender Gap index which includes the top Caribbean and Latin American countries where women have most power. Here are the top 5 globally and in the Americas: Continue reading

Guantanamera – By Adrian Sanchez – includes music videos

Adrian Sanchez is one of the followers of Guyanese Online

Hoxton Spanish Tutor Info

A song which we all should know. Its name alone resonates deep within me and in perfect time with my heartbeat. Guantanamera. I love it when a song, its rhythms and beat, affect me with such physicality. Guantanamera is one such song. Imagine my excitement when I recently heard a new version of this Latin American musical gem. For anyone who has not heard “Guantanamera” and would like to listen: click here and please tell me what you think of it.

Guantanamera

This  version of Guantanamera is a vast collaboration of no less than 75 Cuban recording artists. It was produced by Playing for Change [1]. They recorded and produced this track with Jackson Browne, who stated that traveling with Playing for Change across Cuba was one of the most rewarding and inspiring musical experiences of his life.

As with the most popular versions of this song, this latest recording, is based…

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Coming to Terms With the American Empire – commentary

Coming to Terms With the American Empire

Geopolitical WeeklyGeopolitical Weekly  – April 14, 2015 | 07:54 GMT  –By George Friedman

“Empire” is a dirty word. Considering the behavior of many empires, that is not unreasonable. But empire is also simply a description of a condition, many times unplanned and rarely intended. It is a condition that arises from a massive imbalance of power. Indeed, the empires created on purpose, such as Napoleonic France and Nazi Germany, have rarely lasted. Most empires do not plan to become one. They become one and then realize what they are. Sometimes they do not realize what they are for a long time, and that failure to see reality can have massive consequences.

World War II and the Birth of an Empire

The United States became an empire in 1945. It is true that in the Spanish-American War, the United States intentionally took control of the Philippines and Cuba. It is also true that it began thinking of itself as an empire, but it really was not. Cuba and the Philippines were the fantasy of empire, and this illusion dissolved during World War I, the subsequent period of isolationism and the Great Depression.   Continue reading

BOOK: RACING WITH THE RAIN – Ken Puddicombe

BOOK: RACING WITH THE RAIN – Ken Puddicombe

racing in the rain

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CIA INTERVENTION IN THE INTERNAL POLITICS OF BRITISH GUIANA DURING THE EARLY 1960’S.

Documents alleging the CIA, the U.S., and British Governments had a hand in changing the elected government prior to British Guiana’s independence in 1966 are essential to the theme of the novel RACING WITH THE RAIN.

Author Ken Puddicombe has written a novel using the CIA intervention to flush out the plot and lend credibility to the conflict his characters experienced during the turbulent cold war era.

Racing With The Rain: a phenomenon witnessed in the tropics. A fast moving rain cloud in an otherwise clear sky triggers a sudden downpour and people run helter-skelter for cover. Is it possible to outrun the rain? Can one ever really escape the past and avoid the inevitable?

Puddicombe’s novel spans three decades, shifting locations between pre and post independent Guyana, Cuba after the revolution, and Canada in the 1970’s.

Continue reading

Ports, the Panama Canal and the Future

Ports, Panama and the Future

Panama Canal

In 2015, ships will be transiting an enlarged Panama Canal.

By David Jessop

News Americas, LONDON, England, Mon. Feb. 24, 2014:

In the last few years, almost every significant Caribbean country has announced that they are upgrading their port facilities and preparing to compete to attract the larger Post-Panamax vessels that from some time in 2015 will be transiting an enlarged Panama Canal.

Such is the opportunity, given the Caribbean’s strategic location at the cross roads of north-south and east-west trade, and its numerous existing or new locations for deepwater ports, that Jamaica, Martinique, Cuba, Trinidad, the Bahamas and the Dominican Republic have all made clear that with the support of one or another foreign investor, port development will become critical to future growth. However, what is still far from certain is whether there is enough opportunity for all of the existing or proposed super ports, hubs, and manufacturing and trans-shipment zones to succeed.   Continue reading

The EU’s Changing policy towards Cuba – by David Jessop

The European Union’s Changing policy towards Cuba – A Wake-up Call

Cuba

By David Jessop

News Americas, LONDON, England, Thurs. Jan. 30, 2014: The President of the European Commission (EC), José Manuel Barroso, has confirmed that Europe is presently in the process of debating a significant change in its policy towards Cuba.

Speaking recently to journalists in Madrid, Mr. Barroso, who is a former Portuguese Prime Minister, said that the European Union (EU) is discussing the possibility of modifications to its Cuba policy, and that this will require the blessing of all of Europe’s 28 member countries. He also reaffirmed the EU’s long-standing wish for there to be change in Cuba in relation to human rights, and its continuing desire to see the adoption of western democratic norms.  Continue reading

The Panama Canal And The Caribbean – by David Jessop

The Panama Canal And The Caribbean – By David Jessop

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The widened Panama Canal – in 2014 – will affect the Caribbean

News Americas, LONDON, England, Weds. April 4, 2012:   In two years time, significantly larger ships will be able to pass via an enlarged Panama Canal between the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. Together with other infrastructural developments this is leading some Caribbean governments to hope that with the support of investors from outside the region, Panama’s development as a hub for the hemisphere could significantly improve the region’s economic prospects.

Although this idea needs to be treated with a degree of caution, not least because many Caribbean nations remain heavily indebted and remain at risk from any significant increase in energy and food prices, the Canal’s widening does suggest new opportunity for the region when taken together with other developments and the broadening interest being shown by large international investors.      Continue reading