Tag Archives: Coronavirus

UK: End mass jabs and live with Covid- says ex-head of vaccine taskforce

Dr. Clive Dix says we should treat the virus like flu

With health chiefs and senior Tories also lobbying for a post-pandemic plan for a straining NHS, Dr Clive Dix called for a major rethink of the UK’s Covid strategy, in effect reversing the approach of the past two years and returning to a “new normality”.

“We need to analyse whether we use the current booster campaign to ensure the vulnerable are protected, if this is seen to be necessary,” he said. “Mass population-based vaccination in the UK should now end.”            Continue reading

GUYANA: VACCINE POLITICS – Shouting ‘Fire’ In A Crowded Cinema – by Ralph Ramkarran 

–  – Conversation Tree Blog
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News reports on June 17 reveal that 224,853 persons in Guyana, representing 46.2 percent of the targeted adult population had taken the COVID 19 vaccine. Of these 94,243 persons or 19.4 percent have taken the second dose. Region 10 with 14 percent lags far behind the other regions. In all except Region 8, which is at 29.6 percent, more that 40 percent have been vaccinated with at least one dose. Region 6 is at 54 percent and Region 1 is at 55.9 percent.  (See REGIONS MAP below)

Notwithstanding the excellent work that is being done to vaccinate as many people as possible, there are wide reports of vaccination hesitancy among the population. Responsible employers are complaining about significant resistance to the taking of vaccines by staff, which is very concerning. The above figures, particularly for Region 10 should be a cause for serious concern. It is such that the Government has begun house-to-house vaccination in that Region.    Continue reading

BUSINESS: The office is dead! Long live the office in a post-pandemic world – Opinion

By The Conversation – July 24, 2000

Introduction: The future of the office has become an open question after the coronavirus lockdown forced tens of millions of Americans to work from home. Will office workers flock back to their cubicles and water coolers when the pandemic ends? Or will employees want to hold on to their newfound freedom and flexibility, while employers eye the lower costs of the lack of a physical footprint?

At least a few companies have already answered this question: Twitter, for example, says most of its employees can continue working from home forever, making the office merely a place to meet clients. We asked three scholars to weigh in on the future of the office.        Continue reading

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