Tag Archives: Clem Seecharan

BOOK: A Proud Product of Guyana’s Bitter-Sweet Sugar – by Nowrang Persaud (Author)

A Proud Product of Guyana’s Bitter-Sweet Sugar  – by Nowrang Persaud (Author)Paperback – July 27, 2018 

  • A Review of Nowrang Persaud’s autobiography “A Proud Product of Guyana’s Bitter-Sweet Sugar” by Harry Hergash
  • ORDER FROM AMAZON < click here

Nowrang Persaud was born in 1937 at Number 47 Village, Corentyne Berbice, Guyana (then British Guiana). A year earlier, an eighteen year-old named Cheddi Jagan, from a nearby sugar plantation, left the colony to pursue studies in dentistry in the United States of America (USA). By the time Jagan returned to Guyana in late 1943, Nowrang and his siblings were living with their mother, step-father, and several step siblings in a one-bedroom logie at Blairmont Estate.

About living in a logie, Nowrang writes “In common with all other sugar estates, living conditions in the Blairmont Estate in which I grew up as a boy were dangerously unhealthy, unkempt and atrocious.        Continue reading

Guyana Speaks: Indo-Guyanese Pioneers – London UK – April 29, 2018

Download Flyer:   https://guyanaassociations.files.wordpress.com/2018/04/gs-flyer-29-april.pdf

In celebration of the forthcoming, Indian Arrival Day (5thMay) and the on-going centenary of the abolition of Indenture in the British Empire (2017-2020) Guyana SPEAKS is hosting an event on Sunday, 29thApril (2-5pm) entitled ‘Indo-Guyanese Pioneers’.       Continue reading

The El Dorado Complex in the Shaping of Indo-Guyanese – Clem Seecharan

           THE 2014 REPUBLIC OF GUYANA DISTINGUISHED                    LECTURE     

                The El Dorado Complex in the Shaping of Indo-Guyanese: A                                                       Revisionist Perspective

                                          by  CLEM SEECHARAN

Emeritus Professor of History,  London Metropolitan University

In February 1594 Sir Robert Dudley made inquiries about the rumoured Empire of Guiana…He sent a small boat to investigate and its crew returned, after great hardships, to say that the natives had told them of goldmines so rich that the people of the country powdered themselves with gold-dust.   Michael Swan (1957)

Guyana has alwaysbeen a land of fantasy. It was the land of El Dorado….  V.S. Naipaul (1991)     

 Guyana, for all its independence and its symbols of nationhood, has never been a closely-knit society…the ethnic divide made this almost impossible. There is hatred between the various ethnic groups with the darkest of the races being reserved for the greatest hatred.      Leader, Kaieteur News, 6 February 2014   Continue reading

Whose freedom at midnight? – By Clem Seecharan

Whose freedom at midnight?

 Stabroek News – September 3, 2008 In Guyana Review |

Machinations towards Guyana’s Independence, May 1966

By Clem Seecharan  –Professor of Caribbean History and Head of Caribbean Studies, London Metropolitan University (forthcoming in Round Table October 2008)

Guyana (formerly British Guiana), the only British colony on the mainland of South America, became independent at midnight on 26 May 1966. But whose freedom was it? For nearly 20 years the Marxist leader of the People’s Progressive Party (PPP), Cheddi Jagan (1918-97), of Indian extraction, buoyed by the independence of India and obsessed with the dominance of the British company, Booker, in the colony’s plantation economy, had championed Guyana’s ‘struggle’ for independence. Yet, on the big night it was the African leader of the People’s National Congress (PNC), L.F.S. Burnham (1923-85), who was the recipient of the prize.

His politics, though left-wing, was characterised by a cultivated pragmatism, strategic ambiguity ─ the facility to ‘tack and turn as advantage seems to dictate…his whole political approach is opportunistic’, as a British politician had assessed him in 1954.i With the aid of the Portuguese and Coloured (mixed race) political party, the United Force (UF), led by a Portuguese businessman, Peter D’Aguiar, a rabid anti-communist, in conjunction with the decisive intervention of President Kennedy himself and the CIA, in 1962-3, the PNC resorted to violence to make British Guiana ungovernable. The latter proved effective: it delayed independence, while Anglo-American collusion brought a Burnham-D’Aguiar coalition to power in December 1964 and independence in May 1966. Cheddi Jagan was a virtual spectator to the celebrations of the country’s ‘freedom’.              Continue reading

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