Tag Archives: Civil Rights Movement

The Unsung Black Women of America – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

The Unsung Black Women of America – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Ella Baker says, “You didn’t see me on television; you didn’t see news stories about me, The kind of role I play was to pick up pieces or put together pieces out of which I hoped organization  might come.’

While her most illustrious colleagues were in limelight Baker had fashioned a well-oiled machine as part of the civil rights movement. Baker was the granddaughter of a slave. Her grandmother was whipped for refusing to marry a man that was chosen for her by the slave owner.

Baker’s sense for social justice was sharpened by the stories of her grand-mother about the perils of slavery. She realized that in order to break the chains of dependence she would have to take education seriously.  Continue reading

The Freedom Riders of 1961- By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

The Freedom Riders of 1961- By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

The next time you sit in a train or ride the buses in America, or even enjoy a walk in the park you should think of a group of brave persons called the Freedom Riders.

Their acts helped to hasten the Civil Rights movement in the United States and to make it possible for all races to sit and eat together and to use public transportation without discrimination.

The Freedom Riders movement had its genesis in 1947. It  was in that year that the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) conducted a Journey of Reconciliation, the purpose of which was to direct attention to racial segregation in
public transportation.  Continue reading

The Celebration of Dorothy I. Height – by Lawrence O’Donnell

The Celebration of Dorothy I. Height – by Lawrence O’Donnell

Dorothy Height

Dorothy Height

Published on Mar 26, 2014: The Celebration of Dorothy I. Height, one of the most respected and powerful women of the 20th Century. March 24th was her 102nd Birthday

More info from Wikipedia:

Dorothy Irene Height (March 24, 1912 – April 20, 2010)[1] was an Americanadministratoreducator, and a civil rights and women’s rights activist specifically focused on the issues of African-American women, including unemployment, illiteracy, and voter awareness.[2] She was the president of the National Council of Negro Women for forty years and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1994 and the Congressional Gold Medal in 2004.[1] 

Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: