Tag Archives: Amazon

Data and medicine … A revolution in health care is coming – The Economist

Data and medicine … A revolution in health care is coming

Welcome to Doctor You

NO WONDER they are called “patients”. When people enter the health-care systems of rich countries today, they know what they will get: prodding doctors, endless tests, baffling jargon, rising costs and, above all, long waits. Some stoicism will always be needed, because health care is complex and diligence matters. But frustration is boiling over.

This week three of the biggest names in American business—Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and JPMorgan Chase—announced a new venture to provide better, cheaper health care for their employees. A fundamental problem with today’s system is that patients lack knowledge and control. Access to data can bestow both.

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What the people of the Amazon know that you don’t – Mark Plotkin- TED Video

 

Mark Plotkin: What the people of the Amazon know that you don’t

Published on Nov 24, 2014

“The greatest and most endangered species in the Amazon rainforest is not the jaguar or the harpy eagle,” says Mark Plotkin, “It’s the isolated and uncontacted tribes.” In an energetic and sobering talk, the ethnobotanist brings us into the world of the forest’s indigenous tribes and the incredible medicinal plants that their shamans use to heal. He outlines the challenges and perils that are endangering them — and their wisdom — and urges us to protect this irreplaceable repository of knowledge.
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History Channel puts spotlight on Guyana gold – “Bamazon”

History Channel puts spotlight on Guyana gold – “Bamazon”

News Americas, NEW YORK, NY, Fri. Dec. 21, 2012: Guyana’s gold has been put in the spotlight on the new History Channel series, ‘Bamazon,’ which wraps up at 10 p.m. on Dec. 27th.

The show, shot in the Amazon jungle of Guyana, follows eight out-of-work Alabama construction workers led by Alabama real estate mogul Tim Evans, who are risking everything they’ve got on a long-shot chance to find gold in the mineral rich South American nation.            Continue reading

Shell Beach of Guyana – by Dmitri Allicock

SHELL BEACH OF GUYANA – by Dmitri Allicock

 SHELL BEACH PHOTOS BY MARCO FAROUK BASIR

 By Dmitri Allicock – for Guyanese Online

Guyana’s 285 miles Atlantic coast is not famous for beaches. The coastal plain is made up largely of alluvial mud swept out to sea by the mighty Amazon, carried north by ocean currents, and deposited on the Guyanese shores. The rich clay of great fertility, this mud overlays the white sands and clays formed from the erosion of the interior bedrock and carried seaward by the rivers of Guyana.

Several rivers flow north from the rain forests to the ocean, and one entices beach goers. The enormous Essequibo River is South America’s third largest. As it nears the Atlantic, the mouth widens to 20 miles, and hundreds of islands dot the river landscape. Silt carried on these rivers that drain into the Atlantic Basin, keeps the water off Guyana a brown churning mass of sandbars and mud. Mud flats continue up to 24 kilometers (15 miles) offshore before navigation is considered free.

Read complete article: Shell Beach of Guyana – by Dmitri Allicock

2011: The Self-Publishing Year In Review

2011: The Self-Publishing Year In Review

December 29 2011
This has been a year of massive changes. Some of the older hands say that the business has always been this way.However, I don’t think we are simply seeing another year of flux. Instead, we are witnessing a process unfold which will revolutionize publishing forever (or at the very least, the foreseeable future).But hey, I could be wrong, and we might all be back querying – and fawning in the comments of agents’ blogs – by March.
January
The year opened with a booming e-book market as millions of Americans went on a binge buying spree to fill up their new e-readers – most of which were Kindles. That led to a handful of self-publishers posting truly eye-catching numbers, some of whom were beginning to be approached by agents and publishers, and being offered foreign deals. Success, however, was not just limited to these few and, from the middle of the month especially, most self-publishers saw a dramatic increase in business.  Continue reading